European Civilization – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:57:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png European Civilization – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 The Chamber announces the winners of the 2021 awards https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/06/the-chamber-announces-the-winners-of-the-2021-awards/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:57:48 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/06/the-chamber-announces-the-winners-of-the-2021-awards/ Small Business of the Year – May Lick Dinner Bell The Maysville Area Chamber of Commerce recently announced the recipients of the 2021 Chamber Awards. For the first time in several years, the Chamber recognized exceptional businesses, organizations and community leaders. The nominees for Small Business of the Year, Large Business of the Year, New […]]]>

Small Business of the Year – May Lick Dinner Bell

The Maysville Area Chamber of Commerce recently announced the recipients of the 2021 Chamber Awards.

For the first time in several years, the Chamber recognized exceptional businesses, organizations and community leaders. The nominees for Small Business of the Year, Large Business of the Year, New Business of the Year and Nonprofit of the Year were chosen by the community. The nominees for House Champion and Citizen of the Year were selected by a small panel of community leaders.

The 2021 Chamber Award recipients were announced at the Chamber’s annual meeting in November.

Small Business of the Year Presented by Carmeuse Lime – May’s Lick Dinner Bell

Great Company of the Year presented by The Ledger Independent – STOBER Drives

New Company of the Year presented by East Kentucky Power – Local Kentucky 68

Nonprofit of the Year presented by Meadowview Regional Medical Center – Sprinkles of Hope

Chamber Champion presented by International Paper – Meagan Brannon

Citizen of the Year presented by WFTM – Rebecca Cartmell

“We are fortunate to have so many wonderful Chamber partners,” said Kaci Compton, executive director of the Maysville area Chamber. “Our candidate lists were full of the best in Maysville-Mason County. Our community submitted nearly 800 votes during the week-long voting period. It was a great experience that highlighted the great work our companies and organizations do every day.

In addition to the Chamber Excellence Awards, the Maysville Area Chamber recognized the Member’s Anniversary Awards. Members celebrating their 5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th, 40th and 60the Anniversaries with the Chamber of Commerce received certificates to recognize their respective milestones.

Five Birthdays – Mason County RSVP, Maysville Family Chiropractic, Superior Composites, The Modern Laundry Company, Turning Point Apostolic Church, VFW.

10 Year Anniversaries – Hinton Mills, Maysville Physiotherapy, Shoe Sensation.

15th Anniversary – Penn Station, Peoples Bank of Kentucky, Primary Plus.

20th Anniversary – Farm Credit Services, Ohio Valley Heart.

25th anniversary – American Business Systems, C&D Electronics, City of Maysville, Fox, Wood, Wood & Estill, French Quarter Inn, Green Tokai, Haney’s Hardware, Kentucky Gateway Museum Center, Laurel Oaks Golf Club, Maysville Materials, McDowell & Faris DMD, Rent-2-Own, Tire World, Bijoux Traxel, ION Center for Violence Prevention.

40th Anniversary – deSha’s Restaurant, Dr James E. Adams ,.

60th Anniversary – Assured Partners, Bank of Maysville, Clarke & Clarke, Attorneys, DeKalb Lodge # 12, Hardymons Home & Hardware, Kentucky Utilities, Knox & Brothers Funeral Home, Kroger, The Ledger Independent, Limestone Cablevision. Mason County Tax Court, Pepsi-Cola Bottling Company, Security Bank & Trust Company, Standard Tobacco Co., WFTM.

The Maysville-Mason County Regional Chamber of Commerce is a member-based organization that supports over 200 local businesses, organizations and individuals through education, advocacy and leadership. You can find out more about the Chamber and the 2021 Chamber award recipients at: www.maysvillechamber.com


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US-Japan Tech Cooperation Offers Comprehensive List of Opportunities in 2022 https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/04/us-japan-tech-cooperation-offers-comprehensive-list-of-opportunities-in-2022/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 23:19:59 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/04/us-japan-tech-cooperation-offers-comprehensive-list-of-opportunities-in-2022/ ~~ ~ In November 2021, the newly elected Japanese government followed through on Prime Minister Fumio Kishida’s plans to make Japan a global force in the semiconductor supply chain by approving approximately US $ 6.8 billion for the Japan’s national semiconductor industry. A large portion of these funds will go to finance the Sony and […]]]>

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Innovators in Japan develop new technologies to fight coronavirus

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In November 2021, the newly elected Japanese government followed through on Prime Minister Fumio Kishida’s plans to make Japan a global force in the semiconductor supply chain by approving approximately US $ 6.8 billion for the Japan’s national semiconductor industry. A large portion of these funds will go to finance the Sony and Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) factories in Kumamoto, Kyushu.

The initiative signals a change in Japanese policy in line with the government’s goals as set out in the 6e Basic plan for science, technology and innovation.

The Kishida government’s record spending on science and technology (S&T) research and development (R&D) demonstrates broad strategic alignment with long-standing U.S. technological and economic priorities in critical and emerging technologies. The resilience of the supply chain, the reliability of the basic technological infrastructure and the preservation of advanced technologies against threats such as theft of intellectual property from China are key elements.

As such, the growing strategic and economic implications of the relationship between the United States and Japan are expected to continue to play a larger role in the broader bilateral relationship as we move forward into 2022. Both sides anticipate the first face-to-face meeting between Prime Minister Kishida and President Joe Biden. in Washington earlier this year. Relationship watchers should be on the lookout for key developments at this time, and throughout the year, to assess how the S&T relationship continues to develop.

Prime Minister Fumio Kishida

First leaders meeting in Washington

Although Prime Minister Kishida briefly met President Biden on the sidelines of the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Glasgow, Scotland in November 2021, he has yet to make his first visit to Wsashington as Prime Minister.

Initial plans for the high-profile visit were pushed back to early 2022 due to lingering concerns over the COVID-19 pandemic. But when the two leaders finally meet in Washington, strengthening emerging technology cooperation between Washington and Tokyo should be part of their discussions.

In light of supply chain and production shortages, the two countries agreed to partner to improve secure semiconductor supply chains in a joint statement by President Biden and the then Prime Minister , Yoshihide Suga, in April 2021. Japan then moved to improve its own domestic production. capacities, although work remains to be done to reach its goal of catching up with Taiwanese and South Korean producers.

