Renaissance Guild – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 14:06:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Renaissance Guild – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 Jimmy White interview: How Ronnie O’Sullivan inspired Whirlwind’s fairytale run at the UK Championship in York https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/12/jimmy-white-interview-how-ronnie-osullivan-inspired-whirlwinds-fairytale-run-at-the-uk-championship-in-york/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 14:06:01 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/12/jimmy-white-interview-how-ronnie-osullivan-inspired-whirlwinds-fairytale-run-at-the-uk-championship-in-york/ The 60-year-old will leave the UK Championship at York tonight – 30 years after winning the UK title in 1992 – to face Welshman Ryan Day. It will be his biggest match since playing in the Masters in 2010, and he is the oldest player to qualify for the last 32 since Eddie Charlton in […]]]>

The 60-year-old will leave the UK Championship at York tonight – 30 years after winning the UK title in 1992 – to face Welshman Ryan Day. It will be his biggest match since playing in the Masters in 2010, and he is the oldest player to qualify for the last 32 since Eddie Charlton in 1993.

A rejuvenated white showed flashes of brilliance which made him a fan favorite for over 40 years, battling through four qualifying rounds – beating Stephen Maguire and Dominic Dale along the way – at Sheffield’s Ponds Forge this week simply to hit the TV stages at the Barbican.

The Whirlwind is rightly considered snooker royalty, one of the sport’s pioneers – winning all the sport has to offer except the World Championship, where he fell at the last hurdle six times – having been professional for 42 years.

Twelve years after his last appearance at a Triple Crown event, Jimmy White is back at the UK Championship in York (Photo: John Gichigi/Getty Images)

He freely admits he thought his silverware hunting days were over, but credits his time working on the Eurosport commentary team – alongside O’Sullivan – with inspiring him on the table.

“I’ve always played exhibitions and demos, some locally, some around the world,” White told The Yorkshire Post. “You have to keep an eye on the inside.

“Probably 20 years ago I was like ‘well, I’m just going to play on the exhibition side’, I wasn’t too concerned about the competitions.

“But for the past five years, since working with Eurosport, around Ronnie O’Sullivan – I’ve always had the passion – but I seem to have the drive to train again.

Jimmy White has been a professional for over 40 years. (Photo: John Gichigi/Getty Images)

“Now all of a sudden I’ve hit form and I know that this type of game I have can win a tournament. I’m thrilled with my game right now.

“I’ve played Ronnie in exhibitions all over the world – and he’s like Rafael Nadal in exhibition tennis – he’s always trying to annihilate the guy in the other seat. It keeps me sharp.

“I love the game, I love the competition and I didn’t care who I drew in the tournament.

“Don’t get me wrong, I’m really looking forward to York, it’s going to be fantastic.”

Working with Ronnie O’Sullivan helped inspire the revival of Jimmy White (Photo: Bethany Clarke/Getty Images)

White beat John Parrott 16-9 to win his only British title in 1992 at Preston’s Guild Hall.

“I can’t believe that was 30 years ago,” White said. “I’m 60, but I still feel like I’m 25.”

He arrived in York last night and insists he is not here ‘to play up the numbers’, believing he still has the game to be a major contender.

A week fighting for qualifying in Sheffield certainly shows that his dedicated work on the mental side of his game is paying off.

Jimmy White (right) reached six world championship finals in the 1990s. (Picture: Allsport UK/Allsport)

“I’ve been working on the mental side of the game for the past few weeks,” admitted White, guaranteed at least £10,000 at York to boost his current world ranking of 89. “My mindset sometimes, even when I I was playing Dominic Dale and 2-1 I lost all focus You get a little negative when you lose focus but I just had to say to myself ‘come on keep it up’ It was the same against Maguire, I was trailing 3-1 but I still wanted to win.

“If you have that inner confidence, it’s great and it keeps you going. It keeps your expectations high of yourself. So when I had an opportunity, I took it.

“If I take my practice game, my A game, I would win the world championship. But that makes it last 17 days. I haven’t even kept it for a week for a long time.

“So that shows how important my game is. As you get older, your level of concentration goes down.

“Before, I could play, in bowls, and part of my brain would say to me ‘did you water the plants before leaving home?’ The other part of my brain is telling me “that’s irrelevant, you have a job to do, potting those balls”. I have all these conversations (in my head).

“At the moment I’m well tuned which is good and I’m just focusing on the game, training is going well and I just can’t wait.”

White will be joined in York by three-time British champion Ding Junhui, who also struggled in the qualifying rounds in his hometown of Sheffield.

Ding booked his return to York with a 6-4 loss to Robert Milkins.

“I missed a good chance to win 6-3 and then I was worried because Robert is still a dangerous player,” said Ding, 35, who won his first British title at the Barbican as a teenager in 2005.

“It’s been a long time since I won anything, I don’t know what happened. I focus on training, but during a game sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t.

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Home Calendar | The Spokesperson’s Review https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/08/home-calendar-the-spokespersons-review/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/08/home-calendar-the-spokespersons-review/ Arts and Crafts Spokane Jewelers Guild – Members of the guild work in sterling silver, titanium, copper and mixed metals, as well as vitreous glass enamel, polymer clay, fibers, found objects, crystal and precious and semi-precious stones. Techniques include goldsmithing, beadwork, weaving (thread, fibers, beads), threaded designs with gemstone beads, fusion, riveting and more. Until […]]]>

Arts and Crafts

Spokane Jewelers Guild – Members of the guild work in sterling silver, titanium, copper and mixed metals, as well as vitreous glass enamel, polymer clay, fibers, found objects, crystal and precious and semi-precious stones. Techniques include goldsmithing, beadwork, weaving (thread, fibers, beads), threaded designs with gemstone beads, fusion, riveting and more. Until November, 11 a.m. Liberty Building, 203 N. Washington St. Free. (509) 385-2369.

Mead Bandwagon Craft Fair – Annual craft fair featuring arts, crafts, face painting and more. Sunday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mead High School, 302 W. Hastings Road. $2. (509) 465-7000.

Ridgeline Band Booster’s First Annual Fall Craft Fair – Fall Craft Fair with over 80 artisans/vendors, baked goods and concessions for sale all day. Sunday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ridgeline High School, 20150 E Country Vista Dr., Liberty Lake. $2. (509) 558-3800.

46th Annual Christmas Arts and Crafts Show – Featuring the works of professional Northwest artists and artisans including gourmet foods, jewelry, hand-thrown pottery, molten glass work , woodturning, metal art, photography, soaps, candles, paintings and more. Friday, 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Saturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Nov. 20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Spokane County Fair and Exhibit Center, 404 N. Havana St., Spokane Valley. $8-10.

