Renaissance Guild – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 19:21:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Renaissance Guild – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 How ancient Venetian craftsmanship endures: small, constant changes https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/how-ancient-venetian-craftsmanship-endures-small-constant-changes/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/how-ancient-venetian-craftsmanship-endures-small-constant-changes/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 18:54:17 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/how-ancient-venetian-craftsmanship-endures-small-constant-changes/ Subtle, but meaningful. These are the ways to describe the innovations pursued over the centuries by the glassblowers, bookbinders and shipbuilders of Venice, whose Old World attention to detail and the use of quality materials still resonates today. ‘hui. In fact, the constant pursuit of innovation is a bit of a tradition in itself. So […]]]>


Subtle, but meaningful. These are the ways to describe the innovations pursued over the centuries by the glassblowers, bookbinders and shipbuilders of Venice, whose Old World attention to detail and the use of quality materials still resonates today. ‘hui.

In fact, the constant pursuit of innovation is a bit of a tradition in itself. So in 1574, workers at the Arsenale shipyard assembled in an hour a galley – complete with ropes, sails, oars, and weaponry – with a pre-assembly line process. that of Henry Ford of more than 300 years.

Why we wrote this

Are tradition and modernity still at odds? For the craftsmen of Venice, respecting the secular specifications of the guild is essential. But these glassblowers, bookbinders and shipbuilders are also constantly looking to improve their craftsmanship.

Venice, Italy

The glassmaking, bookbinding and gondola construction trades have changed little over the centuries in this city, which is celebrating its 1600 years this year. Craftsmen practice their skills to precise guild specifications that pre-date the Italian Renaissance.

“There are rules that govern color combinations and proportions,” explains Stefano Coluccio, explaining why he does not accept special orders for his mirrors.

Yet despite respecting tradition, the 1,000 or so artisans of Venice also find ways to innovate within the parameters of their trade. For example, while gondolas have been around since the 11th century, their design has evolved in subtle but significant ways. On a recent visit, carpenter Matteo Tamassia, whose gondolas can take a month or more to build, discussed an improvement to the gunwale with another boatbuilder who has passed by.

Why we wrote this

Are tradition and modernity still at odds? For the craftsmen of Venice, respecting the secular specifications of the guild is essential. But these glassblowers, bookbinders and shipbuilders are also constantly looking to improve their craftsmanship.

This spirit of invention manifested itself in the 16th century. The story goes that in 1574, Henry III of Valois, King of France and Poland, attended a dinner at the Arsenale shipyard, where he saw a galley assemble within an hour – with ropes, sails, oars and armament. The Arsenale’s efficient assembly line process predates Henry Ford’s by more than 300 years.

While the pandemic has dried up tourism, the artisans of Venice have continued to ply their trade. Carpenters continue to take orders for new gondolas. Bookbinders still produce the notebooks that made Venice famous during Gutenberg’s time. Mask makers are designing fabulous creations even as the Venice Carnival was canceled this year. Centuries of changing fortunes have fostered patience.

A common thread binds all these craftsmen: they continue to experiment, improve techniques and introduce novelties – invisible to the uninformed eye – to their old trades. These arts are not only ancient; they are timeless.

Master bookbinder Paolo Olbi cuts cardboard as he begins to work on a notebook. His handmade notebooks sell to select customers around the world.

Paolo Olbi (left) and illustrator Anna Scovacricchi experiment with a technique for stamping velvet covers at the Antica Stamperia Armena.

Mask maker Gualtiero Dall’Osto wears the Red Bull mask, one of his most distinctive creations.

Master craftsman Simone Giordani at Barovier & Toso creates the glass arm of a chandelier.

Carpenter Matteo Tamassia works on a gondola. Branded ships have plied the waters of Venice’s famous canals since the 11th century.

Massimiliano Ballarin examines a modern chandelier in the Barovier & Toso showroom. Founded in 1295, the glass company produces both contemporary and classic lighting.

Squero di San Trovaso, the shipyard of shipbuilder Lorenzo della Toffola, offers maintenance and repair services for gondolas and other boats.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/how-ancient-venetian-craftsmanship-endures-small-constant-changes/feed/ 0
Meet the Distinguished Hudson High School Alumni 2021 | New https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/meet-the-distinguished-hudson-high-school-alumni-2021-new/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/meet-the-distinguished-hudson-high-school-alumni-2021-new/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/meet-the-distinguished-hudson-high-school-alumni-2021-new/ HUDSON – Hudson High School recognized four alumni with its Distinguished Alumni Award. The award recognizes the outstanding work of former HHS students. This year’s winners are: Patrick casanova A resident of St. Croix County for most of his life, Patrick Casanova was introduced to the arts early on through the St. Croix Valley Arts […]]]>


HUDSON – Hudson High School recognized four alumni with its Distinguished Alumni Award.

The award recognizes the outstanding work of former HHS students.

This year’s winners are:






Patrick casanova


A resident of St. Croix County for most of his life, Patrick Casanova was introduced to the arts early on through the St. Croix Valley Arts Guild, which later became the Phipps Center of the Arts. His love of the outdoors comes from his hours of fishing and hunting on the Willow River, Mallalieu Lake and the Sainte-Croix River. He was fortunate to have great colorful storytellers in his family and friends who had a keen sense of the history of this region and shared their knowledge of the community. By participating in the Boy Scouts and following the example set by his parents, he developed a sense of service to the community of yesterday and today.