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company Limited (TSMC), Fab Building 5, Hsinchu Science Park, Taiwan (Pellden)

Biden and Kishida are expected to focus their discussion on securing supply chains and using common partners from third countries – such as Taiwan, which was mentioned in the April leaders’ statement – to strengthen coordination in the short term. . TSMC’s plans for the Kumamoto and US state of Arizona plants show that these types of commitments can be a positive development for both countries. The pursuit of coordinated progress on artificial intelligence (AI), the deployment of 5G, quantum information science (QIS), civil space cooperation and collaboration with the Quad, and the increase of their respective capacities in international organizations, should also be part of this meeting.

In order to ensure that leaders are properly briefed, the next session of the expected meeting of the High-Level Joint Committee (JHLC) on Science and Technology Cooperation should be called at an early date.

Strategic coordination on key priorities

The JHLC is a ministerial-level meeting of the highest-ranking science and technology officials of the two countries, established under the 1988 Agreement on Cooperation in Research and Development in Science and Technology. The committee traditionally meets every two years, but has not met since 2019.

Around this time, then MEXT Minister Masahiko Shibayama and Minister of State for Science and Technology Reform Takuya Hirai traveled to Washington, where they met their counterparts from the White House, the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) of the White House, Kelvin Droegemeier, and the head of the United States. Technology Officer Michael Kratsios.

The 2019 meeting was the first to be broken down into science and technology-specific strands. He helped shape subsequent discussions on emerging technologies between President Donald Trump and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on important issues of AI, QIS and space.

In order to ensure that the priorities of the United States and Japan on these critical and emerging technology issues remain coordinated, and to address emerging strategic issues such as supply chain shortages, supply chain threats, procurement and R&D intellectual property risks, the two governments should act quickly to convene the 15th JHLC in 2022.

Prime Minister Fumio Kishida, right, with Digital Minister Karen Makishima.

This iteration of the JHLC Ministerial Meeting is also the perfect opportunity for Minister Karen Makishima of the newly formed Digital Ministry to meet with her US counterparts on further digital collaboration. Behind the scenes, the Joint Working Level Committee met in June 2021 to help prepare for a potential JHLC and discuss issues such as AI and QIS. However, supply chain resilience was missing from the meeting reading.

Keeping the precedent of the technology-specific path adopted in its previous session, the upcoming JHLC is expected to place special emphasis on securing the semiconductor supply chain, coordination within multilateral organizations, and sharing of knowledge. objectives on the deployment of 5G, artificial intelligence (AI) and QIS. .

Within the non-defense limits of the JHLC format, the two partners should strengthen bilateral S&T coordination. This could be done by working independently of the Quad’s Critical and Emerging Technologies working groups.

Free World Standards

The first two leaders’ summits of the Quadrilateral Strategic Dialogue (Quad) in 2021 underscored the importance of coordinating technology policy between the United States, Japan, India and Australia. Technology-specific working groups are expected to continue to play a role in the development of open radio access networks (ORANs) as an alternative to Chinese dominance in the deployment of advanced telecommunications networks, including 5G.

Expect observers to closely monitor how the four countries coordinate at all levels in major international organizations to ensure that China-led totalitarian technology standards do not dominate 2022.

President Joe Biden heads to the Quad Summit with, left to right, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga on Friday, September 24, 2021, in Washington. (AP Photo / Evan Vucci)

Preventing China from taking over the presidency of the United Nations-led International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in 2022 should be a key priority for the United States and Japan, as well as other Quad nations and democratic countries. The move would deal a blow to China in its goal of implementing technology standards influenced by totalitarianism by 2035, and would also demonstrate enhanced cooperation between the United States and Japan on technology standards.

Other multilateral workflows to watch include the engagements with the Taiwanese by the United States and Japan regarding secure supply chains and semiconductor production.

Standing together in 2022

In November 2021, the 12th U.S.-Japan Internet Economy Political Cooperation Dialogue was held in Tokyo and included discussions on artificial intelligence, information technology and communications (ICT) and environmental promotion for innovative approaches to the next stages of the digital economy. , including the ORAN deployment.

Arming the Internet

The group also focused on the importance of US-Japan coordination regarding various international organizations, including ITU, another important venue to counter the implementation of China’s-led totalitarian technology standards. ITU is expected to elect a new leader in 2022.

In the April 2021 leaders’ statement, Prime Minister Suga and President Biden mentioned the importance of civil space cooperation between the two countries. As the Kishida government continues to develop its priorities in this area, the two countries are expected to convene the eighth meeting of the Bilateral Dialogue on Space Cooperation. The group has not met since August 2020. However, it can play an important role in helping Tokyo and Washington find the most effective means of cooperation in all areas of technological development and military and civilian applications of space technologies. in 2022.

Defense and the economy have traditionally dominated US-Japan relations, and for good reason. But the role of emerging technology cooperation between the two countries is playing an increasing role as they expand cooperation on technology issues. Both are seeking bilateral and multilateral solutions to counter China’s growing influence in the tech space, particularly at ITU.

The new Kishida government should seize the opportunity to engage with the United States on specific technology issues in 2022 at all levels of government to advance these goals. Hosting the next iteration of the JHLC would go a long way in boosting leadership and coordination at the working level on critical and emerging technology issues in the New Year.

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Author: Erik Jacobs


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Forging a New History, for a New Future – The Island https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/31/forging-a-new-history-for-a-new-future-the-island/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 23:32:48 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/31/forging-a-new-history-for-a-new-future-the-island/ By Uditha Devapriya For Sinhala nationalists, I dare say that the history of Sri Lanka remains the history of the Sinhala people. This raises two questions: first, who are these Sinhalese, and second, where does their story begin? The typical nationalist response to these would be, first, that the Sinhalese are the majority in the […]]]>

By Uditha Devapriya

For Sinhala nationalists, I dare say that the history of Sri Lanka remains the history of the Sinhala people. This raises two questions: first, who are these Sinhalese, and second, where does their story begin? The typical nationalist response to these would be, first, that the Sinhalese are the majority in the country, and second that their history begins with the advent of kinship as described in chronicles like the Mahavamsa.

But such answers ignore important historical considerations, such as whether the kings of Sri Lanka, or at least the first of them, were from India, or that the chronicles make reference to a civilization that is believed to be earlier. upon their arrival.

How do nationalists resolve these contradictions? They would probably argue that the island had a distinctly different and superior civilization to that which the kings spawned there, while conceding that the latter also developed the country. After all, there are important debates about historiography within nationalist circles, boiling down to whether we are to trace our ancestors to 2,500 years ago, to the colonization of the country by the Indo-Aryan tribes, or to 10 000 years ago, to the formation of a pre-Aryan Indian pre-civilization supposedly free from outside influences. Although there is no real archaeological evidence for the latter point of view, there is no shortage of popular writers who speculate that the Sinhalese are carriers of a culture that predates Indian influence.