Courses/Workshops

Pottery Fundamentals II – Instructed by Erik Rodgers, in this beginner to intermediate level course, students will build on their pottery wheel experience and learn new techniques to expand their ceramic practice. Techniques covered will vary depending on students’ interest, but may include: grips, foot rings, adding textures, covers, and using studio tools. Sign up at bit.ly/3tcrypR. Through Dec. 14, 11 a.m. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene. $175.00.

Friends of Dementia Information Session – Discuss five key messages about dementia, activities to increase understanding and actions that support people with dementia. Presented by Aging and Long Term Care of Eastern Washington (ALTCEW). Sign up at bit.ly/3Ws2QPS. Tuesday, 3-4 p.m. Cheney Library, 610 First St., Cheney. Free. (509) 893-8280.

The Credibility of Climate Models – Discussion on climate change featuring climate models that will provide us with cutting-edge scientific information on climate trajectories. Tuesday, 5:30 p.m. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. Free. (509) 328-4220.

Skateboard Painting with Nathan Baker – In this two-day workshop, students will be given a skateboard deck to design and paint. All materials are provided by Emerge. Sign up at bit.ly/3fovyk1. Tuesday, 6-8:30 p.m. Emerge, 119 N. Second St., Coeur d’Alene. $85. (208) 930-1876.

Fiber Arts Studio – Bring a spinning wheel, knitting needles and/or crochet hooks and yarn and create with other fiber artists. Wednesday, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Create Art Center, 900 W. Fourth St., Newport. $3 donation. (509) 447-9277.

Hand Sewing – Meet other hand seamstresses and learn about appliqué, cross stitch, embroidery, crochet, knitting and more. Wednesday, 1-4 p.m. Create Art Center, 900 W. Fourth St., Newport. Free. (509) 447-9277.

Fireside Sewing – Gather around the fireplace in the Library’s Story Room to create an embroidered dishcloth pattern of your choice. Five-week course for children aged 9 to 12. Supplies, stories and hot chocolate will be provided. Register at cdalibrary.org/library-events/fireside-stitching/. Wednesdays, 4 p.m. Coeur d’Alene Library, 702 E. Front Ave., Coeur d’Alene. Free. (208) 769-2315.

Fundamentals of Drawing for Teens – Marlene Laurich leads students in the techniques of drawing line, shape, form and space. Open to children from 12 to 15 years old. Sponsored by the Kalispel Tribe Youth Art Fellowship. Food and snacks provided. Call (509) 447-9277 or visit createarts.org to register. Mandatory masks. Wednesday, 3-4:30 p.m. Create Art Center, 900 W. Fourth St., Newport. Free. (509) 447-9277.

Come and Draw – Explore different artistic mediums, develop skills and ideas, and get feedback. Open to all ages. Wednesday, 5:30-7:00 p.m. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Parkway. Free. (509) 279-0299.

Pricing and Sales Tips – Learn about different pricing techniques for retail and service businesses with the help of a SCORE Mentor. Get tips on how to prepare your business for sales during the holiday season. Registration is mandatory. Sign up at bit.ly/3gYQ5vH. Thursday, noon-1:30 p.m. Online. Free.

Round Reed Basket with Olivia – Beginner/Intermediate level with a looped edge. Bring needle nose pliers and lunch. Register at createarts.org. Pre-registration required. Friday, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Create Art Center, 900 W. Fourth St., Newport. (509) 447-9277.

Renaissance Art: Workshop with Tom Quinn – A slideshow lecture on the great period of art that began in Italy in the 14th century and ended in the 16th. Sign up at bit.ly/3SsV3yq. Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. $40. (509) 325-1500.

Home & Garden

Poinsettia Tours – Visit the various greenhouses and learn how poinsettias are grown in the harsh winter climate and enter to win a prize at the end of the tour. Multiple dates and times available, for more info visit bit.ly/3NJOKFs. Through Saturday, 11 a.m. Plant Farm, 14208 E. Fourth Ave., Spokane Valley. $2.50. (509) 926-9397.

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The Ultimate Guide to Houston’s Holiday Markets and Bazaars in 2022 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/04/the-ultimate-guide-to-houstons-holiday-markets-and-bazaars-in-2022/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 22:25:37 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/04/the-ultimate-guide-to-houstons-holiday-markets-and-bazaars-in-2022/ Holidays can be stressful, especially when trying to find the perfect gift for that special someone. Fortunately, Houston sellers are making it easy for you this year. Bring the joy back into the season and head to the many holiday markets and bazaars in and around the city. Shop for artisan goods, […]]]>



Holidays can be stressful, especially when trying to find the perfect gift for that special someone. Fortunately, Houston sellers are making it easy for you this year. Bring the joy back into the season and head to the many holiday markets and bazaars in and around the city. Shop for artisan goods, devour delicious food and support local talent, all while having fun at these 12 seasonal markets and events.

NOVEMBER 10-12 | WEBSTER CIVIC CENTER, FREE ENTRY

The Velvet Stocking Christmas Bazaar returns to Webster for its 41st anniversary. Known as one of the oldest Christmas bazaars in the Houston Bay Area, this event brings together local artisans to showcase intricate artwork and crafts. Each vendor has their own market category (gifts, bargains, decorate and imagine), allowing guests to purchase original pieces from each stall.




10-13 NOVEMBER | NRG CENTER, $18 AND UP

Kick off the holiday season at Houston Ballet Nutcracker Market. This iconic event features a unique group of merchants, offering everything from homewares and seasonal gifts to toys and accessories. The market began in 1981, when longtime Houston Ballet supporter Preston Frazier approached the ballet guild’s board of directors with an exciting concept that would help raise funds for the foundation, the academy and the scholarship programs. What started as a church bazaar gradually turned into a three-day shopping experience at the NRG Center. Not only does this holiday market make it easy for customers to shop locally, it’s also an effective way to give back, as 11% of the proceeds from every ticket purchased and merchandise purchased goes to the Houston Ballet Foundation, the academy and scholarship programs.

NOVEMBER 11-12 | CYPRESS CREEK CHRISTIAN CHURCH, FREE ENTRY

Already disappointed by the imminent closure of the Texas Renaissance Festival? Travel to another moment in time at Dickens Market, a Victorian-themed Christmas market that features 85 stalls showcasing crafts and delicious food. The event is organized by Cypress Creek Community Chorale, a non-profit organization dedicated to bringing deep choral music to Northwest Houston. The Dickens Market draws massive crowds each year with unique produce and live entertainment. Did we mention that they are hosting a raffle for the enjoyment of attendees?