After graduation, he completed his studies with a BA in Arts Education from UW – River Falls and an MA from Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, Illinois. He also studied Scandinavian design at the University of Oslo, Norway, and the Kashmiri School of Design in Srinagar Kashmir, India. He returned to the Hudson community in 1979 where he remains today after having later careers as a builder, real estate agent before opening the Casanova Glass Studio. For the past 25 years he has had a downtown studio as well as a home studio where he has produced art glass and lighting. He always maintained an open studio atmosphere that included mentoring artists and organizing events open to the public to create adornments and special projects. He believes that it is important for people to see the process as well as the product to appreciate the importance of mathematics, chemistry and physics to the development of the arts.






Théa Feyereisen

Théa Feyereisen


Thea Feyereisen has built a very successful and impactful career in the aviation industry as a Senior Engineering Fellow in Aerospace Electronics. Thea leads international teams to develop aviation safety systems, including cockpit vision systems and artificial intelligence. His inventions reduce the risk of aircraft accidents due to pilot error. It has more than 60 US and foreign patents. Prior to his engineering career, Thea was a bush pilot in Alaska.

Living and raising her daughter in her hometown of Hudson, Thea is active in the community. She is passionate about being a positive role model for women and minorities interested in pursuing a STEM career. Thea advocates for Title IX and is a lifelong promoter of equal opportunities for girls and minority groups. As a varsity athlete herself, Thea has volunteered as a coach and is known for the phrase “You Got This” because she encourages others to soar like she has been doing all of her life.






Brian hayes

Brian hayes


Brian Hayes is recognized for his long career as a physician, specializing as an orthopedic surgeon in several capacities. Born into a military family, Brian served more than twenty years in the military after graduating from West Point. He completed two periods of service in Vietnam before graduating from the University of Texas Medical School in 1976. He is currently a VA Hospital Physician in Roseburg, Oregon.

Brian also holds a science degree from his years at West Point with interests in math and nuclear engineering. Brian Hayes credits his father with the inspiration to explore a variety of interests in life. He could be known as a “Renaissance man” in some way, as he has a high degree of interest and skill in many areas. In his spare time, he enjoys spending time as a carpenter. Brian’s service and dedication to the military and health services is unparalleled and serves as a beacon of light for future generations.






Michael A. Schumacher

Michael A. Schumacher


The Honorable Michael A. Schumacher attended elementary, middle and high school, all located in the Hudson School District. He received a BA from St. Cloud State University and received his JD from the University of Nebraska Law School. He practiced law in Eau Claire, Wisconsin from 1981 to 2007. He was subsequently appointed a judge of the Eau Claire County Circuit Court by Governor Jim Doyle. He was elected unopposed in 2008, 2014 and 2020. He was known to be well prepared, knowledgeable and fair.

Justice Schumacher was a judicial member of the National Board of Trial Advocacy. He has been a member and chaired many local and national committees. He was the administrative presiding judge of Eau Claire County. One area he particularly liked, and for which he was well suited, was presiding over treatment tribunals. There he interacted weekly with offenders who suffered from drug addiction. With dedicated members of a treatment team, he strived to provide treatment and support on the path to recovery and a crime-free lifestyle, rather than jail. There have been many successes and many failures, but Judge Schumacher felt that even those discharged from the treatment court left the experience better prepared to face life’s challenges.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/meet-the-distinguished-hudson-high-school-alumni-2021-new/feed/ 0
A look back at Hollywood’s second golden age https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/a-look-back-at-hollywoods-second-golden-age/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/a-look-back-at-hollywoods-second-golden-age/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 21:46:30 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/a-look-back-at-hollywoods-second-golden-age/ Jake blucker Hi Hollywoodians! For this week’s HollyGOOD Tuesday, we take a look at Hollywood’s second golden age. The 1920s and 1960s are widely considered the golden age of Hollywood, but what many people may not know is that Hollywood experienced what was considered to be its second age. gold in the 1960s and 1970s. […]]]>


Jake blucker

Hi Hollywoodians! For this week’s HollyGOOD Tuesday, we take a look at Hollywood’s second golden age.

The 1920s and 1960s are widely considered the golden age of Hollywood, but what many people may not know is that Hollywood experienced what was considered to be its second age. gold in the 1960s and 1970s. This period is also known as the New Hollywood, Hollywood Renaissance or American New Wave.

New Hollywood has relaxed restrictions on obscenity and controversial, non-family content in films.

Hollywood’s Second Golden Age: Background

The golden age of Hollywood saw the creation of major film studios like Paramount and Warner Brothers and made the film industry one of the largest companies in the United States. American New Wave films presented stylistic choices that set them apart from traditional films released by these studios.

According to NewWaveFilm.com, Jack Valenti was named the new president of the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) in 1966, making revisions to the Production Code. This gave filmmakers the freedom to explore topics that were previously considered taboo in Hollywood such as violence, intimacy, race relations, drugs, politics, and religion.