It should be noted that the concept of race occupies a preponderant place in both cases. In fact, for Sinhala nationalists as well as Tamil nationalists, Muslims and others, race remains the primary consideration, the only priority. It is true that, as RALH Gunawardana noted, in European languages ​​the word race “only dates from the 16th century or so”, when neither Sinhala nor Tamil has a satisfactory equivalent for it. Yet for nationalists, history is at best a series of ethnic encounters. So whether they are talking about a prodigal son from northern India conquering the island of Tampabanni or a ten-headed king reigning on the island long before this son arrived, they are reducing the story. from the country to the history of a dominant group. This is essentialist scholarship at its crudest.

Nationalists, of course, can be flexible on these issues. They often are. For example, a prominent intellectual from Jathika Chintanaya claimed in a public seminar that the Nayakkar kings of Kandy could become Sinhala after being absorbed into the Sinhala social structure in the same way as Victoria, although she did not master not English, could become into an English queen. But for the same reasons, these intellectuals and commentators speak of terms like Sinhalathvaya as if they were set in stone. While they would readily accept that the Nayakkars became Sinhalese because they were kings and had to be benefactors or be seen as benefactors of Buddhism, they denied that Muslims could be absorbed into Sinhala social structures or take part in them. Sinhala rituals. According to their logic, “becoming” Sinhala is the prerogative of a ruling class which cannot be authorized for other groups.

The case of Wath Himi Kumaraya, known as Gale Bandara Deviyo, shows how this type of essentialism can blind us to the intricacies of our history. Although the records are not clear on its origins, what we can deduce is the account of a Muslim claimant to the throne killed by a group of nobles, only to be revered by followers of both Islam and of Buddhism. The transformation of a Muslim usurper into a popular deity is of course a fascinating historical anomaly in a deeply Sinhala and Buddhist kingdom, but one that seems to be appreciated by few, if at all. Certainly, a racist historiography would ignore or omit such details, while those who subscribe to such stories would ignore them: I realized this myself the other day when, after suggesting that Gale Bandara was “Muslim.” , a 19 year old boy passionately argued that Buddhists stop worshiping him!

I don’t know to what extent the local textbooks reinforce racist narratives of local history. I am sure, however, that these texts do not instill in their readers an appreciation of the many groups that form the identity of the country. Paradoxically, while reinforcing ethnic or religious supremacy, textbook accounts borrow concepts steeped in Western ideology. The notion of race is only one example, as is the origin of terms like Aryan, which had to do with the identity of a ruling class rather than a hegemonic ethnic community.

It is a paradox which does not bother writers who privilege the racial dimensions of history: even in their rejection of “Western” notions of multiethnic identity, they subscribe to other dominant “Western” notions, which are turn out to be so ubiquitous, if not all the more so. How to deal with such contradictions? How can we solve them? A good first step would be to historize and find out what can be done with them.

At the start of the 20th century, debates and controversies had begun to arise on questions of racial identity, territorial rights, ethnic distinctions, etc. Those who took part in these discussions fell back on the divisions that European philologists and orientalists had drawn between ethnic groups on the basis of certain characteristics such as dialect and type of dress.

What these reviews left aside, and scientific advances have enabled us to see today, are the commonalities that unite the communities. As obvious and common as some biological traits may be within communities, these by themselves, as Bandaranayake and Gunawardana have noted, do not in any way justify the use of categories like race, which are so fluid. that they cannot be used as markers of distinction.

Perhaps what gave credence to such essentialist views was the pattern that early historians adopted in their periodizations of local history. As in India, where colonial scholars made an arbitrary and imaginary distinction between classical Hindu and decadent Muslim phases, in Sri Lanka they drew lines between a pristine medieval culture and a decadent pre-colonial phase, the latter generally being identified with the Kandy period. kings. Other scholars have gone one step further in identifying not the kingdom of Kandy but colonial rule as decadent, in stark contrast to the Anuradhapura and Polonnaruwa periods.

Whatever the scholar’s prejudices have been, establishing chronological divisions in this sense has enabled popular writers to integrate their racist accounts of history into such patterns later, although history, as Senake Bandaranayake and RALH Gunawardana have shown it, rebelling against such timelines.

The biggest omission made by those who saw history as an ethnic struggle was the issue of caste, which remains the least understood social phenomenon in Sri Lanka. Pillars of the Marxist left, including Hector Abhayavardhana, made a foray into rural society at the height of the Suriya Mal and malaria campaigns of the 1930s, allowing researchers to examine social stratifications from a point of view materialistic view. Yet over the years, discussions of such stratifications have tended to fade.

For me, this is a striking omission. The intra-group differences are as important as the inter-group ones. They highlight the divisions that exist, not only at the racial level between communities, but also at the level of castes and classes, within the same communities.

For the most part, unfortunately, historians and writers, whether “Marxists”, liberals or nationalists, have ignored these considerations. This has led to a situation where, while rejecting the racist rhetoric of nationalists, liberal academics have fallen back on criteria that do not differ from those adopted by nationalist ideologues. Therefore, accounts of the contributions of Moors, Malays, Tamils ​​and even Burghers to Sri Lankan society value these communities from an ethnic perspective, portraying them as racial types against which the nationalists raise their claims of superiority. Whether they like it or not, then, the most progressive Sri Lankan academics provide ammunition for nationalist debates, given that they also see history through an ethnic lens. Perhaps the best example would be the notion of “Tamil Buddhism” in Sri Lanka, raised by sociologists, and the instinctive rejection of such a thesis by Sinhala nationalists.

I think the first step towards freeing Sri Lankan historiography from its fixation on ethnicity and racism would be, as Senake Bandaranayake noted, to view the history of ethnic formation in the country as a process. complex involving “the convergence of various pre and proto-historical elements. developments. On the one hand, nationalist historians persist in constructing a Sinhala Buddhist identity. On the other hand, the Liberals’ response frames the question in racial terms and takes up the criteria used by their opponents, thus legitimizing them. Both approaches lead to a dead end, and therefore both should be ruled out.

The solution, which makes perfect sense in my opinion, would be to start looking at history from the perspective of other social phenomena, such as caste. In doing so, we will be able to arrive at a historiography emphasizing the differences which separate groups as much as on the commonalities which unite them. To quote Senake Bandaranayake here, “[a] Studying the history of Sri Lanka, stripped of its myths and distortions and free from communalist biases on one side or the other, can do a lot to contribute to the historical process of nation-building. modern integrated polyethnic. We obviously have a long way to go.

