Classical Learning – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Fri, 04 Jun 2021 22:56:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Classical Learning – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 Arts + Entertainment – Fort Bragg Advocate-News https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/arts-entertainment-fort-bragg-advocate-news/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/arts-entertainment-fort-bragg-advocate-news/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 20:47:09 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/arts-entertainment-fort-bragg-advocate-news/ Kwan Tai Temple On Saturday June 5 and Sunday June 6, the Kwan Tai temple in downtown Mendocino invites all families to a free treasure hunt for children. Listen to the free guided tour, then have the kids go on a scavenger hunt for a reward. Kwan Tai Temple, California Historic Landmark # 927, is […]]]>


Kwan Tai Temple

On Saturday June 5 and Sunday June 6, the Kwan Tai temple in downtown Mendocino invites all families to a free treasure hunt for children. Listen to the free guided tour, then have the kids go on a scavenger hunt for a reward. Kwan Tai Temple, California Historic Landmark # 927, is located at 45160 Albion St. They offer free guided tours from May to October, Saturdays from noon to 3 p.m. and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Confabulations at the Willits Center for the Arts

The Willits Center for the arts presents Gail Rushmore and Daphne Alexander in Confabulations, A Mash-Up of Made-Up Memories.

Daphne Alexander has supported the WCA for years, donating at auctions and placing works in group shows. From Redwood Valley, she lives with her husband, Brian, in a world filled with art with sculptures, ceramics and mosaics created by the two of them. She will present her humorous ceramics of dogs, rams and demons.

Gail Rushmore of Ukiah will exhibit her portraits of women as well as ceramics and sculpture. Gail tells us, “In my best artistic moments, I’m not tied to the media and my joy is in the creative process, exploring different ways of telling a story. Being multi-faceted, a true Gemini, I’m semi-scattered but able to focus. I love the spontaneity of paper and paint, the thought-provoking and planning process involved in assembling mixed media, and the challenges of working with clay.

The Willits Center for the Arts is located at 71 E. Commercial St., (next to the Noyo Theater).

Mendocino Art Center Continues Online Classes in June

Although the MAC campus is currently closed due to COVID-19, it remains open online for classes, workshops and the gallery store. Please visit the Mendocino Art Center online at mendocinoartcenter.org for more information. For more information, visit mendocinoartcenter.org.

Partner Gallery Reopening in the heart of Mendocino

Partner artists will reopen their gallery in the historic Mendocino Beacon Building at 45062 Ukiah St., in the heart of Mendocino. After 10 years at the Glendeven Inn in Little River, another 10 years on Franklin Street in Fort Bragg, and one year only online during COVID, the artists at the gallery are happy to start a new era in Mendocino. They are working on preparing the space and can’t wait to open in June. Meanwhile, they are continuing their “Connected” exhibition online until June at: www.partnersgallery.com/online-exhibits

Save the dates!

The Mendocino Music Festival recently announced that its 2021 festival will run from Friday July 16 through Sunday July 25. For more information on tickets and schedule, please visit mendomusic.org.

Grace Hudson Museum “Postcards from Mecca” exhibition

The fascinating exhibition of the Grace Hudson Museum “Postcards from Mecca” runs until Sunday 22 August. The exhibition explores the friendship of two women who explored and experienced adventures in the Southern California desert from the late 1910s to the early 1930s. This traveling exhibit of Exhibit Envoy is complemented by a sample of images by AO Carpenter from the collections of the Grace Hudson Museum. A talented professional photographer, AO toured Mendocino County from the mid to late 1800s, documenting the landscapes, industries and people of the area. Welcome to the physical and in-person exhibitions at Grace Hudson. They are now open Wednesday to Friday, 11 am to 4 pm; Saturday and Sunday, from noon to 4 p.m. Closed on monday and tuesday. The museum is located at 431 S. Main St., Ukiah. For more information, call 707-467-2836 or visit gracehudsonmuseum.org.

2nd annual Art Under Twenty exhibition: Virtual show

The Visual Arts Department at Willits High School is pleased to present the 22nd Annual Art Under Twenty Exhibition. Their virtual exhibit features talented young artists from Willits and Laytonville and runs until August 31. Their works testify to the resilience of youth and their ability to meet the challenges and limitations of distance learning during the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information, visit willitscenterforhearts.org.

Chant du vin 2021! Save the dates!

Winesong 2021 Live and Virtual will be held on Friday and Saturday September 10-11, 2021. It will be a series of safe events, both in-person and virtual. For more information and to RSVP to let them know you are planning to be a part of the celebration, visit wineong.org.

“The art of the wind and the sea”

The Mendocino County Museum features “The Art of the Wind and the Sea” – a virtual community art exhibit. The Mendocino County Museum is currently open during normal hours and many of its regular services have resumed. Hours, services and capacity are subject to change to conform to changing health and safety guidelines. They are located at 400 E. Commercial St., Willits. For more information call 707-459-3726 or visit this link.

Linda Pack’s “For the Love of Reading”

A new edition of “For the Love of Reading” airs monthly on Mendocino County Public Radio, KZYX & Z (times and dates may vary.) If you missed hearing any or all of the most recent shows, or if you want to share the program with others, you can find the links to all podcasts and audio files of the program on lindapack.net. For more information about the program, visit kzyx.org/programs/love-reading.

