Classical Learning – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 07:14:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Classical Learning – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 Quantum Benchmarking: My Qubits Are Better Than Yours https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/14/quantum-benchmarking-my-qubits-are-better-than-yours/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 07:14:30 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/14/quantum-benchmarking-my-qubits-are-better-than-yours/ When it comes to computers, technologies for bits are not created equal. It shows in a quick stroll through your local electronics store. Photographers can take an SD card, while gamers can take discs for their home console. Meanwhile, down the next aisle, a back-to-school shopper will pick up the latest Macbook with “SSD.” Ultimately, […]]]>

When it comes to computers, technologies for bits are not created equal.

It shows in a quick stroll through your local electronics store. Photographers can take an SD card, while gamers can take discs for their home console. Meanwhile, down the next aisle, a back-to-school shopper will pick up the latest Macbook with “SSD.” Ultimately, every photo, video game, or final report comes down to a list of 0s and 1s. depends entirely on the specifics of the application.

Finding the right qubit for the right job

Today, we are still in the early stages of quantum computing, so it is hard to believe that we will ever have to make these kinds of choices: what type of qubit (quantum bit) is suitable for what job? But over the next decade – as quantum computers hit the market – we expect to see a similar breakthrough. Key to all of this will be the ability to objectively compare performance against claims made.

Just as there are many ways to store a traditional bit, there are many types of qubits. today’s advanced technologies include qubits built from atoms, ions, photons, superconductors and ions. Each of these technologies scores differently on key metrics such as speed, scalability, reliability, interoperability, robustness, and cost. Importantly, no one type of qubit wins in all categories. In fact, many of these measures are in opposition, for example, the fastest qubits also tend to be the least scalable.

Borrowing from a rich benchmarking tradition

In the absence of a single dominant qubit type, we should instead assess the ability of each qubit type to support different use cases like machine learning, quantum dynamics, optimization, sensing or materials science. These benchmarks, which are finely tuned to real-world applications, will determine industry preferences and demand for specific quantum hardware models. Just as in traditional computing, we expect a diversity of qubit types to emerge, each of which will drive different software applications.

Designing an effective and useful suite of benchmarks is a daunting task, but fortunately we can borrow several benchmarking principles from classic computers over the past three decades.

As business leaders begin to craft their quantum strategies, performance benchmarking should be a key part of any long-term plan. Hardware vendors will be fighting for market share and there will be no shortage of options. Understanding everyone’s performance objectively will give business leaders the clarity they need to make the best possible choices. Plus, high-quality SKUs also allow executives to cut through the hype and let the data guide buying decisions.

A Stallion to the Holy Grail: Quantum Error Correction

While early applications of quantum computing are expected to unlock speedups for niche use cases, the broadest market applicability is tied to a key technology: quantum error correction (QEC). This technology, which allows qubits to behave perfectly, is the primary focus of many of the major quantum hardware vendors. The first qubit types to demonstrate QEC will be well positioned to capture latent industry demand for applications that require much more reliable quantum computers than what we have today.

With this in mind, quantum benchmarks should include quantum error correction itself as a benchmark for progress. In our own work, we have found that QEC “constrains” very different parts of a quantum computer than other applications. For example, a critical component of QEC is the software’s ability to adapt on the fly (or in technical terms, “feed-forward measurement”). This component is unique to QEC and currently an area where hardware vendors need to make continuous progress.

In this sense, setting appropriate benchmarks, informed by real industry demand, can accelerate progress towards tomorrow’s quantum computers. Just as benchmarks have both chronicled and influenced the design of traditional computers, benchmarks will play an important role in quantum computers by matching qubits to applications. Let’s work to make it as easy as a walk through the electronics store.


About the Author

Pranav Gokhale is Vice President of Quantum Software at ColdQuanta. ColdQuanta is a global quantum technology company solving the world’s toughest problems. ColdQuanta leverages quantum mechanics to build and integrate a range of quantum computers, sensors and networks. From fundamental physics to cutting-edge commercial products, ColdQuanta enables “quantum everywhere” through our ecosystem of devices and platforms.