When Bonnie and Clyde came out in 1967, TIME called this period “the new cinema”. By using new techniques and covering new topics, filmmakers began to attract young moviegoers and changed audiences’ expectations of films.

Hollywood’s second golden age: style

In the 1960s, the rules of the film industry became more lenient, leading filmmakers to experiment with the style. Production studios had less influence over films, allowing directors to take creative control. For this reason, films have become more of an art form than just a lucrative product, according to The catch.

The directors of the American New Wave have strived to increase the level of reality and intensity in the films they have created. the Directors Guild of America Quarterly CEO reported that filmmakers of this period experimented more with sound, playing with ambient sound and overlapping with character dialogue.

According to professor of film studies and author Todd Berliner, the filmmakers of this Hollywood Renaissance borrowed styles from European and Asian art cinema. In his analysis of the cinema of the 1970s, Hollywood Inconsistent: Narration in the cinema of the 70s, Berliner wrote that “the filmmakers of the 1970s … [modified] conventional devices in a way that [resulted] in narrative practices more typical of art cinema than classic Hollywood… ”

Todd Berliner also said that the films of the 70s elicited viewer reactions different from those of old Hollywood, saying that “films often signal viewers reactions that fluctuate in unpredictable, incongruous or uncomfortable ways.” This is probably due to the fact that these films covered more serious topics than what audiences were used to seeing on movie screens.

Hollywood’s second golden age: films and directors

American filmmakers who rose to prominence in the late 1960s are known as the New Hollywood Generation, according to NewWaveFilm.com. These filmmakers created innovative films containing complex themes, moral ambiguity and anti-establishment ideas.

Two of the most successful films of Hollywood’s second Golden Age are Bonnie and Clyde (1967) directed by Arthur penn, and The graduation (1967) directed by Mike Nichols. According to NewWaveFilm.com, both films enjoyed unexpected box office success and significant cultural impact, showing audiences were ready for something new.

NewWaveFilm.com reported that Robert benton and David Newman were inspired by the French New Wave to write Bonnie and Clyde. The film surprised viewers with its graphic violent scenes and the mixing of tones throughout the film.

During the creation The graduation, Mike Nichols made bold creative choices that challenged the traditional Hollywood filmmaking process. He hired a comedy writer to write the screenplay, picked an unknown actor to play one of the lead roles, and pushed the cinematographer to experiment with shots, as reported. NewWaveFilm.com.

Films from this era also explored heavy race issues. The 1967 cinema In the heat of the Night told the story of a black detective who gets involved in a murder investigation and denounces the racist ways of the city in which he works. Realized by Shirley Clarke, Jason portrait is a documentary about a black gay prostitute and her life experiences as he achieves his dream of becoming a cabaret artist.

Movies like The French connection (1971) signaled a new kind of thriller. Director Guillaume Friedkin included high-speed action sequences with the intention of captivating audiences with the film’s fast-paced events.

Other notable directors of this era included Martin scorsese (Middle streets), Stanley kubrick (2001: A Space Odyssey), and Francis Ford Coppola (The Godfather).

With the help of computer-aided special effects, this Hollywood renaissance led to the popularity of the blockbuster with films such as Jaws and Star wars. This trend continued in the film industry, bringing us the big budget movies we are used to watching today.

More entertainment news like this: Hollywood Movies: “Five Perfect Movies,” According to Twitter and Hollywood.com

Hollywood.com is a place where entertainment news actually entertains you. We share the good in Hollywood, highlighting the wellness stories that matter to all types of celebrities. Be a part of the Hollywood good in your own neighborhood with our movie ticketing app (coming soon!) Which gives you a whole new way to buy movie tickets. Compare movie times, theaters and seats near you in seconds. Follow us on Instagram for more celebrity wellness stories.





Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/a-look-back-at-hollywoods-second-golden-age/feed/ 0
The 14th Barbour Playwrights Award returns in June https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/the-14th-barbour-playwrights-award-returns-in-june/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/the-14th-barbour-playwrights-award-returns-in-june/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 12:16:43 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/the-14th-barbour-playwrights-award-returns-in-june/ The Episcopal Actors’ Guild has announced the return of the Barbour Playwrights Award! This festival celebrating new works for the theater will return in June 2021 and feature virtual readings of three new plays nominated by this year’s partner company, Leviathan Lab. The festival begins on Monday June 7 at 7 p.m. with a reading […]]]>


The Episcopal Actors’ Guild has announced the return of the Barbour Playwrights Award! This festival celebrating new works for the theater will return in June 2021 and feature virtual readings of three new plays nominated by this year’s partner company, Leviathan Lab.

The festival begins on Monday June 7 at 7 p.m. with a reading of Learn to read by moonlight by Gaven D. Trinidad. Then Monday June 14 at 7 p.m. EST Panic Room: a villainy of the crows by Cherry Lou Sy. The festival closes on Monday June 21 at 7 p.m. is that of Garrett David Kim Are you there, Truman?. One of these three finalist playwrights will receive a prize of $ 500.