MTC One Minute Radio Theater

Take a minute to enjoy the Mendocino Theater Company’s One-Minute Radio Theater, every Tuesday and Thursday at 8 p.m. on the local public radio station KZYX. For more information, visit mendocinotheatre.org.

Up close and classic

Up Close and Classical is a podcast series that takes a close look at the lives of classical composers and musicians. Each episode focuses on a composer, theme, or collection of works that have recently been presented in concert by the Symphony of the Redwoods and the Ukiah Symphony Orchestra. Through musical snippets, historical context, and insightful conversations with musicians, Up Close and Classical invites you to lean in and listen intently to the music you love. From Bizet to Ravel, Dr Philip Lenberg’s podcast focuses on some of the most influential French composers of the late 19th century. For more information, visit symphonyoftheredwoods.org.

Sequoia room video archive

Presented by North Coast Brewing Co., The Sequoia Room Video Archive includes over 60 hours of musical performances from sold-out shows at The Sequoia Room. You will find many different genres including; Jazz, Blues, Bluegrass and more on The Sequoia Room Facebook page.

Updates from the California Arts Council

The latest updates from the California Arts Council, as well as important links and resources for California artists, cultural workers and creatives on the coronavirus pandemic can be found by visiting their website at cac.ca. gov /.

Send arts and entertainment listings by noon on Friday to events@advocate-news.com. Openings are listed the week of the first Friday at Fort Bragg and the second Saturday in Mendocino. Please contact us for information on how to publicize paid courses and workshops.



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Franklin County Homeschool Students Participate in Mock Trial | Education https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/franklin-county-homeschool-students-participate-in-mock-trial-education/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/franklin-county-homeschool-students-participate-in-mock-trial-education/#respond Fri, 04 Jun 2021 04:15:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/04/franklin-county-homeschool-students-participate-in-mock-trial-education/ Home-schooled Classical Conversations Challenge B students from Franklin County and Martinsville recently spent several hours in a mock trial at Roanoke Circuit Court. From left to right: Carter Alexander, Abigail Morris and Paul Hicks. Second row: Blaize Brubaker, Tristen Beyer and Jalen Wisler. Third row: Gabe Lawrence, Taylor Lieteau and Abby Phillips. Franklin News-Post Special […]]]>







Home-schooled Classical Conversations Challenge B students from Franklin County and Martinsville recently spent several hours in a mock trial at Roanoke Circuit Court. From left to right: Carter Alexander, Abigail Morris and Paul Hicks. Second row: Blaize Brubaker, Tristen Beyer and Jalen Wisler. Third row: Gabe Lawrence, Taylor Lieteau and Abby Phillips.


Franklin News-Post Special

Classical Conversations Challenge B classes from Christiansburg, Roanoke, Franklin County and Martinsville held a mock trial at Roanoke Circuit Court on May 13.

The mock trial is a one-semester project for students aged 13 to 16. They participate in repeated courtroom trials to learn about the legal system competitively. Classical Conversations, the world’s largest classical home education organization, uses mock trial competitions to teach skills in research, grammar, writing, rhetoric, public speaking, debate, and drama.

By addressing the dilemmas inevitably encountered when working in an imperfect system, we help students see that there is only one truly perfect system, a perfectly righteous judge, and a perfect deliverer of righteousness: God. the father. This awareness helps to fulfill the mission of Classic Conversations: Know God and make Him known.

This year’s mock trial was a third degree murder case involving Tatum Zillias, a construction owner, advancing construction with an elevator above the crane’s maximum engineering load in the remnants of wind and rain. of a hurricane. This lift resulted in the crash of the crane and two deaths. The question in court was whether Zillias’ efforts manifested extreme indifference to the value of human life. The prosecution had Emerson Turnkin, site supervisor and London Packard, the self-proclaimed leader of the Franklin’s Trench Squatters as witnesses, while the defense team called Tatum Zillias himself, Micah Estratton, the crane operator and Fightin ‘expert witness. Phil, and Reese Dentner, investigative reporter.



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Amazon appoints five graduate researchers in new SCS – Machine Learning – CMU collaboration https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/02/amazon-appoints-five-graduate-researchers-in-new-scs-machine-learning-cmu-collaboration/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/02/amazon-appoints-five-graduate-researchers-in-new-scs-machine-learning-cmu-collaboration/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 21:23:58 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/02/amazon-appoints-five-graduate-researchers-in-new-scs-machine-learning-cmu-collaboration/ Five Carnegie Mellon University students with ties to the School of Computer Science were selected for the inaugural Amazon Graduate Research Fellows program. Amazon and CMU established the program to strengthen the company’s commitment to supporting promising researchers in academia. Over the past few years, the company has collaborated with several leading universities to help […]]]>


Five Carnegie Mellon University students with ties to the School of Computer Science were selected for the inaugural Amazon Graduate Research Fellows program.