NOVEMBER 12 | CULTURAL CENTER, FREE ENTRANCE

The Holiday Bazaar organized at the Cultural Center on rue Bissonnet encourages visitors to discover the historical and artistic traditions of Russian culture. Customers can find gifts for upcoming holidays such as Thanksgiving, Catholic/Orthodox Christmas, New Years, etc. Beautiful handmade items like colorful wooden tableware called Khokhloma, Russian nesting dolls and individually painted jewelry boxes can all be purchased at this bazaar. Once you’ve finished shopping, discover the centre’s collection of contemporary art.

November 19-20 | HERITAGE PLACE PARK, FREE ENTRY

Head to Big Top for the ultimate family affair. The Shopping Festival will feature a wide selection of exhibitors who will bring the very best in boutique clothing, accessories, home decor, furniture, gourmet food, garden decorations and, of course, holiday items. . The market is made up of handicrafts and manufactured items, ranging from $5 to $2,000. Shopping at this festival directly puts money back into the community, as all of the exhibitors are small business owners. They offer a wide variety of indoor and outdoor Christmas decor and have an amazing play area for kids ages 3-14.

NOVEMBER 20 | KARBACH BREWING RESTAURANT AND PATIO, FREE ENTRANCE

German-style brewed beer specialties, local vendors and food trucks. What more can you be grateful for? Each year, the Friends of Karbach Market welcomes the most talented artists, vintage curators and designers the city has to offer. Providing a wonderful selection for shoppers to start their holiday spending. This year, the event will also feature a special live performance by JoiLux Dueling Pianos.

NOVEMBER 26 | HISTORIC DOWNTOWN ROSENBERG, FREE ENTRY

Enjoy a day of shopping and goodies while supporting local small businesses at the annual meeting cookie walk. Customers receive a free “cookie passport” to guide them on their walk of tasting delicious treats and visiting a variety of vendors. The first 300 participants in the walk will receive an official downtown bag to place all their local products.




DECEMBER 17 | WASHINGTON AVENUE, FREE ADMISSION

Shop with over 30 vendors at the growing holiday market exhibit. This event is open to anyone who wants to enjoy a good atmosphere, live music and shopping. There will also be door prizes as well as giveaways and a 360 photo booth to capture all the fun in your holiday market! Support local creators and meet some of Houston’s dedicated community leaders. Santa Claus will also be present to take pictures with the children and collect letters to take back to the North Pole.

DECEMBER 2 | PEARLAND INDEPENDENCE PARK, FREE ENTRY

Get into the Christmas spirit at Blitzen’s Bazaar. This festive gift market features exhibitors and food trucks from Big Top and HEB’s Winter Wonderland. Attendees can expect great sightings from city council, community leaders, Mayor Kevin Cole, and even Santa Claus himself, as they gather for the traditional Christmas tree lighting. City Christmas. The market will also feature light shows, ending the evening with a spectacular fireworks display.

DECEMBER 10-11 | POST HOUSTON, FREE ENTRY

This holiday market promises an unforgettable shopping experience at the POST in downtown Houston. The two-day event will host 150 local artists, creatives and creators daily with melodic sounds provided by DJ Lifted. If the ambiance wasn’t immaculate enough, the craft shopping experience will serve up complimentary cocktails and samples from 10 different concept restaurants.

DECEMBER 17 | DOWNTOWN PEARLAND, FREE ADMISSION

The BLCK Christmas Holiday Market is a seasonal affair that celebrates the black community. This market offers live music, food trucks and community activities for the whole family. If you want an exceptional shopping experience with an essence of happy gathering, come to Pearland to witness this special holiday event.

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Things to do in the Long Beach and South Bay areas November 4-10 – Daily Breeze https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/03/things-to-do-in-the-long-beach-and-south-bay-areas-november-4-10-daily-breeze/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 17:02:47 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/03/things-to-do-in-the-long-beach-and-south-bay-areas-november-4-10-daily-breeze/ November 4 Ali Coyle: Presented by the Grand Vision Foundation. Grand Annex, 434 W. Sixth St., San Pedro. 8 p.m. $20 and up. 310-833-4813, grandvision.org. Start conversational Spanish: Topics include greetings, directions, places to go, location of things, health and weather, practical restaurant terminology, and family relationships. William Burns Community Centre, 5510 Clark Avenue, Lakewood. […]]]>

November 4

Ali Coyle: Presented by the Grand Vision Foundation. Grand Annex, 434 W. Sixth St., San Pedro. 8 p.m. $20 and up. 310-833-4813, grandvision.org.

Start conversational Spanish: Topics include greetings, directions, places to go, location of things, health and weather, practical restaurant terminology, and family relationships. William Burns Community Centre, 5510 Clark Avenue, Lakewood. 1 to 2:15 p.m. For further information: Lakewood Town Hall Recreation Office, 562-866-9771; or instructor Gerald Lunderville, 562-421-6645.

Henry VI Part 2 Reading: Little Fish Theatre, 777 S. Center St., San Pedro. $15 and up. 8:00 p.m. Also 8:00 p.m. on November 5 and 3:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. on November 6. 310-512-6030, shakespearebythesea.secure.force.com/ticket.

Lunch meeting: “Solutions to the societal consequences of a health crisis.” Led by Roland Tay, Certified Naturopathic Doctor. Presented by Cancer Support Community South Bay, 2601 Airport Drive, Suite 100, Torrance. 12:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. To register, visit CSCSouthBay.org and select the online calendar. For further information: Rebecca Sul, Rebecca@CSCSouthBay.org.

Seaside pearls: Brought to you by the Azure Verde Chapter of the Embroiderers Guild of America. St. Francis Episcopal Church, 2200 Via Rosa, Palos Verdes Estates. 9:30 a.m. azureverdeega.com.

November 5

2022 Community Conversation: Presented by the Palos Verdes Library District. Malaga Cove Library, 2400 Via Campesina, Palos Verdes Estates. 10 a.m. RSVP to pvlibrary.wufoo.com/forms/z1u3bt9a0sfwi3f.

Answers to the philosophical mysteries of quantum physics: Redondo Beach Public Library, Main Library, 303 N. Pacific Coast Highway. 11am-noon. 310-318-0675, redondo.org/library.

Folk Ballet: Carpenter Performing Arts Center, 6200 E. Atherton St., Long Beach. 8 p.m. $45. 562-985-7000, carpenterarts.org.