“On behalf of the Leviathan Lab staff and board of directors, we are honored to partner with EAG for the Barbour Prize,” said Ariel Estrada, Founder and Artistic Director of Leviathan Lab. “We are grateful to EAG for its support of Leviathan’s mission to advance the voices of Asians, Pacific Islanders, and Asian Americans in theater and film. All three plays in the series examine tribute as racism, sexism and xenophobia weigh on hearts, minds playwrights all approach this subject from three very different perspectives, offering a fascinating questioning of what it means to be AAPI now, in an America and a world ravaged by COVID, anti-Asian, anti-Darkness and white supremacy hatred. “

In 2007, EAG created this special award to honor the legacy of actor, playwright and EAG member Thomas Barbour (Arthur, Great White Hope) whose support for emerging artists has been an inspiration to many. The Barbour Prize was created and endowed by Janet Barbour Carhart, Alison Barbour Fox and part of the donation left to EAG by the estate of Mr. Thomas Barbour. All profits from staged readings of the Barbour finalists’ plays go directly to support future Barbour Awards.

Past winners of the Barbour Playwrights Award include Reynaldo Piniella (Black Doves, Quick Silver Theater Company, 2019), Alexis Roblan (The Andrew Play, New Perspectives Theater Company’s Women’s Work Project, 2018), Andrea J. Fulton (A Punk or A Gentleman, Theater for a New City, 2017), Perry Guzzi (Across the Way, HB Studios, 2016), Dara O’Brien (Early Sunday Morning (Resonance Ensemble, 2015), Mark Karafin (Man in the Moon, Oberon Theater Ensemble , 2014), Bill Cosgriff (Rio Rita, American Renaissance Theater Company, 2013), Aaron Jafferis (How to Break, ICI, 2012), Ian August (Donna Orbits the Moon, NJ Rep, 2011), Lynn Rosen (Apple Cove, Women’s Project, tie 2010), Laura Eason (40 Days, Women’s Project, tie 2010), Alisha Silver (Golden, Hunter College, 2009) and Jack Frankel (Human Voices, Polaris North, 2008).

Founded in 2009, Leviathan Lab is an award-winning, non-profit creative studio whose mission is the advancement of Asian and Asian American (A / AA) artists and their work. By speaking the words of A / AA artists and showcasing A / AA bodies, presences and gestures on stage and in film, Leviathan strives to open spaces that promote social justice, connect communities and affirm the power of art to change. the world. They function as a laboratory where early career and established A / AA artists can be courageous, experiment and thrive creating works that captivate the audiences Leviathan serves. www.leviathanlab.org

The Episcopal Actors Guild was established in 1923 and is a charitable organization providing emergency aid and professional support to professional performers “of all faiths and none”. We also run a full calendar of events and fundraisers, including concerts, variety shows, play readings, and professional workshops. Learn more about www.acteursguild.org.

Thomas Barbour was a staunch supporter of the theater, emerging playwrights, and the Episcopal Actor’s Guild. On stage and on screen, Mr. Barbour has had a prolific acting career, including roles in Arthur with Dudley Moore and The Great White Hope with James Earl Jones. Off the stage, Mr. Barbour has worked tirelessly on behalf of EAG, serving many years as Treasurer and Vice President. Under his leadership, the Guild’s scholarship program grew from two annual awards of $ 500 to five annual awards of $ 1,000. Mr. Barbour also co-founded Polaris North and was a long-time member of the Perry Street Block Association.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/the-14th-barbour-playwrights-award-returns-in-june/feed/ 0
Antwerp will restore the 16th century brewer’s house https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/antwerp-will-restore-the-16th-century-brewers-house/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/antwerp-will-restore-the-16th-century-brewers-house/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 09:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/antwerp-will-restore-the-16th-century-brewers-house/ Underground water tank in the Brouwershuis. Photo by AG Vesta. © Dries Luyten. The city of Antwerp is restoring one of the last vestiges of its golden age – the Brouwershuis, a former water distribution center near the Scheldt that carried water to the city’s breweries before the start of industrialization. During the transition from […]]]>


Underground water tank in the Brouwershuis. Photo by AG Vesta. © Dries Luyten.

The city of Antwerp is restoring one of the last vestiges of its golden age – the Brouwershuis, a former water distribution center near the Scheldt that carried water to the city’s breweries before the start of industrialization.

During the transition from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, the Brouwershuis was Antwerp’s first water distribution center.

Built in 1553-1554 by Gilbert Van Schoonbeke, a Dutch entrepreneur deeply involved in the development of Antwerp (Van Schoonbeke is said to be responsible for the development of a third of the streets of XVIth century Antwerp), the Brouwershuis is almost completely intact.

Its horse mill, bucket wheel, and water tanks are unique, as is the interior of the council chamber used by the Brewers Guild.

The water from the Scheldt was channeled through a series of moats to the brewer’s pipe, the entrance to which is still under the Ankerruiplaats, and from there it went to the reservoir of the Brouwershuis cellar.

“The still intact horse mill drove the wheel that picked up the water in the cellar tank and dumped it on the upper floor into the outer tank,” according to AG Vespa, the autonomous municipal company for the projects real estate and urban in Antwerp.

From there, the water traveled along a system of wooden pipes to 16 different connected breweries.

Brewers Guild Council Room in the Brewery House. Photo by AG Vesta. © Dries Luyten.