Amazon and CMU established the program to strengthen the company’s commitment to supporting promising researchers in academia. Over the past few years, the company has collaborated with several leading universities to help amplify the work being done by the masters and doctorates. students.

The five scholarship recipients are Nil-Jana Akpinar, Natalia Lombardi from Oliveria, Divyansh Kaushik, Emre Yolcu and Minji Yoon.

The program supports graduate students engaged in scientific research in automated reasoning, computer vision, robotics, language technology, machine learning, operations research, and data science. Fellows will also be invited to take an interview for a science internship at Amazon.

“Each scholar has been selected based on their academic excellence and their potential to achieve great things in the areas of their choice,” said Alexa Smola, vice president of Amazon Web Services and distinguished scientist. “We’ve looked at their research proposals to make sure they’re doing a really good job. They’re the real stars here. We provide the funds, but they do the actual research.”

Yoon and Yolcu are pursuing doctoral studies in the Computer Science department. Yoon works on the automation and democratization of graph exploration. Yolcu has contributed to the complexity of proof systems that reason on symmetries, with publications appearing in SAT and NeurIPS.

Kaushik is a doctoral candidate for the Institute of Language Technologies. He is working on the development of natural language processing (NLP) systems capable of operating reliably under real deployment settings.

Akpinar and by Oliveria are pursuing doctoral studies as part of a joint program in the Machine learning department and the Department of Statistics and Data Science. Akpinar’s work focuses on auditing for bias in algorithmic systems and shows how differential crime reporting rates by victims can lead to biased results from predictive policing algorithms. De Oliveria studies the estimation of generalizations, known as optimism in classical statistical terms. His work examines the difference between the test and training performance of a predictive algorithm.

Learn more about the Amazon Graduate Research Fellows program and the recipients of this blog post on the Amazon Science site.



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Encore Chamber Music stirs up love of learning with 2021 ‘Fire’ Music and Ideas Festival https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/02/encore-chamber-music-stirs-up-love-of-learning-with-2021-fire-music-and-ideas-festival/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/02/encore-chamber-music-stirs-up-love-of-learning-with-2021-fire-music-and-ideas-festival/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 09:52:05 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/02/encore-chamber-music-stirs-up-love-of-learning-with-2021-fire-music-and-ideas-festival/ GATES MILLS, Ohio – Bluegrass. Jazz. A wide range of speakers and even fitness. It’s not the Encore Chamber Music Festival that most people know about. For insiders, however, it’s not that unusual. The main difference with the 2021 festival is its openness. What once went on behind the scenes at Encore’s training institute is […]]]>


GATES MILLS, Ohio – Bluegrass. Jazz. A wide range of speakers and even fitness. It’s not the Encore Chamber Music Festival that most people know about.

For insiders, however, it’s not that unusual. The main difference with the 2021 festival is its openness. What once went on behind the scenes at Encore’s training institute is now being offered on stage to all who attend.

“We’re still doing all the original things we’ve always done,” said violinist Jinjoo Cho, founding director of the festival. “Now we’re just making it available to the public. “

One thing is certain about the sixth annual edition: it is not the party of yesteryear. After a year lost to the pandemic, Cho returned to Gilmour Academy not only with renewed vigor to teach aspiring chamber musicians, but also with a new intellectual focus and a broader palette for her audience. She calls it a cross between TED Talks and a traditional music festival.

Now in the mix with classical concerts are bluegrass and jazz events, and each concert is preceded by a panel discussion. The appropriate season title is “Fire”, as in stoking.

“This is exactly what we want to do in people’s hearts: to jumpstart something,” Cho said. “It is a gathering space for all those who want to learn, through the prism of music. I want to challenge people and open up new horizons and bring people together around common sense.

Common sense is not the only unifying force. The 2021 festival also brings people together around… people. Behind every program is a notable figure, someone who Cho says inspires him in one way or another.

Lacking human interaction during the pandemic, Cho said she returned to the books and albums of her youth and reconnected with people like Marie Curie, Billie Holiday, Haruki Murakami, Rosa Parks and Teddy Roosevelt. Each was then the subject of a concert and a round table. Five sessions simply consist of a free yoga class, taught by a local instructor.

“Everything she programs is a fantastic piece of music, and she touches on so many aspects of music,” said Sibbi Bernhardsson, Encore violin faculty member, who will perform at several concerts. “It’s a very fresh and exciting program. I find it to be a kind of perfect balance.

Two concerts stand out for Cho in 2021: those on Albert Einstein and climate activist Greta Thunberg. Einstein, a violinist, is “literally the reason I play the violin,” Cho said, while Thunberg is “very suited to our roots and who I am as a person”.

She also called attention to the two unclassical events, an Independence Day concert featuring bluegrass stars Michael Cleveland and Flamekeeper, and an evening of jazz with singer Evelyn Wright and a trio consisting of Dave Thomas, Bill Ransom and Dominick Farinacci.

These, meanwhile, sit alongside concerts by the Cavani String Quartet, the Ariel Quartet and a list of others including guitarist Jiji, cellist Clive Greensmith and Cho herself.

“I just don’t see the point of distinguishing [between genres] more, ”Cho said. “In a way, it just felt very natural to plan the season this way. It feels more organic. You have to do something that challenges you if you want to grow taller.