The author can be contacted at udakdev1@gmail.com


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First victim of Bronze Age supereruption found in Turkey https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/30/first-victim-of-bronze-age-supereruption-found-in-turkey/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 13:24:28 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/30/first-victim-of-bronze-age-supereruption-found-in-turkey/ The island of Santorini is essentially what remains after a massive volcanic explosion in the … [+] southern Aegean Sea. NASA / GSFC / METI / ERSDAC / JAROS / ASTER scientific team The skeletal remains of a victim of the prehistoric Thera eruption have been found on a shore in Cesme Bay, western Turkey. […]]]>

The skeletal remains of a victim of the prehistoric Thera eruption have been found on a shore in Cesme Bay, western Turkey. Archaeological evidence suggests the young man was killed when a series of tsunamis triggered by the eruption and collapse of the Thera volcano on the modern island of Santorini in the southern Aegean Sea, according to Turkish and Israeli researchers. , flooded the coastal areas around the western Mediterranean Sea.

Santorini is basically what’s left after a massive volcanic explosion that destroyed the first settlements on what was once a single island and created the current caldera surrounded by a ring of small islands. Such a flooded caldera is formed when a volcano empties its magma chamber during a violent eruption and the overlying mountain collapses.

The effects on people and society of the supereruption that created Santorini 3,600 years ago, possibly one of the most violent volcanic eruptions in European history, are still hotly debated today.

In 1930, the Greek archaeologist Spyridon Marinatos discovered the remains of the ancient port city of Santorini, named Akrotiri, buried under volcanic deposits. Archaeological excavations have revealed that Akrotiri was an import outpost of Minoan culture. As in Pompeii, volcanic deposits have preserved the city, however, unlike Pompeii, no body has been found.

Perhaps the seismic activity preceding the eruption scared people never to return. Carbon dating of burnt wood recovered from the ruins gives a date for the eruption of 1600-1627 BCE. The eruption was so violent that it generated a series of tsunami waves, likely ending Minoan civilization on the neighboring island of Crete and inundating shores hundreds of miles away in Egypt and Turkey. Some authors have suggested that the widespread destruction caused by the volcano inspired the myth of Atlantis.

The skeleton was found buried under a mixture of volcanic ash, sand, seashells and rubble, and the location of the body suggests the man was pushed against a wall by the force of the water before drowning . Scientists also found the bones of a dog lying nearby under collapsed stones. Radiocarbon dating of the remains gives an age of 1612 BCE, coinciding with the Thera eruption.

By studying the layers of ash found at the excavation site, the researchers conclude that Thera erupted for about two weeks, generating at least four tsunamis, with waves 4 to 5 meters high. The tsunamis were separated by hours or even days, perhaps allowing for a few rescue attempts, according to the authors. They found evidence that people tried to clear the rubble and dig in the tsunami deposits, possibly in an attempt to locate the survivors.

The research is published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.


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Wccftech’s best strategy and simulation games in 2021 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/28/wccftechs-best-strategy-and-simulation-games-in-2021/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 18:00:38 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/28/wccftechs-best-strategy-and-simulation-games-in-2021/ Starting this piece is difficult because it is impossible not to mention the issues of the world. I was very optimistic when I thought people would face COVID for another six months when I wrote this list’s version of last year. Since the Omicron is more heritable than any other variant, we could face months […]]]>

Starting this piece is difficult because it is impossible not to mention the issues of the world. I was very optimistic when I thought people would face COVID for another six months when I wrote this list’s version of last year. Since the Omicron is more heritable than any other variant, we could face months of uncertainty now. Even more, if the morons refuse to be vaccinated and allow more strains and mutations to use their bodies as a petri dish. Alas, I don’t have the same control that strategy and simulation games give me, so we can’t fix the stupid ones.

What I can do, however, is tell you the best strategy and simulation games released in 2021. Just like the lists from previous years (Strategy: 2016, 2017. Simulation: 2016, 2017. Strategy and simulation: 2018 , 2019, 2020), there are a few rules that we follow. Only new and released titles can qualify for the roster, which means no Hardspace: Shipbreaker (still in Early Access) or Total War: Rome Remastered (re-release). Of course, only games that have been played will appear, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they all have a review on the site.

Wccftech’s Best Platform Games of 2021 – Soar Through Dimensions and Expectations

I have no doubt that I missed some games, and you could definitely make a case for including Jurassic World Evolution 2, Evil Genius 2, and more. Please feel free to mention any titles that you think should be included below, as there’s also a good chance that I – or someone else – haven’t played it yet. One of those examples, which I want to come back to soon, is “This is the president”.

On that note, enjoy the rest of 2021. Here’s a big 2022, with a list of most anticipated games to come. Don’t forget to vote for your favorite from the list at the end of this article!

Also in Wccftech’s best games lists for 2021: Fighting, Platform

Kind: Simulation. Platforms: PC (coming to 2022 consoles).

Best Wccftech Fighting Games of 2021 – Demons, Beasts and the Glory of Rollback Netcode

Welcome to the odd entry on the list. I mentioned in the podcast a few times that I played hell still in love with this game, and I did. Like so many similar simulation games, Gas Station Simulator is janky, it’s definitely not the most engaging game, and it can be somewhat ruthless. However, where many games are just that, it manages to go above and beyond, becoming a truly addicting title.

Whether it’s filling cars and renovating different areas of your Route 66 station, stocking shelves, and improving the checkout experience for your customers, there’s a lot to do. You also need to make sure your station doesn’t get too dirty as you sweep, wash the walls after a little bastard vandalizes them, take out the trash, and much more. Gas Station Simulation is without a doubt one of the best simulation games I’ve ever played, and it keeps things weird – like these games always do – with the inclusion of mobs, aliens and other mini-games and random events.

Humanity (8/10)

Kind: Strategy (4X). Platform: PC.

It’s virtually impossible now to put together a list of the best strategy games in a given year without including SEGA. With such a wealth of exceptional strategy studios, each year brings something special for fans of the genre like me. When I first saw it, humanity immediately caught my interest. A Civilization-style 4X game from the developers of Endless Space? I’m in.

Humanity is a great game, and it manages to stand out from civilization, though specific issues prevent it from being a civilization killer. While aspects like religion, and AI in general, needed improvement, it’s impossible not to love how the progression of your empire is handled, how cities and regions develop, and how many details there are in this game.