“In 1562, the town became the owner of the ‘Waterhuys’ and from 1581 the brewer’s guild met in the building, which was then called the ‘Brouwershuis'”, explains AG Vespa.

The facility was partially modernized around 1856 with hydraulic pumps to increase the capacity of its foundry, and the Brouwershuis continued to serve as a water distribution center until 1930.

The Brouwershuis is considered a protected monument and, although it became a museum in 1993, it has been closed since 1999 due to its poor condition and the need for extensive restoration.

This restoration is to come: the building will be repaired inside and out, with restored stained-glass windows, ironwork and its blue and natural stone.

The floors will be restored and the attic will be insulated, and the roof will be reinforced and sanitized.

Accessibility will be improved in the large basement tank with a new steel staircase and the addition of a walking platform.

Noria van het Brouwershuis. Photo by AG Vesta. © Dries Luyten.

Some of the technical renovations needed to make the Brouwershuis operational include the restoration of the horse-drawn mill and the wheel that lifts the buckets of water from the lower reservoir to the upper reservoir.

Hydraulic pumps that were added in the 19th century are also in need of repair, and given that we now know that the water in the Scheldt is not as “pure” as it was initially thought in the 1500s, a purification system be put in place.

The once large council chamber will also be restored with new leather and an air conditioning system that will help preserve the authentic historical features inside.

Water troughs from the noria in the Brouwershuis. Photo by AG Vesta. © Dries Luyten.

“The Brewhouse has World Heritage value because it is a testament to the universal importance of access to pure water in dark and murky times,” said AG Vespa.

“There is no second brewery, certainly not one that is still intact and will be operational again in the future.”

The Flemish government has allocated € 985,162 to the restoration project.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/antwerp-will-restore-the-16th-century-brewers-house/feed/ 0
Virtual lecture on art history with Dr Michael Grillo https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/virtual-lecture-on-art-history-with-dr-michael-grillo/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/virtual-lecture-on-art-history-with-dr-michael-grillo/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 22:30:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/virtual-lecture-on-art-history-with-dr-michael-grillo/ Rockland Public Library presents Michael Grillo, Thursday, May 27, 6:30 p.m. on Zoom. This event is free and open to everyone. The great plague of 1348 swept across the European world with an unprecedented ferocity that brought cathartic changes to late medieval society. The substantial losses of their populations shook the newly developed foundations of […]]]>


Rockland Public Library presents Michael Grillo, Thursday, May 27, 6:30 p.m. on Zoom. This event is free and open to everyone.

The great plague of 1348 swept across the European world with an unprecedented ferocity that brought cathartic changes to late medieval society. The substantial losses of their populations shook the newly developed foundations of the emerging guild democracies of 14th century Italy, calling into question their understanding of the world.

“Rather than seeing this era as an interruption of the early Renaissance, could we instead consider how the era of the Great Plague opened up opportunities for rethinking that actually contributed directly to the Renaissance centuries that followed? the library said in a press release.

Focusing on the visual arts of the time, “A Reconsidered World” will explore how catastrophic urban depopulations caused a paradigm shift in the way the peoples of the late Middle Ages conceptualized their world, a world that leads directly to the sense of Renaissance realism that is so familiar to us through our own view of the world through photography, according to the library.

Dr. Michael Grillo is an art professor at the University of Maine. He writes about how 14th-century Italian images function as primary sources that visually articulate ideas inexpressible in any other medium, including the verbal realm. Dr Grillo received his doctorate from Cornell University with a thesis on medieval art history. He continued this work with his 1997 book, Symbolic structures: the role of composition in signaling meaning in Italian painting of the late Middle Ages. He is also a practicing photographer and seeks to explore how aesthetic theories play directly into our world, particularly how photography functions as a culture-specific visual modality.

To get a link to the Zoom event, please email elewis@rocklandmaine.gov by 4 p.m. on May 27 and identify the event you would like to attend in the subject line.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/virtual-lecture-on-art-history-with-dr-michael-grillo/feed/ 0
Joanna Koerten’s scissor-cut works have been compared to Michelangelo https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/joanna-koertens-scissor-cut-works-have-been-compared-to-michelangelo/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/joanna-koertens-scissor-cut-works-have-been-compared-to-michelangelo/#respond Thu, 27 May 2021 13:32:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/joanna-koertens-scissor-cut-works-have-been-compared-to-michelangelo/ This scene was carved from a single sheet of paper, piece by piece. Look at the delicacy of the tree branches and hanging vines, cut into thin cobwebs. Even tree trunks are not strong: the illusion of shading is produced by hundreds of tiny horizontal cuts. Likewise, the clothes of the peasants, the wings of […]]]>


This scene was carved from a single sheet of paper, piece by piece. Look at the delicacy of the tree branches and hanging vines, cut into thin cobwebs. Even tree trunks are not strong: the illusion of shading is produced by hundreds of tiny horizontal cuts. Likewise, the clothes of the peasants, the wings of the birds and the turf on the ground are chosen with incisions so melting that they seem to blend into subtle hues of gray beyond the capacity of ordinary paper.

This work of art was a product of the Renaissance Netherlands, close to the work of Rembrandt and Vermeer. And in his day, the artist who huddled on that sheet, meticulously carving out negative space, was just as famous as these icons. Her name was Joanna Koerten, but her skill with scissors earned her the epithet “Scissors-Minerva”, after the Roman goddess of art.