Another thing that will definitely look more natural in 2021 is having a live audience. After a year of playing online, Bernhardsson said he looks forward to playing for others in person.

“You can’t just theorize in the practice room,” he said. “You have to go out and show what you’ve been practicing. “

Cho took that feeling a step further. Without live listeners, she is “out of breath,” she said.

She can’t wait to see how her “Fire” season plays out, sure, but the truth is, she would have been happy with just about any role model bringing her students and Encore colleagues back onto the stage, where they belong.

“To do anything we are so desperate,” she said. “We can’t wait to feel the magic again. “

PREVIEW

Encore Chamber Music Institute Music and Ideas Festival

When: From Wednesday June 9 to Saturday July 17

Or: Dodero Center for Performing Arts, Gilmour Academy, 2045 SOM Center Road, Gates Mills

Tickets: $ 5- $ 220, encorechambermusic.org.

ENCORE CHAMBER MUSIC 2021 FESTIVAL OF MUSIC AND IDEAS

Wednesday June 9

7:00 p.m.

YouTube Live with Edward Klorman: music from Mozart’s friends, social interaction in chamber works

Friday 11 June

6:00 p.m.

Marie Curie: Scientific discoveries for the public good

Friday 11 June

7:00 p.m.

Triggered by Marie: The Ariel Quartet

saturday 12 june

10:00 a.m.

Yoga at Encore (Free)

Sunday 13 June

3:30 p.m.

Haruki Murakami: omens, symbols and music

Sunday 13 June

4:30 p.m.

Triggered by Murakami: violist Mathieu Herzog and violinist Gabriel Le Magadure

Friday June 18

6:00 p.m.

Billie Holiday: Tragedy and Triumph

Friday June 18

7:00 p.m.

Triggered by Billie: Evelyn Wright Jazz Quartet

saturday 19 june

10:00 a.m.

Yoga at Encore (Free)

Sunday 20 June

3:30 p.m.

Rosa Parks: The Power of Introverted Minds

Sunday 20 June

4:30 p.m.

Triggered by Rosa: The Cavani Quartet

Thursday June 24

6:00 p.m.

YouTube Live with the Cavani Quartet: Songs without words

Thursday June 24

7:00 p.m.

Blooming Artist Concert n ° 1: Songs without words

friday 25 june

4 p.m. and 7 p.m.

Blooming Artist Concerts n ° 2 and 3: Songs without words

saturday june 26

10:00 a.m.

Yoga at Encore (Free)

Friday July 2

6:00 p.m.

Albert Einstein: “Peak Performance: The Power of the Meditative Mind”

Friday July 2

7:00 p.m.

Triggered by Albert: “Bach, Mozart and various trains, with Jinjoo Cho and Clive Greensmith”

saturday july 3

10:00 a.m.

Yoga at Encore (Free)

sunday 4 july

3:30 p.m.

Theodore Roosevelt: “Keeping the Forest Green: Conserving United States National Parks”

sunday 4 july

4:30 p.m.

Triggered by Teddy: “July 4th with Michael Cleveland and Flamekeeper”

Friday July 9

6:00 p.m.

Frida Kahlo and Beethoven: “Disability in the arts”

Friday July 9

7:00 p.m.

Triggered by Frida: Guitarist Jiji and Encore Friends

saturday july 10

10:00 a.m.

Yoga at Encore (Free)

Sunday July 11

3:30 p.m.

Greta Thunberg: “The ruined land of Generation Z”

Sunday July 11

4:30 p.m.

Triggered by Greta: “Earth Music with Encore Artists”

Saturday July 17th

1:00 p.m.

YouTube Live: Artists in Bloom Marathon



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The Dallas Symphony Orchestra brings the sound of music back to the Metroplex https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/the-dallas-symphony-orchestra-brings-the-sound-of-music-back-to-the-metroplex/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/the-dallas-symphony-orchestra-brings-the-sound-of-music-back-to-the-metroplex/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 16:47:14 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/06/01/the-dallas-symphony-orchestra-brings-the-sound-of-music-back-to-the-metroplex/ As of last September, the Dallas Symphony has been one of the only orchestras in the country to resume performing weekly for the public. Connected through a combination of virtual and live performances, the organization has been a pioneer in how to create and share music during the pandemic – not just for its season […]]]>


As of last September, the Dallas Symphony has been one of the only orchestras in the country to resume performing weekly for the public. Connected through a combination of virtual and live performances, the organization has been a pioneer in how to create and share music during the pandemic – not just for its season subscribers, but for all who love and enjoy connecting through music.

The chamber music concerts in the aisles and parking lots were just the beginning. Today, as more people begin to feel comfortable reappearing in once limited activities – health and safety still being a top priority – the DSO hopes to welcome more audiences across the metroplex. with a number of entertainment opportunities coming this spring and summer.