Breast cancer and medical Qigong: Led by Benj Sinskul, a medical qigong practitioner. Presented by Cancer Support Community South Bay, 2601 Airport Drive, Suite 100, Torrance. 10am-12pm. To attend this workshop in person, visit CSCSouthBay.org and select the online schedule. For further information: Rebecca Sul, Rebecca@CSCSouthBay.org.

Guided nature walk: Presented by Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy. George F Canyon Nature Preserve, 27305 Palos Verdes Drive East, Rolling Hills Estates. pvplc.org.

My dog ​​is better than your dog: Presented by the Torrance Cultural Arts Foundation. James Armstrong Theater, 3330 Civic Center Drive. 8 p.m. $30-$50. 310-781-7171, torrancearts.org.

Nature Walk Animator Training: Presented by Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy, 916 Silver Spur Road, No. 104, Rolling Hills Estates. 9am-noon. pvplc.org.

Outdoor Volunteer Day: Presented by Palos Verdes Peninsula Land Conservancy. Abalone Cove Reserve, 5970 Palos Verdes Drive South, Rancho Palos Verdes. 9am-noon. pvplc.org.

Path to Personal Freedom-12 Concepts: Ten, eleven and twelve. Led by Herb Kaighan, Spirit Guide. Presented by Mary and Joseph Retreat Center. $10 from 10 a.m. to noon. Register at maryjoseph.org.

Ephemeral Photographic Art Fair: Sponsored by photographic and digital artists. Palos Verdes Art Center Atrium, 5504 Crestridge Road, Rancho Palos Verdes. 10am-4pm pvartcenter.org.

Rapid response – work on the trails: Forrestal Reserve, 32201 Forrestal Drive, Rancho Palos Verdes. 9am-noon. pvplc.org.

Sacred Expressions – Paint, Pause, Pray: Directed by Melissa Calderon and Myraed David. Presented by Mary and Joseph Retreat Center. $40. Morning session, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Afternoon session, 2 p.m.-5 p.m. Register at maryjoseph.org.

Southwest Manuscripts Club/Surfwrites: Local journalist and author Deborah Paul will talk about her career as an international flight attendant. Peninsula Center Library, 701 Silver Spur Road, Rolling Hills Estates. 2-4 p.m. 310-676-7494.

Renaissance street corner: Presented by the Grand Vision Foundation. Grand Annex, 434 W. Sixth St., San Pedro. 8 p.m. $25 or more. 310-833-4813, grandvision.org.

Hike of the Wandering Jews: Saturday afternoon hikes in Palos Verdes. Most hikes are easy or moderate, lasting 1-2 hours and starting at 2 or 5 p.m. Some are followed by potluck dinners. Adults, children, seniors and dogs are welcome. Information: Dan Klerman at president@nertamid.com.

November 6

Cultural talks: With guest speaker Austin Wintory, video game composer master class. Presented by San Pedro Waterfront Arts District. Cabrillo Marine Aquarium, 3720 Stephen M. White Drive. 2 p.m. $12-$16. Sign up at bit.ly/3DXrMqZ.

Upcoming Attractions: “The Definitive History of the Movie Palace.” Gardena Cinema, 14948 Crenshaw Blvd. 5:30 p.m. Registration at bit.ly/3NMDU1H.

Open day: Marymount High School, 10643 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles. 12:30 p.m.-3:15 p.m. mhs-la.org/admission/visit-mhs.

South Bay bromeliad associates: With guest speaker and club member Bryan Chan. Peninsula Center Library Community Hall, 701 Silver Spur Road, Rolling Hills Estates. 1:30 p.m.

Vet Day III: Presented by the Rotary Club of Manhattan Beach. Kinecta, 1440 Rosecrans Avenue, Manhattan Beach. Tickets from noon to 6 p.m. cost up to $50. Sign up at bit.ly/3zHCxLK.

Whispers of trees: Presented by the Torrance Cultural Arts Foundation. James Armstrong Theater, 3330 Civic Center Drive. 2:30 p.m. $30-$50. 310-781-7171, torrancearts.org.

November 7

Nutritional Meals for Lung and Skin Health: Led by Lilly Padilla, Certified Integrative Nutrition Coach, Author, and Cancer Survivor. Presented by Cancer Support Community South Bay, 2601 Airport Drive, Suite 100, Torrance. 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. To register for an in-person or virtual workshop, visit CSCSouthBay.org and select the online schedule. For further information: Rebecca Sul, Rebecca@CSCSouthBay.org.

November 8

Discussion on books for adults: “The Long Petal of the Sea” by Isabel Allende. Led by Senior Librarian Erin Schoonover. Presented by the Redondo Beach Public Library. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Register at bit.ly/3Wuz8K8.

Atonement for sin: Hosted by Dawn Unity Group. St. John Fisher Catholic Church, 5448 Crest Road, Rancho Palos Verdes. 7:30 p.m. 310-833-7008, live at facebook.com/dawnunitygroup/live.

Good Afternoon Long Beach Networking: With Mark Dodson, Vice President and Senior Relationship Manager for Bank of America. Presented by the Long Beach Area Chamber of Commerce. Parkers Lighthouse, 435 Shoreline Drive. Noon-1 p.m. $25 for members/$35 for non-members. Register at lbchamber.com.

Overeaters Anonymous: First Christian Church, Room 9, 2930 El Dorado Street, Torrance. 7:30 p.m. Call Jennifer at 310-529-5708.

Remove books wisely: Harbor Church Assembly Hall, 15401 S. Western Ave., Lomita. 7-8 p.m. 310-378-2920.

November 9

Centering Prayer Group: Directed by Greg Johnson and Herb Kaighan. Presented by Mary and Joseph Retreat Center. 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Register at maryjoseph.org.

Protect yourself from cyber scams: With Jackie Wiley of the Department of Financial Protection and Innovation. Presented by the Palos Verdes Library District. Malaga Cove Library Community Hall, 2400 Via Campesina, Palos Verdes Estates. 10-11 a.m. 310-377-9584, ext. 217, pvld.org.

PV Seniors Bohannon Lecture Series: “What’s New for Fall and Winter at the Botanical Garden,” featuring Stephanie Yinger, South Coast Botanical Garden Community Relations Manager, and Grace Cuffel, Volunteer Programs Coordinator, Scriba Family Center, 602 Deep Valley Drive, Suite 310, Rolling Hills Estates. 10:30-11:30 a.m. 310-377-3003, pvseniors.org.