“The Blok”, the museum she ran away from home, was described by art historian Martha Moffitt Peacock, writing in the Netherlands Directory for Art History, as the “eighth wonder of the world”. Tsar Peter the Great, Cosimi de Medici and countless poets and fellow artists visited there to watch her make her careful incisions. At one point, one of his little pieces of paper sold more than Rembrandt’s monumental Night watch. After her death, her husband published a book of poems to praise his work; over time, the collection has swelled to fill up six volumes.

And yet, in the centuries that followed, his name was more or less inscribed in the history of art. In a way, it was the medium she so skillfully ordered – cut paper – that condemned her. Considered amateurish, dilettantish, more “artsy” than “high art”, the art of paper cutting has been relegated to the realm of mere curiosities, a footnote in the history of art, and Joanna Koerten with .

Oil painting, along with sculpture, was considered the true medium of “high art”. Everything else smacked of kitsch or craftsmanship. Yet the professional world of oil painting, with its strict and exclusive guild regulations, was prohibitive for women. There were a few notable exceptions. Judith Leyster made his living oil painting, was enlisted in the guild, and even hired apprentices. But even Leyster’s fame did not survive her: after her death, most of her paintings were falsely attributed to her husband.

But when you look beyond the prestige medium of oil painting, the picture changes. Like the readjustment of a lens, suddenly a huge wave of work by female artists is developing. To name a few: Anna Roemers Visscher, who etched the glass with a diamond pen; Anna Maria van Schurman, who sculpted in wax; Juffrouw Rozee, who invented a method of painting which astonished his contemporaries so much that some took into consideration it is “witchcraft”.

As Elizabeth Alice Honig explains in ‘The Art of Being’ Artistic: ‘The Creative Practices of Dutch Women in the 17th Century’, most women artists operated in a gray area between the professional world of the studio and the amateur world of crafts at home, playing on the values ​​of the two spheres. Like Honig written:

The economy of the artistic trade is masked by the rituals of courteous visits, the exchange of compliments and expensive gifts, the writing of effusive and elegant poems of praise. We are therefore… in an indeterminate zone between amateurism and professionalism: profit occurs, but is built as a simple by-product of innate talent and love of art.

It is in the skillful negotiation between social constraints that female artists have carved out an unusual niche for themselves.

Koerten was perhaps the most cunning of all. As Peacock argues, as Koerten’s style matured, she developed a distinctive artistic language that allowed her work to be classified as the “high art” of sculpture.

Going through Wikimedia Commons

Consider this portrait of “Roman Liberty”. He exchanges the airy delicacy and snowflake silhouettes of his steelwork in favor of a daring sculptural exploration of depth, light and shadow. White paper replaces white marble; the pair of scissors for the sculptor’s scissors. As one poet wrote:

When Michelangelo and Apelles wanted to paint a picture. They used paint, but J. Koerten made a stroke with the chisel. In cut paper, she paints everything according to nature.

Here it is, in the same breath as Michelangelo. Yet the monumentality was deceptive. From a historiographical point of view, the compromise achieved by Koerten turned out to be as fragile and ephemeral as finely cut paper.


Support JSTOR Daily! Join our new Patreon membership program today.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/27/joanna-koertens-scissor-cut-works-have-been-compared-to-michelangelo/feed/ 0
Rhinebeck Writers Retreat Hosts Residences for 23 Writers of Nine New Musicals https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/rhinebeck-writers-retreat-hosts-residences-for-23-writers-of-nine-new-musicals/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/rhinebeck-writers-retreat-hosts-residences-for-23-writers-of-nine-new-musicals/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 14:35:09 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/rhinebeck-writers-retreat-hosts-residences-for-23-writers-of-nine-new-musicals/ Celebrating its 10th anniversary, Rhinebeck Writers Retreat will host a nine-week in-person residency for 23 musical theater writers from nine new musicals between June 27 and August 29. Beth malone; Emily Saliers Indigo Girls; Jonathan larson winners Avi Amon, Sara cooper, Ty defoeand Anna Jacobs; and fellows of the playwright’s guild Nolan Doran, David Gomez, […]]]>


Celebrating its 10th anniversary, Rhinebeck Writers Retreat will host a nine-week in-person residency for 23 musical theater writers from nine new musicals between June 27 and August 29. Beth malone; Emily Saliers Indigo Girls; Jonathan larson winners Avi Amon, Sara cooper, Ty defoeand Anna Jacobs; and fellows of the playwright’s guild Nolan Doran, David Gomez, and John-Michael Lyles. Executive director Kathy evans said, “We were proud to support Writers last year with Virtual Residences, and I’m so excited to have Writers back in the Hudson Valley with us this summer. We are supporting Writers from diverse backgrounds in the United States cover the history of America, from the Underground Railroad, to the Harlem Renaissance, to Memphis in 1968, to modern Idaho.

An editorial team lives in a private home each week to focus solely on writing. Writers receive a stipend, food, pianos, and supplies. They will work with a member of the Rhinebeck Writers Retreat Resonance Committee, made up of artistic advisors, for dramaturgical support.