Featured Image: ©Vchalup


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Sibling Duo Larkin Poe Create New Album Inspired By Blood Ties And Georgian Roots – WABE https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/11/sibling-duo-larkin-poe-create-new-album-inspired-by-blood-ties-and-georgian-roots-wabe/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 19:48:13 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/11/sibling-duo-larkin-poe-create-new-album-inspired-by-blood-ties-and-georgian-roots-wabe/ Rebecca and Megan Lovell are the multifaceted musicians of the duo Larkin Poe. Their style is soulful, gritty and rooted in Southern heritage. Originally from Atlanta and now based in Nashville, the Lovell sisters are descendants of literary genius Edgar Allen Poe. Larkin Poe’s new album “Blood Harmony” has just been released on Tricki-Woo Records, […]]]>

Rebecca and Megan Lovell are the multifaceted musicians of the duo Larkin Poe. Their style is soulful, gritty and rooted in Southern heritage. Originally from Atlanta and now based in Nashville, the Lovell sisters are descendants of literary genius Edgar Allen Poe. Larkin Poe’s new album “Blood Harmony” has just been released on Tricki-Woo Records, and the sisters joined “City Lights” host Lois Reitzes via Zoom to share more about it.

Interview Highlights:

Bringing classical discipline to a passion for Americana music:

“We started playing the classical violin when we were children. This was our first introduction to learning the language of music. So we took Suzuki lessons in violin and later piano, but we were introduced to roots music in our early teens, and that’s when our real passion for music began. And we were so inspired by the idea of ​​improvising and being able to write our own songs,” Megan said. “We gave up our classical lessons and started playing roots all the time. We grew up listening to a lot of classic rock and southern rock, so we wanted to work on that side of ourselves as well.

Reflections on a family deeply woven by music:

“I feel like our brotherhood is a two-way street,” Rebecca said. “The fact that we have so many shared experiences at this point in our lives – we’re both in our thirties now and we’ve been making music together for about 15 years – and obviously growing up together gives us a real innate understanding of each other. of others as individuals, both personally and musically… We’re able to have a lot of non-verbal communication when we play, we can look at each other and just catch a wave, which I think is really magical. She added: “But I think it took a lot of extra work on our family bond to make sure our relationship stays healthy.”

“Some of our earliest memories in music come from our mother. She drove us to our lessons, and she also sang harmonies with her siblings, and so she taught us how to sing harmonies. So we would be sitting at the piano and she would teach us to sing, and that’s really invaluable to us,” Megan recalled. “There’s a feeling that sibling harmonies run in the blood, and there’s no such thing as being able to sing with his family. So we wanted that to be well represented in the title track of the new album because singing together and playing together as siblings is really important. So ‘Blood Harmony’ seemed like a very good name for this album.

Singing on a bittersweet move in “Georgia Off My Mind:”

“We were born in Knoxville, but when we were toddlers our parents moved us to Georgia, and so naturally we identify as Georgia peaches,” Rebecca said. “About seven years ago…we made the decision to move back to Music City, Tennessee, and it was a very emotional decision to cross that line…It was a transitional season. That was, you know, one foot in the past, one foot in the future. And I think just being aware of that emotional transition really inspired me to write a song dedicated to the story of the leap of faith that we can all experience in different ways, and then naturally, just being able to scream Georgia and Coca-Cola and all the good things we identify with growing up in Georgia. It feels good. It feels good.