November 10

Bay Cities Coin Club: Westchester Masonic Lodge, 7726 W. Manchester Ave., Playa Del Rey. 6 p.m. baycitiescoinclub@hotmail.com.

Fall 2022 Dance Set: Long Beach City College, Liberal Arts Campus, 4901 Carson St. 7-9 p.m. $10-$15. lbcc.edu.

Lego-Club: Redondo Beach Public Library, North Branch, 2000 Artesia Blvd. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Tickets required. Get your tickets at the children’s reference counter 15 minutes before the start of the program. Limit of 40 people. 310-318-0675, redondo.org/library.

Shakespeare and his friends aloud: “As You Like It” by William Shakespeare. Act III, Scene V. 4 p.m. Registration at carpenterarts.org.

It’s Love! : Tribute to Councilman Joe Buscaino, reception and film. Warner Grand Theater, 478 W. Sixth St., San Pedro. 5 to 9 p.m. $20 for the Grand Vision Foundation or chamber members; $25 for non-members. grandvision.org.

In progress

Art curated by Gardena High students: “Gifted: Collecting the Art of California at Gardena High School, 1919-1956,” runs through November 12 at the Palos Verdes Art Center, 5504 Crestridge Road. From 1919 to 1956, seniors at Gardena High selected, purchased, and donated 72 works of art as class gifts at school. Over the years, additional works have been added to the collection, which has been in storage for nearly 50 years until this show. The PVAC Museum is open Monday through Saturday. Guided tours will be available on Tuesdays and Saturdays during the show from 10 a.m. to noon and by appointment. Full details at pvartcenter.org.

NAMI South Bay: Family and peer support groups for mental illness are meeting virtually right now. Information on times and dates: namisouthbay.com or email Paul Stansbury at pstans5@aol.com.

National Writing Month: The Palos Verdes Library District hosts writing programs and conferences to celebrate National Writing Month for teens and adults, and for genres such as novels, poetry, nonfiction, and memories. Essays, workshops and conferences will be organized in all libraries – Peninsula Center, Malaga Cove and Miraleste – until November 23. “WriMo” will result in the publication of an anthology made available to participants. Writers who attend at least four events can be included in the anthology and share a live reading on January 25. Teens will have the opportunity to enter a contest to win $50, be featured on the library’s website, and have their work read by famed author Phil Stamper. Registration for the anthology is closed. For more details: pvld.org or 310-377-9584, ext. 601.

Send calendar announcements two weeks before the scheduled event to calendar@dailybreeze.com.

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Brews News: Always something new at the region’s craft breweries https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/29/brews-news-always-something-new-at-the-regions-craft-breweries/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 04:16:19 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/29/brews-news-always-something-new-at-the-regions-craft-breweries/ Breadcrumb Links Food A boat, a forbidden bay, and Ontario’s forgotten German village — here are three things to ponder on Southern Ontario’s craft breweries this week. Author of the article: wayne newton • Special for Postmedia News Sounds Like You Could Use a Pony Ride is the latest entry in the Tiny Batch series […]]]>

A boat, a forbidden bay, and Ontario’s forgotten German village — here are three things to ponder on Southern Ontario’s craft breweries this week.

Content of the article

A boat, a forbidden bay, and Ontario’s forgotten German village — here are three things to ponder on Southern Ontario’s craft breweries this week.

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Equals buys Side Launch. Equals is the stellar brewing facility in an east London industrial park. It’s where brands such as Triple Bogey are brewed under contract and the city’s best lager, Shake, is brewed under Equals’ own banner in support of London Health Sciences Centre’s Baker Center for Pancreatic Research.

In a move few saw coming, Equals now also owns a boat-building tribute brewery, Side Launch in Collingwood.

From producing beer under contract for others to producing its own beer and the Bangarang range of seltzers to taking over an existing craft brewery, this has seen a rapid increase since 2018 when Equals opened. .

As company president Justin McKellar told Collingwood Today, “Having been in the industry for so long and knowing the history of Side Launch and the history of beers and the location in Collingwood , they have always been an admirable craft brewer, in my opinion. . As we researched potential partnerships and ways to grow our brand, Side Launch was honestly at the top of our list from the start.

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What will Equals do with Side Launch? Expanding capacity by brewing beers in London is an easy first step. Side Launch has nine LCBO listings and its lineup includes a well-regarded, well-selling wheat beer.

Could the new Side Launch Brewery Pubs be next? There are good locations in and around London – here’s what to look out for, dockside at Port Stanley and trackside at Western Fair.

Berry prohibited. Americans banned black currants for decades because they believed the plants helped transmit diseases to white pines and ruin logging. Some states still ban the plant. While Canada never followed suit and labeled it a forbidden fruit, its acidity was not well accepted outside of first-generation Europeans. Now there’s a renaissance and you can’t swing a cart at a farmers’ market without finding vitamin C-rich blackcurrant jam. In Cambridge, Four Fathers noticed and brewed Current Currants, a strong dark beer infused with small berries. Current Currants, at 7.5% alcohol, is a fresh, timely beer sold in the Four Father dining room and in cans at the retail store.

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Four Cambridge dads turned to tart black currants to brew Current Currants, a 7.5% alcohol dark beer.  (FOUR FATHERS photo)
Four Cambridge dads turned to tart black currants to brew Current Currants, a 7.5% alcohol dark beer. (FOUR FATHERS photo)

It takes a village to raise a German. Of course, Oktoberfest in Canada is synonymous with Kitchener-Waterloo where overconsumption is buzzing. Smaller communities and some breweries hold Oktoberfest events tied to festbeer launches. But one nature seems to have been forgotten: the small village of Neustadt in Gray County, where 150-year-old stone buildings make it one of the prettiest little places in the province. Two of the finest examples are a former hotel that is now a family restaurant and the rejuvenated Neustadt Springs brasserie.

Mikyla Grau is in the Oktoberfest mood in Neustadt Springs.  The brewery is the main draw for visitors to the Gray County village which has strong German roots.  (Photo NEUSTADT SPRINGS)
Mikyla Grau is in the Oktoberfest mood in Neustadt Springs. The brewery is the main draw for visitors to the Gray County village which has strong German roots. (Photo NEUSTADT SPRINGS)

Neustadt Springs is taking baby steps with an October 29-30 Oktoberfest event featuring Marvin the Marzen pints and German snacks. Fingers crossed that this will be a bigger problem by 2023, as the village was created by German immigrant champions to attract fall tourists, including cyclists who might be drawn to the loop of the country road from Neustadt.