Here is the summary of my opinion:

Humankind is a very interesting 4X strategy game with a wide variety of elements, most of which are very detailed – although some, like religion, can feel a bit undercooked. From city building to urban expansion and sprawl over time, much of the world’s development is well represented here. Science, influence, war, economy, growth – there’s very little you’ll find covered here.

Age of Empires IV (9/10)

Kind: Strategy (Real-time strategy). Platform: PC.

Although a game published and funded by Microsoft, Age of Empires IV comes to you from another SEGA studio: Relic Entertainment, assisted by future franchise custodians, World’s Edge. One of my games of the year, it’s a solid throwback to one of the greatest franchises in strategy history, and the way it turned out is nothing but fantastic.

Simple, easy to access, yet offering a solid challenge, Age of Empires IV takes traditional gameplay forward without straying too far, feeling like a true sequel. Along with great gameplay, the campaign offers a host of documentary-style lessons that immerse you in the battles you are about to fight. For strategy players and history buffs, you can’t go wrong here.

Here is what I put for the summary of my review of Age of Empires IV:

Age of Empires IV is, in almost every way, a true sequel to Age of Empires II. It plays great and has a few new features that add more tactical elements to combat and the way you develop your faction. On factions, it really allows them to differentiate themselves from each other. There are slight issues, such as the population cap which seems very restrictive and the inferior quality of the unit models, but these are minor in what is an otherwise exceptional game, and in which an undeniable amount of ‘effort and work has gone into – which includes hours of documentary-style clips to support the campaign.

Kind: Simulation. Platforms: PC, PS4, PS5, Xbox One, Xbox Series S / X.

Did you have to give a series the mantle of being the pinnacle of the simulation genre? Farming Simulator would be difficult to rule out. This series has been around since 2008, alternating between main entrances and mobile entrances, and has generated enormous success during this time. Farming Simulator 22 takes the series to the next level, including seasons, production lines, and more.

While it’s never the easiest to tackle, and some gameplay tweaks – even revisions – are now long overdue – there are still very few other similar games on the market in terms of production quality. and a substantial modding scene that only makes what you have got even better.

Football Manager 2022 (9.5 / 10)

Why is it on the list? Because it’s fantastic. Am I going to tell you more? Yes. When? Not now. Wait for the best list of sports and racing games.

Strategy and Simulation Games 2021 – Year in Review

After a few great years, the Simulation genre has seen a downturn when it comes to your top “AAA” developers and publishers. Fortunately, publishers like PlayWay and MovieGames are here for you if you’re a fan of somewhat realistic or quirky simulation titles. It’s also especially true that these titles, often developed by smaller studios in Eastern Europe, improve dramatically over time and as they come out.

Even the strategy game has seen a kind of slowdown. However, I would still say that strategy games – especially grand strategy and 4X titles – need a lot more testing. As such, factors related to working from home and other impacts of the pandemic have caused delays among headlines. A basic example could be Total War: Warhammer III, delayed from 2021 to early 2022.

Honorable mentions:

Best Strategy / Simulation Game of 2021


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6,000-year-old grave in England reveals oldest known family tree in the world https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/25/6000-year-old-grave-in-england-reveals-oldest-known-family-tree-in-the-world/ Sat, 25 Dec 2021 02:27:39 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/25/6000-year-old-grave-in-england-reveals-oldest-known-family-tree-in-the-world/ Using DNA, experts discovered the corpses of 27 family members in a grave approximately 6,000 years old. The tomb was discovered in England, indicating direct descendants of five generations, through a man and four women. The discovery of the 6,000-year-old tomb The findings imply that polygamous marriages existed at the highest levels of Neolithic society, […]]]>

Using DNA, experts discovered the corpses of 27 family members in a grave approximately 6,000 years old. The tomb was discovered in England, indicating direct descendants of five generations, through a man and four women.

The discovery of the 6,000-year-old tomb

The findings imply that polygamous marriages existed at the highest levels of Neolithic society, as scientists believe it is unlikely that prehistoric man had four successive wives. On the contrary, he presumably had more than one partner simultaneously.

However, the burial chamber was divided into two L-shaped compartments, located to the north and south of the frame, and in which the individuals were buried leaned on the ladies of the first generation from which they came, the deceased of two of the women. were buried in the northern enclosure, and the heirs of the other two women were buried in the southern enclosure.

Two of the lineage daughters who actually died as children were buried in the mausoleum, yet no older women of the lineage were submerged there.

They could be placed in the family graves of their husbands, according to Olalde.

He believes the woman was married to men buried in the tomb but had no children or only adult children who were later buried elsewhere.

While the Neolithic tombs of the European Union do not exhibit such ambiguity, Olalde believes that the ties between those entombed in Hazleton North’s tomb reflect many earlier lineage systems within immigrant civilization.

According to Olalde, this finding indicated that these 1st generation women were also clearly relevant in their society and that their prestige was accepted during the construction of the burial chamber.

“These stepchildren could be adopted into the home when their parents merged it,” he joked.

Yet it was also possible that the woman would also have children of men outside the home who were not accepted as spouses.

Also Read: 41,000 Years Ago Auroras Were Visible In The Equator Due To Geomagnetic Disturbance

The oldest known family tree in the world

Olalde also described four men buried in the grave whose parents were lineage members but whose fathers were not. These men were nicknamed the “stepchildren of the four brothers”.

This discovery proposed that ancestry was highly patriarchal, meaning that future generations buried in the mausoleum were linked to the ancient era through their male members, according to investigators. They also found evidence of three women and five men who had no biological connection to the household in the same mausoleum.

The significance of the five unassociated men is unknown, although they may have been adopted into the household or linked by ties that cannot be determined biologically, according to Olalde.

Hazleton North’s burial chamber dates from the Premature Neolithic period in England, and it is likely that those buried there came to Britain from mainland Europe as part of a wave of Neolithic landowners in the period, he told reporters.

The tumulus, or burial berm, stood in a paddy field where millennia of barrels fought to completely ruin it, so archaeologists excavated to conserve what was left, according to Olalde.

“This study is important because it is the first large family tree that we have had since ancient times,” he explained.