Larkin Poe’s new album ‘Blood Harmony’ is out now and available for purchase and streaming at https://www.larkinpoe.com/

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Kuke, a Chinese classical music platform, faces delisting from the NYSE https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/08/kuke-a-chinese-classical-music-platform-faces-delisting-from-the-nyse/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 18:56:33 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/08/kuke-a-chinese-classical-music-platform-faces-delisting-from-the-nyse/ China-based classical music streaming platform Kuke Music, which made its debut on the New York Stock Exchange in January 2021, faces delisting from the NYSE after its stock price traded below the required minimum for more than 30 days. Under US listing rules, stocks that trade below $1.00 for more than 30 days are considered […]]]>

China-based classical music streaming platform Kuke Music, which made its debut on the New York Stock Exchange in January 2021, faces delisting from the NYSE after its stock price traded below the required minimum for more than 30 days.

Under US listing rules, stocks that trade below $1.00 for more than 30 days are considered non-compliant. As of Nov. 2, Kuke’s 30-day average price for its US Depositary Shares was $0.55.

The company received a letter of the NYSE on September 29, requiring the company to return its stock price and average price above $1.00 within six months of said date.

In the event the company fails to meet the requirement, “the NYSE will initiate suspension and delisting proceedings,” according to a statement released last week (November 3).

In response, Kuke said he would “take all reasonable steps to regain compliance within the prescribed grace period” and that “the NYSE notification letter does not affect the company’s business operations.”

Since Monday (November 7), Kuke’s actions fell to an over-month low of $0.48. The company’s stock closed down 5.9% on Monday, extending its 3.8% drop on Friday (November 4).

Kuke launched its US listing in January 2021, raising $50 million after pricing its 5 million ADS IPO at $10 apiece.

He marked the company third attempt to raise funds overseas after its delisting from China’s National Stock and Listing Exchange in November 2017 and after two failed attempts to launch an IPO in Hong Kong, closer to home, in June 2018 and January 2019.

Its most recent closing price is now down 95% from the company’s IPO price.

Kuke’s lukewarm appetite for stocks comes amid a sale Chinese stocks at home and abroad due to concerns about the health of the Chinese economy and other geopolitical factors.

The Nasdaq Golden Dragon China Index, a gauge of the largest Chinese companies listed in the United States, fell 2.2% on Monday, ending a four-day winning streak. The rebound was sparked by signs that the US audit of Chinese companies listed on New York stock exchanges is making progress.

A landmark audit agreement between U.S. and Chinese regulators has relieved many companies that faced delisting from U.S. stock exchanges due to potential audit violations.

Meanwhile, Kuke is also among dozens of Chinese companies whose shares are at risk of being forced off US stock exchanges after the US Securities and Exchange Commission added them to a so-called “provided thatnotthe whole list » issuers with potential audit violations.

The company was added to this list in June. The list also includes Tencent Music Entertainment Group and NetEaseoperators of China’s largest music streaming services.


In addition to external factors, Kuke’s poor performance in capital markets may also be due to its lackluster finances.

In the second quarter for the year, the company’s revenue fell 35% year-on-year to 54.44 million yuan (US$7.53 million), weighed down by lower revenue. business from its subscription and licensing services and smart music learning solutions, which offset the 8% increase in live streaming revenue. musical events.

Kuke, however, managed to make a profit of 3.4 million yuan, compared to a net loss of 11.4 million yuan in the second quarter of 2021. The company’s institutional subscribers in China rose from 809 to 812.

“Going forward, given the challenges presented by the macroeconomic environment during the second quarter, we will continue to focus on strengthening our existing product and service portfolio and implementing cost reduction initiatives. costs to help us achieve a more optimized cost structure in the future,” Kuke CEO He Yu said in August.

The music industry around the world

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All College Symposium 2022 Connecticut College News https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/04/all-college-symposium-2022-connecticut-college-news/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 20:45:16 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/04/all-college-symposium-2022-connecticut-college-news/ President Katherine Bergeron, who attended more than 30 of the presentations, said she was moved by “all the clever ideas, thoughtful presentations, beautiful visuals, and the kindness and generosity of this incredible community.” Bergeron praised the Elders for persevering in the midst of a global pandemic to make important connections between all of their courses, […]]]>

President Katherine Bergeron, who attended more than 30 of the presentations, said she was moved by “all the clever ideas, thoughtful presentations, beautiful visuals, and the kindness and generosity of this incredible community.”