Calvin Alexander, winner of the 2021 Lynn Harrell concerto competition(Sylvia Elzafon)

At Meyerson and other places

Audiences can attend performances at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, ranging from Mozart to the sounds of spirituals. Families can enjoy the Magic Circle Mime Company theater on June 5 with the Mozart Experience. On June 11, guest conductor Michelle Merrill will lead the DSO at the annual Teen Concert, hosted by the DSO Teen Council. DSO Lynn Harrell Concerto 2021 winner Calvin Alexander will make his DSO debut with Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto. From June 18-20, audiences can join the DSO at the June 17 Celebration of Freedom and Diversity with soloists Kearstin Piper Brown, soprano, and Kevin Deas, bass baritone. The Vertigo Troupe will present haunting performances featuring acrobats in an eclectic and innovative mix of circus, dance and theater at the Meyerson from June 25-26.

The DSO will maintain strict health protocols at each site. Masks are required for all concert attendees, as well as DSO staff and musicians, as well as timed entry and exit and party seats six feet apart.

The new season will begin in September 2021 with a line-up of music from the Texas Instruments Classical Series; the Pops series, presented by Capital One; Family concerts and holiday shows.

Outdoors with DSO Symphony in the City

Performing in parks around Dallas has been a decades-long tradition for DSO. After missing out last year, DSO Symphony in the City is making a big comeback to outdoor stages, with programs supported by the City of Dallas Office of Arts and Culture.

The DSO will launch a summer of shows at Flag Pole Hill on May 31 at 8:15 p.m., which will include fireworks for all to enjoy. The performance rain site will take place at the Meyerson.

On June 3, the DSO will visit Kidd Springs Park in Oak Cliff at 8:15 p.m., sponsored by the Methodist Dallas Medical Center and GFT Charity.

Finally, the DSO will perform at Paul Quinn College on June 15 at 8:15 p.m., with a rain site at the college’s Tiger’s Den Gymnasium.

Students learn instruments as part of the DSO Young Musicians program.
Students learn the instruments as part of the DSO Young Musicians program.(Sylvia Elzafon)

For kids

Showing its commitment to music education and special programming for all, DSO is offering Dallas youth a chance to strike a chord through Young Musicians Summer Camp. Beginning in mid-July, the camps offer free instruments and lessons to students in Grades 1-5, with distance and in-person learning for current students, and an in-person camp for new students. All students will have the instrument of their choice to participate in ensembles, a drum circle and a choir, with a progressive program that includes social and emotional learning.

As with the DSO’s indoor performances, safety protocols will be in place at the Young Musicians Summer Camp, including masking, social distancing and hand sanitation.

The DSO Young Strings program offers summer camps for all Dallas students in grades 5 and up who play violin, viola, cello, and double bass. These intensive week-long workshops led by musicians from DSO and other professionals are designed to help students improve their technique and musicianship while working in chamber ensembles. The first week of the camp July 26-30 is for beginner / intermediate students in Suzuki books 2-4, and week two August 2-6 is for students more advanced in Suzuki book 5 or above. Both camps are held at the Meyerson and cost $ 200 to attend.

For more information and to register, visit https://dallassymphony.org/community-education/.

Music for the whole community

With roots dating back to the early 20th century, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra has always been committed to bringing the joy of music to everyone, and that dedication remains unchanged. With a combination of classic programming, innovative pop concerts, and community outreach and education programs, audiences new and old have a lot to look forward to this summer.

To learn more about upcoming DSO performances, visit https://dallassymphony.org/concerts-and-events/calendar/.



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$ 18 concert tickets cost $ 1,000 for unvaccinated fans https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/31/18-concert-tickets-cost-1000-for-unvaccinated-fans/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/31/18-concert-tickets-cost-1000-for-unvaccinated-fans/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 16:46:21 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/31/18-concert-tickets-cost-1000-for-unvaccinated-fans/ A concert organizer in Florida charges unvaccinated punk fans $ 1,000 to attend a show with a regular price of $ 18. The “no-vax tax” means that those who haven’t received coronavirus vaccines would have to pay 50 times the going rate to see the concert. Paul Williams is hosting the event, titled by Teenage […]]]>


A concert organizer in Florida charges unvaccinated punk fans $ 1,000 to attend a show with a regular price of $ 18.

The “no-vax tax” means that those who haven’t received coronavirus vaccines would have to pay 50 times the going rate to see the concert.

Paul Williams is hosting the event, titled by Teenage Bottlerocket, in St. Petersburg on June 26. receive a vaccine, or who have decided not to accept one.

“We’re just trying to make a show safe,” Williams told ABC Action News, adding that people “should go out and get vaccinated to protect themselves, their families and their communities.” He continued, “I also wanted it to be a vaccine drive to get the guards out of the fence. I wanted the kids who wanted to go to shows to come out and take their pictures.

He said he sold around 250 standard-priced tickets, while none of the four premium passes were purchased. If any of them sold, he vowed that the buyer would not be “sidelined” at the show and “treated like everyone else”. He reported that the response to his move had been “overwhelmingly positive”, although he was also receiving annoying messages from anti-vaxxers. “Caring about people’s safety is very bad, apparently,” he noted.

One fan argued the pricing plan was unfair, claiming she had yet to receive a vaccine without her fault. Teenage Bottlerocket frontman Ray Carlisle said she was free to attend other shows where status checks weren’t in place. “We are all vaccinated,” he said. “We encourage everyone to get vaccinated so we can see you in the pit.”