The nine musicals were selected from 171 entries representing 380 musical theater writers, which were reviewed by 28 readers in the first round, including Tony winner. Tonya pinkins and director of artistic programs at Signature Theater Iyvon Edebiri. The final round had six panelists: Neil Bartram, Composer; Anika Chapin, Artistic Associate at Goodspeed Musicals; Timothy huang, Composer, lyricist, librettist and alumnus of Rhinebeck; Khiyon Hursey, writer, composer and Rhinebeck alumnus; Kent nicholson, Director of the musical theater of playwrights Horizons; and Barbara pasternack, Artistic Director of TheatreWorks USA.

All of the writers’ costs are covered by donors, including an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the State Legislature of New York, The ASCAP Foundation Bart howard Fund and the Noël Coward Foundation. The major individual support comes from Liz Armstrong; Rick Farrar and Jeff Zadroga; Liz and Bill mills, Steve and Paula reynolds, and Alex robertson. Bios and synopsis can be found at www.rhinebeckwriters.org

Complete range:

June 27 – July 4: Avi Amon, Ty defoe, & Nolan Doran, THE LESSON, with the main support of Alex robertson

July 4 – July 11: David Gomez & John-Michael Lyles, SHOOT FOR THE MOON, with underwriting support from Molly McEneny

July 11 – July 18 Noel Carey & Scott weinstein, C’EST TOUT FOLKS !, with the support of the subscription of Paul Feuerman and Bruce Grivetti

July 18 – July 25: David darrow & Kira Obolensky, FOUR MEASURES, with main support from Steve and Paula reynolds

July 25 – August 1: Brian Quijada & Nygel D. Robinson, MEXODUS, with main support from Rick Farrar and Jeff Zadroga

August 1 – August 8: Sara cooper & Lynne shankel, PERPETUAL SUNSHINE & THE GHOST GIRLS, with the main support of the ASCAP Foundation Bart howard Funds

August 8 – August 15: Amisho Baraka, Art Hooker, Justin Merrick, Gregory Thompson & Anasa Troutman, UNION: THE MUSICAL, with the main support of the Noël Coward Foundation

August 15 – August 22: Anna K. Jacobs & Anna ziegler, A HOUSE WITHOUT WINDOWS, with main support from Liz and Bill mills

August 22 – August 29 Beth malone, Erin ortman & Emily Saliers, STARSTRUCK, with main support from Liz Armstrong



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/rhinebeck-writers-retreat-hosts-residences-for-23-writers-of-nine-new-musicals/feed/ 0
Controversial city council race shakes Dallas Jewish community https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/controversial-city-council-race-shakes-dallas-jewish-community/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/controversial-city-council-race-shakes-dallas-jewish-community/#respond Wed, 26 May 2021 11:47:10 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/controversial-city-council-race-shakes-dallas-jewish-community/ texas tussle In Dallas council race, police politics divide Jewish community Barry Wernick and Jaynie Schultz Jaynie Schultz and Barry Wernick belong to the same Orthodox synagogue in Dallas, Texas. Growing up, Wernick got a scholarship from the Schultz family which helped fund his Jewish education. A few years ago, Schultz invested in a horror […]]]>


texas tussle

In Dallas council race, police politics divide Jewish community

Barry Wernick and Jaynie Schultz

Jaynie Schultz and Barry Wernick belong to the same Orthodox synagogue in Dallas, Texas. Growing up, Wernick got a scholarship from the Schultz family which helped fund his Jewish education. A few years ago, Schultz invested in a horror film that Wernick was producing. Their children attend the same Jewish school. Now they are running against each other for a spot on the Dallas City Council in an unexpectedly controversial race to be decided in a runoff on June 5 – after Wernick won 38% of the vote and Schultz won 36. % in the first round. Jewish insiderGabby Deutch, of Dallas, has spoken to both nominees as well as an array of personalities from the race community that threatens to fracture the tight-knit Jewish community in Dallas.

All politics are local: While the race is extremely local, it shows how some of the national political dynamics that have erupted over the past year can spill over into elections at other levels. Misinformation about both campaigns was disseminated by surrogates, supporters and black money groups; a conservative tries to portray his more liberal opponent as anti-police; and partisanship erupted in a surprisingly fierce manner. But since both candidates are members of Dallas’ tight-knit Jewish community, the campaign feels more personal than most. A local rabbi called the breed a “touchy subject in our community” and said Jewish insider that he was “having a difficult time talking to the media.”

Public security: “Safety and security is by far the biggest issue in our neighborhood, and Barry has done a really good job of lobbying this issue,” said Bruce Wilke, president of the Hillcrest-Forest Neighborhood Association, where Schultz and Wernick. Wilke does not intend to approve a candidate, since his organization is a non-profit organization. “It’s a fairly consistent and passionate race, more than I have seen in the past.

Dark Silver Mailers: Residents of the North Dallas neighborhood, in the heart of District 11, received letters last month from a black money group called Keep Dallas Safe, which called Schultz a “leftist radical committed to DEFUNDING the Police … Stands With RIOTS, LOOTERS and GANG MEMBERS. ” Wernick has denied any connection to Keep Dallas Safe, but he also did not condemn the senders. Her campaign also sent out mailers criticizing Schultz, using similar language and images that she says distorts her beliefs.