Also read: ‘Doomsday Glacier’ Almost the Size of Florida Could End in 3 Years Due to Global Warming

© 2021 NatureWorldNews.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


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The Helsinki Interfaith Peace Initiative https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/23/the-helsinki-interfaith-peace-initiative/ Thu, 23 Dec 2021 04:40:45 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/23/the-helsinki-interfaith-peace-initiative/ Tengyart / Unsplash Friends who dwell on the earth, For almost two years now, I have been dean of the new and growing theological school. Our goal is to help believers develop platforms to become public theologians in their particular contexts. In the midst of this work, I received an email from a Lutheran pastor […]]]>

Tengyart / Unsplash

Friends who dwell on the earth,

For almost two years now, I have been dean of the new and growing theological school. Our goal is to help believers develop platforms to become public theologians in their particular contexts. In the midst of this work, I received an email from a Lutheran pastor in Latvia named, Rev. Pavel Levushkan. For several months, we have had the opportunity to get to know each other. In each of our interactions, Reverend Levushkan urged me to pray for his country and the region at large as they struggle to cope between the growing conflict between the West and Russia… especially in Ukraine. As the drums of war begin to beat in Eastern Europe, I am determined to stand with my student, Reverend Levushkan, for peace. To this end, I have the pleasure of joining the Helsinki Interfaith Peace Initiative… so that ours is a world that knows more than rumors and constant updates of wars.

I would like to share some of the founding words of the Initiative …

The Initiative sees it as our duty to awaken the responsibility of people, both ordinary citizens and those in positions of authority. The standard of conduct in these difficult times must be responsibility for the fate of our planet, for what we leave of the world for our children and grandchildren. And this is impossible if one is deprived of a moral and spiritual core.

Our initiative is aimed at all people of good will, whatever their religion. Our goal is to awaken the potential for pacification inherent in every religion. Believers must say “No! To the impending catastrophe, which is the fault of myopic politicians obsessed with their personal ambitions.

It is time to build bridges of friendship and understanding between divided nations, ideologies and religions. Before it is too late. Judging by the reckless statements of those responsible (or rather irresponsible), the shadow of nuclear Armageddon is already hanging over mankind.

In this situation, the voice of the religious community is more important than ever. Our Lord and Savior called us to be peacemakers. “Blessed are the peacemakers: they will be called children of God. “(Matthew 5: 9)

Believers seek peace because God calls us to it, and not for political or other purposes. We can afford to speak the truth openly and without regard to faces, for “there is only one Lawgiver and Judge over us, who decides who to save and who to punish” (James 4:12)

Our call to Christian believers and all people of good will of all faiths and world views is to turn to their deepest roots of wisdom to jointly seek solutions to the crisis of civilization and to prevent another Cold War or even hot and to stop the existing conflicts on the European continent.

Our method is the Golden Rule of Compassion, which we find in the Gospel: “Do to others what you would like them to do to you. (Luke 6:31 BTI)

Our practice is to offer prayers, meditations, panel discussions and conferences together where believers will collectively seek guidance from God and offer this wisdom as a pacifying response to society.

The best response to a military threat is to avoid killing people at all costs. “Avoid evil and do good, seek peace and strive for it” (Psalms 33:15)

Our participants are leading experts, religious figures, writers, journalists, political scientists from Russia, Ukraine, the Baltic States, Western and Eastern Europe.

On January 1, World Peace Day of Prayers, an international holiday in which believers call on God to end all wars and send peace to people on Earth, the presentation of the Peace Initiative will take place. interfaith in Helsinki.

In the coming days, there will be more opportunities to get involved in the Initiative. I’ll keep you up-to-date. For now, I ask you to join me in prayer that Eastern Europe and the rest of the world will experience peace. In this particularly holy time of the year, may we stand with the angels of Bethlehem and declare with all our might …

“Glory to God in the highest heavens, and peace on earth …”

Truly… may we be found faithful to such a call…

Reverend Jeff Hood

22 December 2021


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Black Spartacus, Ledgers and Bell Hooks https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/21/black-spartacus-ledgers-and-bell-hooks/ Tue, 21 Dec 2021 13:36:31 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/21/black-spartacus-ledgers-and-bell-hooks/ Imagine the black Spartacus (Hyperallergic)by Sarah E. BondHow could abolitionists explain the Haitian revolution in sympathetic terms to a deeply racist white European and American audience? It suffices to graft its history on tales from ancient Rome. Would the end of the “big books” course be a tragedy? (The New Yorker)by Louis MenandFor some educators, […]]]>

Imagine the black Spartacus (Hyperallergic)
by Sarah E. Bond
How could abolitionists explain the Haitian revolution in sympathetic terms to a deeply racist white European and American audience? It suffices to graft its history on tales from ancient Rome.

Would the end of the “big books” course be a tragedy? (The New Yorker)
by Louis Menand
For some educators, the decline of college courses focused on the great works of Western civilization is a sign that universities are sliding into a crass careerist mentality. Yet these courses have in fact evolved in tandem with the university of practical research.

Remember the bell hooks (The Guardian)
by Reni Eddo-Lodge, David Olusoga, Jay Bernard, Johny Pitts, Jeffrey Boakye, Margaret Atwood, Candice Carty-Williams, Aminatta Forna, Afua Hirsch
The disappearance of the doorbell hooks leaves behind generations of writers, activists and thinkers influenced by its work. For many of them, what stands out is his blend of intellectual rigor and unabashed love.

A road is also a barrier (Infinite time)
by Darryl Jones
Roads connect humans, but they also break ecosystems. Fortunately, people around the world are developing innovative systems to help creatures bypass these dangers, from “frog tunnels” to opossum rope ladders.

Meet the first “real” centipede (Atlantic)
by Haley Weiss
It is a disappointing fact that centipedes typically have much less than 1,000 legs. But a new species surprised scientists with 1,306 outperformers. What does it do with them all? And how do researchers go about counting them, anyway?

Got any great advice on a well-researched story that belongs on this list? Write to us here.


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Monthly review | “A Radical History” of State Formation, Punishment Regimes, and the Landscape of Work in the United States (“The Punishment Monopoly” reviewed by the Society for the Anthropology of Work) https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/19/monthly-review-a-radical-history-of-state-formation-punishment-regimes-and-the-landscape-of-work-in-the-united-states-the-punishment-monopoly-reviewed-by-the/ Sun, 19 Dec 2021 20:11:44 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/19/monthly-review-a-radical-history-of-state-formation-punishment-regimes-and-the-landscape-of-work-in-the-united-states-the-punishment-monopoly-reviewed-by-the/ The monopoly of punishment:Tales of my ancestors, dispossession andUnited States BuildingThrough Pem Davidson Buck384 pages, $ 23 paper, 978-1-58367-832-9 Reviewed by Amanda J. Reinke Weaving the accounts of the author’s (probable) ancestors with historical evidence and theories of power and punishment, Pem Davidson Buck’s The monopoly of punishment is a thought-provoking examination of how the […]]]>

The monopoly of punishment:
Tales of my ancestors, dispossession and
United States Building

Through Pem Davidson Buck
384 pages, $ 23 paper, 978-1-58367-832-9

Reviewed by Amanda J. Reinke

Weaving the accounts of the author’s (probable) ancestors with historical evidence and theories of power and punishment, Pem Davidson Buck’s The monopoly of punishment is a thought-provoking examination of how the United States, a nation-state that purports to promote freedom and equality, centralized oppression and domination in a way that secured the lives and livelihoods of an elite . Using primary documents and accounts of ancestors of white settlers, enslaved and liberated African populations, and indigenous groups, Buck links the centrality of coercion and dispossession in the historic building of the state as such to contemporary issues such as mass incarceration and the privatization of prisons.