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Learn to play the piano with a lifetime subscription to a premium app https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/learn-to-play-the-piano-with-a-lifetime-subscription-to-a-premium-app/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/learn-to-play-the-piano-with-a-lifetime-subscription-to-a-premium-app/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 13:31:51 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/learn-to-play-the-piano-with-a-lifetime-subscription-to-a-premium-app/ What is the # 1 instrument in most American music schools? The answer may not surprise you: it is a classic, attractive and very versatile instrument that can produce a variety of sounds. As of 2019, “The piano / keyboard is the most requested instrument to be played by young musicians at least in the […]]]>


What is the # 1 instrument in most American music schools? The answer may not surprise you: it is a classic, attractive and very versatile instrument that can produce a variety of sounds. As of 2019, “The piano / keyboard is the most requested instrument to be played by young musicians at least in the United States,” according to the Los Angeles Music Teachers website.

If you missed your chance to learn piano in school, don’t worry. There is a new way to learn to play and it makes the instrument more accessible than ever. Typically sold for $ 299, and usually offered by us at a 50% discount to $ 149.99, our Skoove Premium Piano Lessons Lifetime Membership will drop to just $ 113 for a limited time this Memorial Day weekend.

Learn the piano with an app

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COLUMN: ON BROKEN CRUTCHES – Journal https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/column-on-broken-crutches-journal/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/column-on-broken-crutches-journal/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 02:05:56 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/30/column-on-broken-crutches-journal/ Classical textual sources relate an intriguing anecdote into the generally adventurous life of the philosophical giant Ibn Sina – the Avicenna of the Latin West and the majestic ‘Great Shaykh’ (al Shaykh al Raees) of Islamic intellectual history. In 1023, after serving as vizier of the Shiite ruler Buyid Shams al Dawla, and having mysteriously […]]]>


Classical textual sources relate an intriguing anecdote into the generally adventurous life of the philosophical giant Ibn Sina – the Avicenna of the Latin West and the majestic ‘Great Shaykh’ (al Shaykh al Raees) of Islamic intellectual history.

In 1023, after serving as vizier of the Shiite ruler Buyid Shams al Dawla, and having mysteriously gone underground for several years while engaged in “ shady ” clandestine activities, he was imprisoned in the suburb of Hamadan. . .

His boss’s Turkish army had accused him of the capital crime of “anti-state” activities. It was a political scandal that involved dynastic / partisan machinations, as it is reported that bad blood had been generated between our sage and this army.

It all feels like a series of dramatic episodes in the life of a fast-paced, scheming state actor, rather than isolated accidents traversing the serene loneliness of a prolific world philosopher. But it turns out that this is precisely the case here, since philosophers, poets and men of letters in general generally served as state officials in the Persian Muslim empires.

In Bukhara, where Ibn Sina began his career, he ruled locally as district governor. Later, in 1015, he was placed in a high post in Hamadan, under the patronage of Shams al Dawla. Upon Shams’ death some six years later and the accession of a new emir, Ibn Sina relinquished his high state office and, after disappearing from the public eye for about eight years, remaining under the protection of a private patron, he is now incarcerated.

But then, barely four months later, philosopher Kakuyid’s future boss fires Hamadan’s leader Buyid, and the philosopher is now free and free. But one day, maybe just after a year, Ibn Sina fled to Isfahan. Here, the story becomes even more fascinating: he escapes with four accomplices in the middle of the night – all disguised as Sufis.

Imprisonments, legal dramas, military adventures, high office, shifting loyalties and patronages, flight – all of these are, typically, historical elements in the lives of intellectuals, thinkers and poets of the Persian world. How do we explain this?

An answer to this question brings us to the heart of this rather long biographical excursion. We have already noted that men of knowledge and art served as state officials in the Turkish and Persian dynasties in the medieval Muslim world. This means that they were not mere passive subjects on whom dynastic maneuvers operated; in fact, they were actors themselves – and this is a unique feature of the dynastic history of the Islamic world. But there is yet another unique feature of Muslim dynastic culture.

We therefore note another royal Muslim peculiarity. Scientists and philosophers were commodities to victorious rulers; some of their loot to be acquired, as well as gems, gold and silver, and works of art. Just as the defeated rulers had to abandon their palaces, they were also forced to surrender their intellectuals and poets.

When, as a result of his advance on the bank of the Oxus River, Mahmud Ghaznavi sent an ultimatum to the defeated ruler of Khwarazmshah, the conqueror’s claims were typical:

“I heard that there were at the court of Khwarazmshah several men of knowledge, each without equal in his knowledge, such as [so and so, and so and so]. You must send them to our court, so that they may have the honor of being presented there and that we may derive prestige from their knowledge and abilities … “

Note that it was not only material wealth and valiant armies that brought prestige and power to the royal court. This glory also came from the entourage of poets, writers and thinkers that the ruler had managed to gather around him, and the libraries he had acquired, including rare manuscripts and works of art. Often, learned figures were taken away by the victor against his own will; they were kidnapped, looted, literally.