Pillar of the community: After graduating from the University of Texas at Austin and then earning a Masters in Urban Studies at the school’s Arlington campus, Schultz worked with his mother to create a small business retreat center to accommodate conferences and events. His connection to the Dallas Jewish community came naturally. “My family, which has been a very important philanthropic family here in Dallas, has invested in the local community, through day schools, through creating programs,” she explained. When her four children were under 10, she and her husband took in two Ethiopian boys who had to come to Dallas for surgery. One of the boys eventually returned to live with Schultz’s family when he was in high school, and he recently sent him a video – the 27-year-old works at a travel agency in Ethiopia – explaining why people should vote for her. In the race. “I was actually sitting at the polling station, and he messaged me on Facebook and said, ‘Ima, are you okay with me posting this? and I just started sobbing, ”Schultz noted, using the Hebrew word for mother.

Renaissance man: After studying in Russia, Wernick spent time in Israel, working with Russian and Ethiopian immigrants to help them acclimatize to Israeli society. Upon his return to Texas, he became involved in the Zionist Organization of America. Now Wernick is a practicing lawyer, but earlier in his career he tried acting. He shot commercials in New York City and for two and a half seasons he served as a replacement for the character of Mr. Big on “Sex and the City.” But Texas finally called Wernick home. “It was bucolic. Dallas had it all, ”he says. “That’s why I came back here 13 years ago to find my daughter from Texas.” He works full time as a lawyer, but also produces a film about the unsolved murder of his wife’s sister, who was 28 when she was killed 19 years ago.

To move on: Wernick and Schultz both told JI they didn’t expect the results of this race to root a permanent division in the community. “I would never hold it against anyone who voted against me, ever, and so I hope that when this election is over there will be no more division,” Schultz noted. Wernick echoed these sentiments: “It’s a political race. Whoever wins, wins; whoever loses, loses. We will not stop continuing together.

Read the full feature here.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/26/controversial-city-council-race-shakes-dallas-jewish-community/feed/ 0
Huge scenic paintings from the MGM Sistine Chapel on display at Texas Performing Arts – Sightlines https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/25/huge-scenic-paintings-from-the-mgm-sistine-chapel-on-display-at-texas-performing-arts-sightlines/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/25/huge-scenic-paintings-from-the-mgm-sistine-chapel-on-display-at-texas-performing-arts-sightlines/#respond Tue, 25 May 2021 17:26:15 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/25/huge-scenic-paintings-from-the-mgm-sistine-chapel-on-display-at-texas-performing-arts-sightlines/ After the hugely popular sold-out show of giant Hollywood backdrops earlier this year, Texas Performing Arts is back with another iteration from its collection of historic Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer backdrops. “Behind the Scenes: Hollywood’s Sistine Chapel” features 18 huge backdrops that are full-scale copies of historic Renaissance frescoes, including “The Last Judgment” by Michelangelo. The exhibition runs […]]]>


After the hugely popular sold-out show of giant Hollywood backdrops earlier this year, Texas Performing Arts is back with another iteration from its collection of historic Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer backdrops.

“Behind the Scenes: Hollywood’s Sistine Chapel” features 18 huge backdrops that are full-scale copies of historic Renaissance frescoes, including “The Last Judgment” by Michelangelo. The exhibition runs from June 26 to August 1, with timed tickets on sale at texasperformingarts.org

An MGM backdrop which is a replica of Michelangelo’s “Last Judgment” in the Sistine Chapel. The backdrop was used for the 1968 film “Fisherman’s Shoes”.

The sets were created for the 1968 MGM film “Fisherman’s Shoes”. Installed on the stage of the Bass Concert Hall, the exhibition will be the first public presentation of the entire Sistine Chapel suite.

As part of the Art Directors’ Guild which launched the Backdrop Recovery Project, in 2017, the Texas Performing Arts stage studio received 50 MGM backdrops which are used for the study of theater design students.

“It’s amazing that we have a life-size, hand-painted copy of the Sistine Chapel here at the University of Texas at Austin,” said Karen L. Maness, director of performing arts at Texas Performing Arts and a member of the corps. professor at the University of Texas. “It’s a masterpiece of Hollywood scenic artistic illusion. The exhibition on the Bass stage will delight both moviegoers and devotees.

The film tested the illusory prowess of MGM’s performing arts department. Denying access to the film in the Sistine Chapel, the Italy-based film crew requested an emergency response. Performing Arts Supervisor George Gibson brought together performing artists from across Hollywood, including competing movie studios, to complete this monumental task in three months.

Related: ‘The Art of the Hollywood Backdrop’ Shows Paintings at Work ‘

Their delusion was so convincing that the Catholic clergy were enraged at the film’s premiere, believing that the film crew had been allowed to film the actual Sistine Chapel. The film was a box office disappointment, but won Oscar nominations for Alex North for Best Score and George W. Davis and Edward C. Carfagno for Best Artistic Direction.



Source link

]]>
https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/25/huge-scenic-paintings-from-the-mgm-sistine-chapel-on-display-at-texas-performing-arts-sightlines/feed/ 0