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The Neustadt Springs brewery, located in a long, narrow stone building built in 1859, offers new beers as well as a new version of one of its classics. West Gray APA, Fall Harvest Pumpkin Ale brewed with mashed local pumpkins and spices, and Peach Mango Kettle Sour are new and hitting the mark with loyal local customers and travelers alike. A batch of 10W30 from Neustadt aged for seven months in whiskey casks sits in the tavern. Next up: a new bourbon-aged beer coming out in time for Christmas gift shopping.


NEW AND RATED

In the tank and awaiting release at Caps Off in St. Thomas is Big Apple Newsie, an apple pie wheat beer featuring fruit harvested at Great Lakes Farms in Port Stanley, plus spices and graham crackers. . To watch in November.

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Tiny Batch beers continue to roll out at Refined Fool in Sarnia. The most recent is Sounds Like You Could Use a Pony Ride, which is an 8.5% bronco strength alcohol. The style is Belgian IPA. The brewers used beer yeast from Belgium and hops from Germany.

Babies and Brews is back at Anderson Craft Ales in London. Parent and baby gatherings have been canceled for three years during the pandemic. It’s Thursday, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., on the brasserie’s mezzanine where babies roam freely and mothers socialize.

Taproom exclusives are de rigueur, but LCBO exclusives are bundles. London Brewing does this with a four-pack dubbed 4GANIC. Thinking outside the box for what’s inside the box is an array to taste: Runner’s High Hazy Pale Ale, Earl of Adelaide Double IPA, Front Porch Organic Session IPA and Organic Hazy IPA.

At the brewery, we always pour Truly Local Grisette. It was brewed in collaboration with the London Homebrewers Guild. They used organic spelled from Howick, wheat from Elora, Triple Pearl hops from Parkhill and Old World Saison yeast from Guelph. This beer, also sold in cans, has notes of cloves and bananas and is noted as a staff choice.

Wayne Newton is a London-based freelance journalist.

wayne.newton@bell.net

Twitter.com/WayneWriteOn

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James Cameron explodes the fashion for 3D films after the success of Avatar https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/25/james-cameron-explodes-the-fashion-for-3d-films-after-the-success-of-avatar/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 20:25:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/25/james-cameron-explodes-the-fashion-for-3d-films-after-the-success-of-avatar/ James Cameron criticizes the rush to produce 3D films that continued after his first Avatar The movie was released in 2009. Avatars the visual effects received numerous awards and accolades, and the film was considered a breakthrough for 3D. The recent reissue has proven the power of Avatars stunning landscapes as 3D images protrude from […]]]>

James Cameron criticizes the rush to produce 3D films that continued after his first Avatar The movie was released in 2009. Avatars the visual effects received numerous awards and accolades, and the film was considered a breakthrough for 3D. The recent reissue has proven the power of Avatars stunning landscapes as 3D images protrude from the screen, immersing audiences in the world of Pandora with a new 4K digital impression. Avatars long-awaited sequel Avatar: The Way of Water, was also shot to produce 3D visuals. The public got a glimpse of this 3D at the end of the Avatar reissue, which featured a brief scene from The water path in the post-credits.

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Whereas Avatars 3D itself was highly regarded, the film caused a surprising amount of imitators. Even at the start of its run, Avatar was a smash hit at the box office, with many critics praising its groundbreaking visuals. Following this success, Hollywood films have made a point of releasing almost every major blockbuster in 3D. 3D tickets cost a few dollars more than their 2D counterparts and for a time were quite popular. 3D was advertised in trailers and posters for upcoming movies, as it was seen as a big selling point for movies.

Related: Avatar Re-Release End Credits: All Avatar 2 Footage & Reveals Explained

In a recent interview with The New York Times, Cameron and Avatar star Zoe Saldana offer scathing opinions regarding this post-Avatar orient yourself. When asked what he thought of this Hollywood craze for 3D, Cameron replied that “the studios ruined everythingHe went on to explain the differences between the 3D process he underwent and that of the majority of Hollywood films. As Cameron shot with cameras that rendered the visuals in 3D during production, he mentioned that most of these post-Avatar 3D productions have decided”3D post-conversion“, which basically means they add the 3D effect in the post-production process rather than filming with it”3D created natively“Cameron Says Post-Conversion 3-D Method”gave a bad result“, actress Saldana adding that few people put the same commitment to stunning 3D that Cameron did. Check out Cameron and Saldana’s full statements below:

CAMERON I think the studios have ruined everything. Just to save 20% of the cost of creating 3-D, they opted for 3-D post-conversion, which takes it out of the hands of the filmmaker on set and puts it through a post-production process that gave a mediocre result. . I think the new “Avatar” movie will rekindle interest in natively created 3D, which I personally think is the right way to do it. I say either do 3-D or don’t do 3-D, but don’t try to apply it afterwards to get the extra on the ticket.

SALDAÑA And listen, do you want to make a lot of money or do you want to do something that you’re really proud of and that stands the test of time?

CAMERON Should I choose?

SALDAÑA It’s unfortunate, but people have chosen the money-making machine, post-conversion. And not all directors are like Jim, with the level of commitment you put into it. It’s the difference between a project that’s just a blockbuster and something really special, and I wish more directors understood that. If they just took a little course at [Directors Guild of America] …

CAMERON I will teach it!

Will Avatar 2 bring a new round of 3D filmmaking?

As Saldana and Cameron’s discussion of this Hollywood trend indicates, Cameron’s statement shows its value to 3D as an art form. While the director previously hinted at his confidence in Avatar 2 Box office success despite the years, it’s clear that Cameron’s strategy isn’t all about monetary returns. In fact, from what Cameron describes, his 3D process can cost him 20% more than a post-production 3D process. Since Cameron is once again creating a 3D Pandora of epic proportions for The water paththis cycle could repeat itself as other producers and directors take inspiration from Cameron’s work.

The likelihood of a 3D renaissance will likely come down to the success of Avatar: The Way of the Water. The Sequel Has Big Shoes To Fill To Close In On 2009’s Hit Avatar or even other box office hits of 2022, such as Top Gun Maverick. Avatar: The Way of the Water is likely to be a financial success if successful re-release is any indication. In light of Cameron’s analysis of 3D, it will be interesting to see whether those who might once again follow the 3D trend will listen to what Cameron is saying and use native 3D or succumb to the money-hungry fate of adding 3D in post-production.