Ghaznavi, who ruled over a vast region from 998 to 1030, brought to his capital Ghazna entire libraries from many centers of cultural refinement, including Rayy and Isfahan. In his courtyard, there were as many as 400 poets, like a silvery cluster of moons around a winning glittering poet, in this case, the incomparable Unsuri.

The case of al Biruni here is both dramatic and instructive. In the year 998, he entered the service of the Ziyarid emir in Gorgan, Shams al Maali Qabus – it was under the patronage of Qabus that al Biruni wrote his first great famous work on historical and scientific chronology, Al Asar. Al Baqiya [Chronology of Ancient Nations].

Given Ghaznavi’s terrifying ultimatum for the handing over of human intellectual goods, al Biruni left Gorgan and moved on, possibly being one of those intellectuals who refused to give in to the ultimatum. Now the stories go that he was captured by Mahmud Ghaznavi’s army – if so, then this monumental sage has been delivered to the Sultan in chains.

But back to our Shaykh. It seems quite clear that Ibn Sina’s frequent moves and his sneaky escape from Hamadan were all desperate attempts to avoid kidnapping raids on Ghaznavi’s soldiers.

We are talking about extremely turbulent times in the post-classical history of the Muslim dynasties, so turbulent that one who is an undisputed ruler could one day end up a chained prisoner – with the exception of the Ghaznavids, most of the dynasties of the time. were of very short duration. A historical result of all this is the emergence of a new genre of poetry called habsiyyat or prison poetry. Our own Faiz Ahmed Faiz wrote a whole Zindan-nama (The Prison Book).

Once they lost their throne, the sacked rulers entered another realm over which they ruled: the realm of poetry. Poetry therefore served as crutches on which even rulers of old could rest their broken legs and injured egos.

Nowadays, when we do not cultivate poetic sensibilities in our young people, by training them only for professional trades, they do not have crutches on which to fall back in times of distress and worldly failures. In fact, we have robbed them of their dreams, we have taken them away from the world of the imagination, we have broken their crutches.

The columnist is dean of the School of Liberal Arts at Lahore University of Management and Technology and a visiting scholar at the University of California, Berkeley.

Posted in Dawn, Books & Authors, May 30, 2021



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Srishti Mitra wants to make a difference in women’s health | Community https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/29/srishti-mitra-wants-to-make-a-difference-in-womens-health-community/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/29/srishti-mitra-wants-to-make-a-difference-in-womens-health-community/#respond Sat, 29 May 2021 01:30:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/29/srishti-mitra-wants-to-make-a-difference-in-womens-health-community/ As a musician, Srishti Mitra sang the national anthem at local ROTC events and at her high school graduation ceremony, and also performed Indian classical music at cultural events in Tucson and in Phoenix. As a writer, she won an award for an essay on Queen Laxmibai, a leader of the Indian rebellion against British […]]]>


As a musician, Srishti Mitra sang the national anthem at local ROTC events and at her high school graduation ceremony, and also performed Indian classical music at cultural events in Tucson and in Phoenix. As a writer, she won an award for an essay on Queen Laxmibai, a leader of the Indian rebellion against British rule, and won a VFW competition with an essay on the importance of voting. As a student, she heads the 2021 class of Nogales High School and is heading towards a career in medicine.

This year’s NHS Valedictorian plans to study biomedical engineering at university and go to medical school, and hopes to someday work with the United Nations. But she said that doesn’t mean forgetting the city where she grew up since she was 6.

“I also want to carry the name Nogales, because this community has given me so much and I want to give back to it,” Mitra said.

From an early age, Mitra intended to become a professional scientist. In elementary school, she thought of a career in marine biology and later in volcanology. By the time she was in college, she had settled on medicine.

This interest is in part due to the research she has carried out for several years. Mitra’s father is the former CEO of Lifespring Hospitals, an Indian hospital chain that provides maternity care to low-income women. During regular visits to India and other South Asian countries, Mitra learned about the company, spoke with doctors, nurses and hospital staff, and ultimately wrote a research paper on what could look like low cost maternity care in the future.

“When I saw the atmosphere of the hospital and everything, it made me want to go into medicine,” she said. She is particularly interested in gynecology and cardiology.

Mitra was born in Kalyani, West Bengal, but her family has its roots in Kolkata, the state capital a few miles away. At the age of 6, Mitra and her mother Dipanjana Mitra moved to Nogales, when her mother accepted a job as a math teacher at Nogales High School. Her father initially stayed in India, but then joined the family in Arizona when Mitra was in eighth grade.

In second grade, Mitra found herself in an unusual situation for a high school student – she was a student in a trigonometry class taught by her mother. “It was very awkward at first,” Mitra said with a laugh, “but I got used to it.

She credits several teachers for having particularly supported her in her academic career.

She said that Lupita Lillywhite, her fifth grade teacher, was “one of the most wonderful people I have met.” A college teacher, Alison Smith, helped her think about math in new and fun ways.

In high school, Mitra said she was inspired by history teacher Luke Brannen, as well as her mother. “She’s just a teacher in every way,” Mitra said.