The monopoly of punishment explores the function of land as a means of production and a site for the social construction of power, paying attention to the racial and gender dimensions of land ownership and the authority it confers to punish non-elites.

Buck draws on the theoretical contributions of a variety of academics, including Michel Foucault (1977) and Charles Tilly (1985) to argue that accumulation by dispossession (cf. Harvey 2003) has been strategically constructed and applied as a form of daily violence both by religion and by moral, emotional, social, economic and physical punishments. According to Buck, “The state must punish in order to be a state and, ultimately, that is what states and the force they control are for: to protect the ability of the few to put people in control. place so that they have no choice but to give back to them the value of the work they do ”(p. 14).

In Weberian fashion, Buck defines the state as that institution which has “the legitimate right to exert force both in relation to its borders and in relation to its inhabitants” (p. 17), often in a striking manner ( eg hanging) but also in ways that are made invisible to elites (eg colluding with religious authorities to shape the gender dimensions of work). Buck reveals how subordinate populations are cast into the role of enemies who exist as “a dangerous cancer in the body politic, eating away at the health of the community from within” (p. 197). The foundation is thus laid for the punishment of state transgression, culminating in dispossession and the shift to wage labor – developments that affect not only women and poor white settlers, but also slaves and indigenous peoples.

When she can gather historical evidence, Buck uses her own family line to trace these developments to several locations in the United States. For example, it highlights the evolution of land ownership during colonial times in Virginia from a regime based on subsistence and the production of goods to one based on private property as the engine of accumulation by dispossession. . Access to “patented land”, for which small farmers could pay a one-time royalty, was removed and annual rent payments to the Crown were introduced. With the elimination of patented land opportunities, Buck said, white settlers could only acquire property through purchase. The lands at their disposal were generally located on the fringes of colonial territories and inhabited by indigenous peoples, which means that they were considered “dangerous”. A land that was “safe”, however, “was now entirely subject to the dictates of capitalism” (p. 147).

A second driver of accumulation by dispossession, in Buck’s analysis, was the need for exploitable labor. The creation of populations that had no choice but to work – or an extremely constrained set of choices – was mandatory to consolidate state power. Over time, the right to punish individuals for transgressions has shifted from local levels to a more distant state, transforming the intersectional experiences of those being punished.

Throughout the text, Buck provides historical evidence – although the precision of the evidence he collects varies – attesting to the gendered and racial dimensions of dispossession. In the early 1800s, the wives of white settlers, under pressure from the state and religious teachings, aligned themselves with a cult of domesticity, accepting their “moral and spiritual superiority over men in return for dispossession and of concealment ”(p. 232). Notions of masculinity, previously defined by land ownership and control of the means of production, have been reframed so that “a man can be an honorable householder while being dispossessed of the land”, which means that masculinity was defined by the simple “owner”.[ship] goods ”(p. 232). Within such a regime, women were punished for transgression by spectacular displays of violence and terror (eg, witchcraft trials) and punished for transgressions by their families. More and more white men are sent to penitentiaries, which become places of production of goods.

Meanwhile, so-called civilization projects targeting indigenous peoples also sought to relegate indigenous women to what the colonizing state saw as appropriate roles within a gender division of labor. For example, Cherokee women were ordered to relinquish their central role in family food production and “become dependent on men to provide them with food and shelter.” . . They would have no independent access to the means of production ”(p. 213-14).

The emerging administrative apparatuses of punishment are discussed in the final chapter of the book, relating historical models of state formation, power, and control to contemporary issues. The amount of care or control that individuals receive from the state varies depending on their willingness to comply. In the 18th century, for example, the first European colonies in Kentucky reformed their penal codes so that petty crimes no longer resulted in hanging. Instead, whites in conflict with the law “were to be put to work, and their work was to benefit the state” (p. 252), while slaves were subject to the punishment of their “owners” or church leaders. Kentucky’s first penitentiary opened in 1800 and was a visible reminder of the state’s power to determine who would live a “nonfree life” (p. 254) and for how long. If state care can be administered publicly, coercion can be insidious, masked by everyday forms of violence (cf. Scheper-Hughes 1993) that allow the state to maintain its legitimacy. This violence hides behind the ruse of public order but comes to constitute a “ghost prison state” (Beckett and Murakawa 2012), where control and coercion are multiplied by civil and administrative means.

For readers who expect a clear and meticulously precise family narrative, disappointment awaits; indeed, Buck discusses the difficulty of discovering clear family lines.

But that’s not the point of the book. Instead, using possible ancestral lines as a basis for inquiry, the author explores the potentials of her family history through known facts about the dimensions of power and inequality in the socio-political and economic landscapes of the world. ‘era. Yet the text leaves me with lingering questions about how the nature of state power has led to elite technologies hampering the poor’s access to the means of production. What particular roles, for example, have an increasing number of bureaucratic hurdles, title and deed requirements, and land use policies played over time?

the The monopoly of punishment is appropriate for a wide range of audiences, from senior undergraduates who learn about coercive labor and punishment, to criminal justice activists, to scholars retracing stories of punishment and labor. A radical story told from the 1600s to the present day, Buck’s work is beautifully rendered in accessible prose as he assembles primary documents with theoretical arguments to tell the story of state formation, punishment regimes and of the labor landscape in the United States. .

You can read the full review on Society for the Anthropology of Work


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Meet Temple’s New Associate Professors in the Department of Africa and African American Studies https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/14/meet-temples-new-associate-professors-in-the-department-of-africa-and-african-american-studies/ Tue, 14 Dec 2021 22:27:20 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/14/meet-temples-new-associate-professors-in-the-department-of-africa-and-african-american-studies/ This fall, Temple welcomed four new associate professors to the Department of Africa and African American Studies at the College of Liberal Arts. The department emerged over 40 years ago during the Black Power movement. Black students at Temple advocated for a department of Black Studies to address racism, discrimination and oppression. It is one […]]]>

This fall, Temple welcomed four new associate professors to the Department of Africa and African American Studies at the College of Liberal Arts. The department emerged over 40 years ago during the Black Power movement. Black students at Temple advocated for a department of Black Studies to address racism, discrimination and oppression. It is one of the oldest departments of its kind in the country and the first to offer a doctoral program.