Read next: James Cameron nailed Avatar 2’s biggest problem (and why it will pull it off)

Source: New York Times

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Belgium: Explore UNESCO World Heritage Sites https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/17/belgium-explore-unesco-world-heritage-sites/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 17:22:03 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/17/belgium-explore-unesco-world-heritage-sites/ 5. The Grand Place Brussels – One of the most important UNESCO World Heritage sites in Belgium The Grand Place is a central square in Brussels, centered on the city’s Gothic Town Hall. The square is flanked by sumptuous guild houses and cafes. The square is also home to the Choco-Story chocolate museum. Nearby are […]]]>

5. The Grand Place Brussels – One of the most important UNESCO World Heritage sites in Belgium

The Grand Place is a central square in Brussels, centered on the city’s Gothic Town Hall. The square is flanked by sumptuous guild houses and cafes. The square is also home to the Choco-Story chocolate museum. Nearby are centuries-old beer bars and restaurants serving steamed mussels.

The Grand Place is also home to the elegant Galeries Royales Saint-Hubert arcade, home to luxury boutiques, watchmakers and chocolate shops. Originally an open market, the Grand Place dates back to the 10th century during the reign of Duke Charles of Lower Lorraine. This area was the commercial center of the city.

In the 11th century, a market was built near the fort and became the center of commercial development in the city. The Grand Place is the most important square in Brussels. It makes an impressive impression, evoking a bustling metropolis in its mercantile heyday. Despite its modern look, this square has remained virtually unchanged since 1695.

The eclectic architecture of the buildings on the square mixes Gothic, Baroque and Louis XIV styles. Today it is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The Grand Place Brussels is a popular tourist destination in Belgium and is an exceptional landmark of the city. This square is home to many iconic buildings and is an important cultural center.

It is a square made up of public and private structures, including former corporations. Designed as a rectangular cobblestone downtown, the square is an architectural gem that showcases the city’s rich history.

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Hive, by designer John Yianni in 2000 gets a boost at the studio https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/16/hive-by-designer-john-yianni-in-2000-gets-a-boost-at-the-studio/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/16/hive-by-designer-john-yianni-in-2000-gets-a-boost-at-the-studio/ Hive Live 2022 was a chance to get hands-on instruction from some of the game’s best. YORKTON – When it comes to games, there are always a few – usually very few – that stand out from the first game and hold your long-term interest. Among abstract strategy games, there has been a real renaissance […]]]>

Hive Live 2022 was a chance to get hands-on instruction from some of the game’s best.

YORKTON – When it comes to games, there are always a few – usually very few – that stand out from the first game and hold your long-term interest.

Among abstract strategy games, there has been a real renaissance decade in terms of notable new games from 2000. Several outstanding games have emerged.

And of these, arguably Hive, by designer John Yianni in 2000, is the best of the bunch. The game is easily among the top five games released in the last half century.

For those unfamiliar with Hive – which we’ve already covered here – it’s a boardless game, much like a modern version of chess in that different pieces have different moves and you aim to capture the game. ‘opponent. bee.

The pieces are big, chunky, and strong, so it’s an heirloom game in that it should last forever and can be played easily on cafes, park benches, or the kitchen table.

So why revisit Hive?

Well, recently, a “workshop” on the game was held in Minneapolis in September.

Hive Live 2022 was an opportunity to get hands-on instruction from some of the game’s best, and for those who couldn’t attend the sessions, they were also on Zoom.

“I fell in love with the game at the start of 2019,” organizer John Sandahl explained via email. “Within a few months I was playing 20 turn-based games online at once and quickly learning that the high end of the community was pretty friendly.”

The idea of ​​a workshop was therefore born, with the first Hive Live organized in 2020.

“I wanted a community of local gamers to play with,” Sandahl said.

Then Sandahl went to seek out “expertise” to help organize the events.

“If I could attract players with skills and knowledge from other places, that would probably help increase local interest,” he said.

“I found out that Joe (Schultz – Jewdoka online) had been working on a book and was based near my home in South Dakota and came that way semi-regularly.

“I reached out to Randy (Ingersoll) of Hive YouTube fame to connect about a possible appearance.

“Both players have agreed to come for a one-day session in 2020 on the day of the lead – around 10 days before the lockdowns start. We had six to eight local players plus Joe and Randy and hardly any online involvement because Zoom wasn’t as common back then.

By attracting Schultz and Ingersoll, the event had two of the top entrants.

You kind of know when a game is maturing and gaining interest when books start appearing to push strategies forward, and there are a few on Hive. A couple to recommend are Play Hive Like a Champion: Strategy, Tactics and Commentary Paperback by Ingersoll and The Canon Of Hive: Groundwork by Schultz.

“I decided to get involved because I was asked to, and thought it would be a good way to make the Hive community bigger and stronger,” Schultz explained.

“As you must already know, I’m kind of in love with Hive. As a reformed chess fan, it helps fulfill my need for an abstract two-player game,” Ingersoll said. “John invited me and I thought it was a great idea. In addition, I was able to meet Joe Schultz in person.

Although the event did not attract many people this year, it has a ripple effect.

“I think about 10 different people participated online – some on zoom and some just on the YouTube live stream,” Sandahl said. “Live, we had Randy and Joe – and we had another California player flown in, and then four more local players joined for games.

“Yes – none were rank newbies. We had one online and one local who had a lower level of experience, but they were still able to stick with content throughout the weekend.

Schultz added, “It was also live on YouTube and it looks like it got a couple hundred views, so I think YouTube was the mode people were tuning in on.”

So what interested those involved the most?

“Everyone seems interested in Hive openings. Which is a good thing because I’m writing a book about it,” Schultz said.

“I did a ‘case study’ of my quarter-final match against a player called RaiD. I explained my research into the guy’s plays and how I formulated my opening approach.

Sandahl added that most just want to better understand the game’s thinking.

“Most of the time, gamers have expressed interest in anything that allows them to find out what other people are thinking – and so hand/brain games are a great way to think about the game,” he said.

The best news for Hive is that the event will return for 2023.

“Yeah, I see it becoming an annual event,” Ingersoll said.

“I hope we can generate more interest and attract more people in person. The pandemic has severely affected the event this year. I wasn’t sure I would be comfortable attending until less than a month before the event.
“This uncertainty has led to less than complete planning.”

But, Ingersoll expects better things to come.

“We’re working on getting it much more organised, both in person and online, for next year.”

“Yeah, I think it’s going to get bigger every year,” Schultz said. “We are taking steps to be better organized and also trying to connect with an overseas group to do a similar thing in tandem.”