During his freshman and sophomore years, Mitra participated in the Air Force Junior ROTC program at the NHS. Although she is not heading to the military, she said the JROTC taught her important lessons.

“I think being a part of this program taught me the importance of discipline and integrity, honesty and sincerity,” she said.

And she wanted to say hello to some of her ROTC instructors: Donald Belch, Ronald Thielke, and Frederick Harvey.






Srishti Mitra sings the national anthem at the start of the NHS Class of 2021 graduation ceremony on May 21.




Mitra said another inspiring figure for her and her family is Rabindranath Tagore, an Indian writer and artist who was a leading figure in Bengali culture in the 19th and 20th centuries, in addition to being the first Nobel Laureate. from the country and a women’s rights defender. In addition to singing Carnatic classical music, Mitra sings Rabindra Sangeet – songs composed by Tagore.

“He’s someone we really respect,” she said, adding that she saw him as a guru.

The switch to e-learning for her senior year in high school left Mitra feeling like something was missing, but she says the experience also helped her understand what she enjoys learning in school, alongside a teacher and classmates.

“It’s not the same,” she said of distance learning. “I think I missed that atmosphere the most.”

Mitra found out that she was the top-ranked student in her class earlier in senior year, when she received her mid-year transcript, which indicated her placement among her peers.

“I couldn’t believe he was saying ‘1’,” she recalls. “I’m like, ‘Is there a number missing in there? “”

“I felt very grateful and grateful, and a little proud too,” she said. “It was a very long journey.”

Earlier this month, she completed exams for her International Baccalaureate program. Next up is a summer program that conducts laboratory research at Arizona State University. Then she plans to go to college in the fall. Mitra has been admitted to both Harvard and ASU, but said Thursday she still had not made a final decision on which school she would attend next year.



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HFA Honors Two Faculty Members for Teaching Excellence with College Outstanding Teacher Award | News and Media Relations Office https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/28/hfa-honors-two-faculty-members-for-teaching-excellence-with-college-outstanding-teacher-award-news-and-media-relations-office/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/28/hfa-honors-two-faculty-members-for-teaching-excellence-with-college-outstanding-teacher-award-news-and-media-relations-office/#respond Fri, 28 May 2021 20:41:18 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/05/28/hfa-honors-two-faculty-members-for-teaching-excellence-with-college-outstanding-teacher-award-news-and-media-relations-office/ The College of Humanities and Fine Arts (HFA) has announced its 2021 College Outstanding Teaching Award winners, Milan Dragicevich and Pari Riahi. Dragicevich, Professor in the Department of Theater, and Riahi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Architecture, are recognized for their exceptional teaching, mentoring, program development efforts and impact on the lives of students. […]]]>


The College of Humanities and Fine Arts (HFA) has announced its 2021 College Outstanding Teaching Award winners, Milan Dragicevich and Pari Riahi. Dragicevich, Professor in the Department of Theater, and Riahi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Architecture, are recognized for their exceptional teaching, mentoring, program development efforts and impact on the lives of students.

Milan Dragicevitch

Dragicevich, actor and director, has educated and inspired UMass Amherst students in many aspects of stage performance since 2004. His success comes from years of experience, from a researcher’s willingness to find out what works. and the dedication of an educator to sharing knowledge and encouraging students. development. Colleagues note that students appreciate the defined techniques and the clear path his courses provide to success. These methods are more widely available in his textbook, “The Persuasive Actor: Rhetorical Power on the Contemporary Stage”. Drawing inspiration and substance from classic and contemporary materials, Dragicevich observes: “When students are rooted in the fundamental tools of performance, they acquire wings to fly over any type of theatrical terrain.” Student feedback reflects this principle and highlights the impact it has on their lives and the role it plays in advancing their career aspirations. A graduate and currently master’s candidate of the theater department expressed gratitude for the way “[Professor Dragicevich] helped me amplify my voice and see the importance of my voice and my words. Another student notes how he “nurtures his students with such a deep passion and motivation not only for acting, but also for the love of the art and the love of seeing his students grow and succeed.”

Riahi bet

Riahi’s educational inspiration began with one of her own college mentors who, she says, expressed “genuine empathy for every student.” Using this approach in her architectural design studio and theory classes, she has garnered praise from many students who cite her “enthusiasm for the subject”, “her insight into architecture and the work we do”, ” his passion and wealth of knowledge ”, and the ability“ to meet every student wherever they are ”. As a practicing architect, Riahi purposefully enhances “the learning entered by students by keeping the topic relevant and grounded” and by engaging students in authentic projects and tasks. This is facilitated by its practice of “differentiated instruction,” where progress is based on the student’s position along the design continuum rather than a set point. Riahi says she is sustained and propelled forward by “the brilliance and hope of her own students, by their persistence and courage.” A student’s comment poignantly captures the impact of her teaching: “Pari’s mentorship opened doors to unknown and exciting possibilities for me, which both contradict and complement my preconceptions about architecture and where. my career can take me.

In recognition of their commitment to the art of teaching, their passion for their subjects, and their genuine concern and interest in student success, the 2021 HFA College Outstanding Teaching Awards are presented to Professors Dragicevich and Riahi.



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