The new African-American and African-American Studies faculty members are world-class faculty who have traveled the world, honing their craft as innovative and engaged educators. Get to know this energetic group of new teachers.

Ifetayo flannery (Photograph by Joseph V. Labolito)
Assistant professor | Africology and African-American Studies
Birthplace: Atlanta | we
Previous university: San Francisco State University

Temple Now: Why did you choose to teach at Temple?

Ifetayo Flannery: I always feel the excitement of working at Temple because everyone knows this is the heart of Philadelphia. They are very accessible and connected in a real way to the daily and urgent problems of our city and our society. Temple’s Department of Africa and African American Studies is at the forefront of innovative faculty research, producing top-notch doctoral students. These are the best three, if not number one, the best places for faculty or students in my field.

“Everyone knows Temple is the heart of Philadelphia. ”

– —Ifetayo Flannery, Assistant Professor of Africa and African-American Studies

TN: What courses and fields do you specialize in?
IF: I have been studying and working on black psychology for several years. The field was created by a group of academics in 1968, when they formed the Association of Black Psychologists in the [San Francisco] Bay Area – and parallels the development of African studies and African American studies. They are psychologists of all kinds who decided that they wanted to approach mental health, consciousness and the culture of memory from a completely different angle in their training. There is an intention in black psychology to develop analyzes and interpretations of the culture and behavior of people from the perspective of understanding African culture and behavior as normal. I also study the cultural coding of the African Diaspora in relation to their African ancestors so that I can interpret African American and African lives in a context that makes sense and adds meaning to people’s daily lives.

TN: How has your travel experience in different countries helped you in your career?
IF: I think that is changing [it], the difference between reading things in a book and then seeing things and talking to people in other parts of the world. Having been to Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica and Brazil, I have learned how Afro-Latinos and Afro-Brazilians make sense of their world and how it contributes to our collective psychology. I spent time in Nigeria specifically to research the impact of Yoruba culture and cosmology on the formation of practices in the African Diaspora. Traveling has done a lot for me in terms of business, personal relationships and just being a citizen of the world.


Kimani Nehusi (Photograph by Joseph V. Labolito)
Associate professor | Africology and African-American Studies
Birthplace: Queenstown | Guyana
Former university: University of East London

TN: Why did you choose to teach at Temple?
Kimani Nehusi: I did not choose Temple, Temple chose me. I was invited to join the Department of Africa and African American Studies. However, it is quite likely that I would have ended up here had I had the choice, since the department is the world leader in the development and application – through scholarship and activism – of Africanology. , which is the study of African phenomena, both transcontinental and transgenerational, from an African point of view.

TN: What courses and fields do you specialize in?
KN: I have taught several courses. The main ones are: the history and importance of race in America, the language and society in West Africa, the black child and the main seminary at the undergraduate level and the African civilization and the Egyptian language old graduate level. My areas of specialization are the history and culture of the African world; the languages ​​of the Caribbean and ancient Egypt; and topics such as carnival, libation, language and language issues, names and denominations, education and socialization.

TN: What is the accomplishment of your career that you are most proud of?
KN: The acquisition of a certain mastery of the ancient Egyptian language and the understanding of its application to African phenomena.


Reynaldo anderson (Photograph by Joseph V. Labolito)
Associate professor | Africology and African-American Studies
Birthplace: Okinawa | Japan
Previous university: Harris-Stowe State University

TN: Where did you spend your time growing up?

Reynaldo Anderson: I was born in Okinawa, Japan, and spent time in Idaho, Texas, Ohio, Virginia, and then Maryland. My father was a military intelligence officer in the Air Force during the Vietnam War. My grandfather served in the Korean War. I completed my high school education in Cheverly, Maryland. Then I got my undergraduate degree in Jackson State, my Masters in Oklahoma State, and my PhD in Nebraska.[Lincoln]. Also, I have some military service with the [U.S.] Marine Corps and I served in the Cold War.

TN: What courses and fields do you specialize in?
RA: I teach a course on contemporary black poets, mass media and the black community. And next semester, I’ll be teaching theory and methods of African American studies and a course on Afrofuturism. Afrofuturism is the story of African peoples around the world interpreted through a speculative lens by speculators. Some people might use science fiction along with technology, philosophy, and history. As these countries and societies continue to grow in the world, they will also be affected by factors such as climate change, technological acceleration and other phenomena. And historically, these populations are under-studied. However, it is an emerging field of study with this intersection of culture with science and politics. It is the attraction for many different applications that people are involved in, such as cultural production, the arts, visual arts, music, philosophy and digital humanities.

TN: Why did you choose to teach at Temple?
RA: This department is the number one in this area of ​​Africa and African American studies and I admire Dr. [Molefi Kete] Asante’s work.


No Dove (Photograph by Joseph V. Labolito)
Assistant professor | Africology and African-American Studies
Birthplace: London | UK

TN: Where did you spend your time growing up?
No Dove: My father is African and from Ghana and my mother is European and from UK. I spent my formative years in West Africa and the UK
What courses and fields do you specialize in? I teach undergraduates about the black woman, the black child, and the black family. Graduate courses are the African American Woman Seminar, Ethnographic Research, and The Theories and Methods of African American Studies.

TN: What are your main responsibilities in your current role at Temple?
ND: I have developed programs based on ancient African principles that display the truth about the history of Africa, which is the cradle of humanity. I bring the point of view of an African woman who is adopted by Africology, but my role is to really highlight the African woman who has disappeared in history. What is different about Africology is that we recognize and embrace our cultural history. We take it very seriously that culture is essential not only to the ability of all humans to exist, but that it can be used academically as an analytical tool. My job is to bring the African woman back into history. The humanity of African women has suffered debasement, especially women with the darkest skin. My position is to uplift, learn and teach who these women really are and what they have contributed to humanity.

TN: What is your greatest professional achievement?
ND: Working in the Department of Africa and African American Studies at Temple. It is the center of change in the world. Africology is culturally based and built on the love of Africa and African humanity. Dr. [Molefi Kete] Asante is an inspiration, a wonderful guide and educator. There is nowhere else in the world that I would rather be.


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