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Siddharth Roy Kapur shares his cinematic journey at IIFTC – Planet Bollywood https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/15/siddharth-roy-kapur-shares-his-cinematic-journey-at-iiftc-planet-bollywood/ Sat, 15 Oct 2022 07:26:09 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/15/siddharth-roy-kapur-shares-his-cinematic-journey-at-iiftc-planet-bollywood/ During a fireside chat during the India International Film Tourism Conclave 2022, producer Siddharth Roy Kapur gave his mantra of success to a discerning audience of twenty countries who came to present their locations to Indian filmmakers – “Follow your instinct”. In a chat with Mikael Svensson, head of the South Swedish Film Commission and […]]]>

During a fireside chat during the India International Film Tourism Conclave 2022, producer Siddharth Roy Kapur gave his mantra of success to a discerning audience of twenty countries who came to present their locations to Indian filmmakers – “Follow your instinct”.

In a chat with Mikael Svensson, head of the South Swedish Film Commission and co-chairman of the European Film Commission Network, the founder and managing director of Roy Kapur Films said he had always been in love with the story before deciding to produce it. Commenting on the occasion, he said: “When we decided to produce Rang De Basanti in 2005, many people warned us that the film might not do well because in the end the cast dies, but we followed our instinct. The film’s success paved the way for many more such projects and newcomers to the industry. Ronni Screwvala has backed talent whose stories we loved, regardless of what market or trade pundits might think.

Responding to a question from Mikael about his favorite film as a producer, Siddharth answered “The Last Film Show” without batting an eyelid. Continuing the conversation, he said, “The last movie is one of my favorite movies because it makes viewers fall in love with cinemas. An Indian Oscar is long overdue and we are all keeping our fingers crossed. We Indians have a particular grammar in our films unlike the others, namely the song and dance sequences. A lot of people might not like them, but I’m sure they should survive. Our country has room for international cinema, regional cinema and Hindi language cinema – due to large audience size and large Indian Diaspora spread across the world, whenever we start a film, it is mainly the Indian audience that we keep in mind.

Commenting on the South Indian film industry, Siddharth said, “South Indian cinema is experiencing its moment of renaissance. The public began to accept and appreciate these films. On what is behind choosing a location for the film, the 48-year-old filmmaker said: “As filmmakers we want to be faithful to the script and therefore prefer to shoot on the actual locations as in the script. . However, budget sometimes plays a role and if we get something that doesn’t look like a forced fit and is still within our budgets, then we select that location. Mikael also told the audience a lesser known fact about the former President of Producers Guild of India. He loved performing in school and college and was the head of his college’s Dramatics Society. Siddharth said with a laugh, “Producers act all the time. I loved acting in school and college, but being a professional actor is different. I realized the differences early on and became a producer because I think it suited me more as a person.

The evening was the second day of the 3-day film tourism mega event featuring over 50 international companies from over 20 countries coming to Bollywood, Mumbai to woo Indian filmmakers. The event saw the participation of countries such as Azerbaijan, Abu Dhabi, Krakow, Kazakhstan, Montenegro, Norway, Oman, Panama, Poland, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Yas Island for to name a few.

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Open Studios = Open the doors to The Guild @ 980 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/10/open-studios-open-the-doors-to-the-guild-980/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 19:10:59 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/10/open-studios-open-the-doors-to-the-guild-980/ The world of Buffalo artists and artisans is growing a lot, thanks in part to the efforts of collectives like The Guild @ 980. I spoke to Kevin Hayes, who, along with Michael Gainer, runs the operation. And what an operation it has become! There are currently 50 artists’ and artisans’ studios in operation at […]]]>

The world of Buffalo artists and artisans is growing a lot, thanks in part to the efforts of collectives like The Guild @ 980. I spoke to Kevin Hayes, who, along with Michael Gainer, runs the operation. And what an operation it has become! There are currently 50 artists’ and artisans’ studios in operation at The Guild, which is on the second and third floors of the 45,000 square foot building. Kevin told me there are plans to build 20 more studios this winter, as demand is high for affordable workspaces in a community setting.

The Guild @ 980
A workshop

There are so many talented artists and artisans at The Guild,” Kevin told me. “Like musical instrument maker Michael Schenkel and Kendra Stevens (The Swing Gallery), who makes beautiful swings, and freelance photographer Malik Rainey, who works for The New York Times at 21 years old. Then we have painters, carpenters, people who do jewelry and screen printing, small fabrication, wood, metal and glass. We also have a few people doing custom sneaker upgrades and collectible sneakers.

The first floor of the building is home to ReUse Action, which is filled to the brim with all manner of salvaged, donated, and found goods and materials. This is where you’ll find everything from old doors to fireplace mantels. Back in the day, there were other warehouses that specialized in these types of coveted building and decorating items, like Horsefeathers and Gothic City, but these days, ReUse Action is where it’s at.

Kevin Hayes

One of the things that makes ReUse Action so interesting is that there is a subcontracting division, with its own carpenters. There are also recovery teams that ensure that as much material as possible does not end up in landfills. These hoarded materials (like insulation) take up so much space that Kevin and Michael are preparing to build a pole building (barn) on their property this spring. This will help free up valuable space in the building and on their backyard, which is increasingly reaching full capacity.

Since 2015, ReUse Action and The Guild @ 980 have grown. Not only is the building a major convenience for people looking to repair and accessorize their homes, but it is also a place of inspiration for artists and artisans.

The Guild @ 980
George, holding his book on Las Vegas Radio and TV | Photo courtesy of ReUse Action

On a personal note, I am saddened to learn of the passing of George Thomas (GT) Apfel, who had become an indispensable figurehead (maintenance engineer) at the ReUse Action building. From his golden days in radio as a broadcaster, station manager, engineer, etc. in Las Vegas, until his announced return to Buffalo to help lead the city’s renaissance, George was respected and loved by so many. His journey back to Buffalo is chronicled in this self-penned article Buffalo Rising.

Although George is no longer with us, his spirit is alive and well at ReUse Action and The Guild @ 980. Everything he worked, embodied and wanted for Buffalo continues to come to fruition at this bustling center that is in business for recover, restore and renew. It fit his own mantra to rebuild Buffalo.

When it comes to Creative Studios and the endless sea of ​​salvaged and surplus building materials, the public can see all of this and more, via a series of Open Studios at The Guild @ 980, on the second Saturday of each month, from 11 a.m. This is the perfect time to meet the artists and inhabitants who occupy the studios. Of course, ReUse Action is also open during these hours, as well as during weekly opening hours.

Visit in person at 980 Northampton Street or visit www.reuseaction.com for more information.

Email: info@reuseaction.com | Phone: 716-894-3366

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