Bergeron praised the Elders for persevering in the midst of a global pandemic to make important connections between all of their courses, research, internships and experiences on campus and in communities around the world.

“The idea that everything is connected is something that I felt throughout the day. That’s why this college and this program is so special,” she said.

College Dean Erika Smith said it was “really amazing” to see how the seniors had benefited from their studies.

“In partnership with your mentor teachers, you have been encouraged and guided, both intellectually and interpersonally, to examine yourself, explore your beliefs, and find new ways to embrace and celebrate your cultures and identities,” a- she declared. “It’s the exquisite beauty of the education you receive here.”

Ted Brown ’23, a double major in architectural studies and environmental studies, said it was through his work in the entrepreneurship journey that he discovered a passion for sustainable real estate development.

“The incubator atmosphere taught me to think entrepreneurially and forced me to think about my future in a new light,” he said.

Brown completed three internships during her time at Conn, working with an environmental NGO, an architecture firm, and a real estate developer to explore her interests in sustainability. At the symposium, he presented case studies of a new 17-story apartment building in White Plains, New York, and a second 17-story building under construction in Stamford, Connecticut.

“Our ability to self-design much of our academic experience should not be taken for granted,” Brown told fellow students in a celebratory gathering at the end of the symposium. “I have met great friends within this cohort who have pushed my way of thinking. And I have found a place where I can integrate all of my interests. When I connect with graduates or other professionals in the real estate, I feel confident to tell my story.”




A student takes notes at the Fourth Annual All-College Symposium.


Hannah Gonzalez ’23, who also spoke at the celebratory event, recalled attending the first All-College Symposium as a freshman in the fall of 2019.

“My freshman seminar traveled in packs that day, curiously exploring the various presentation panels and poster sessions showcasing the work of our upperclass peers. I was inspired by how these students took their academic interests outside of the classroom and began meaningful work in their areas of interest,” she said.

A government major and philosophy minor, Gonzalez joined the Holleran Center for Community Action and Public Policy. She first became interested in police reform due to her experience growing up in a low-income, predominantly immigrant neighborhood in Chicago. But she soon realized that “the social issues that had plagued the neighborhood I grew up in were part of an overall question about which countries can or should integrate and accept people from outside their own borders”.

She studied U.S. refugee policy and international human rights and served as a policy and advocacy officer for the International Rescue Committee, assisting one of the world’s leading refugee resettlement and development organizations. humanitarian with research projects and policy recommendations. She is currently completing a capstone project and applying to law school to pursue a career in human rights law.

“With the support of Holleran Center students and staff, I have cultivated a clear vision of the type of changemaker I want to be,” Gonzalez said. “There are hundreds of seniors here today who share this experience of personal growth through an education at Connecticut College. I’m immensely proud of all we’ve accomplished in our four years here, and I can’t wait to see the impact we’ll have on the world.

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Eileen O’Neall: Bringing hope abroad through the arts – APU Articles https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/02/eileen-oneall-bringing-hope-abroad-through-the-arts-apu-articles/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 07:44:28 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/02/eileen-oneall-bringing-hope-abroad-through-the-arts-apu-articles/ A trip changed the life course of Eilen O’Neall (’12). During his freshman year at Azusa Pacific University, O’Neall made a Student Action Center (CSA) trip to the Himalayas. O’Neall, who majored in music education and performance, was about to give music lessons at a home of Mother Theresa in Kolkata when she saw a […]]]>

A trip changed the life course of Eilen O’Neall (’12). During his freshman year at Azusa Pacific University, O’Neall made a Student Action Center (CSA) trip to the Himalayas. O’Neall, who majored in music education and performance, was about to give music lessons at a home of Mother Theresa in Kolkata when she saw a blind boy begging for change. “He was singing and he had such a beautiful voice,” O’Neall recalled. “It was the first time I saw the effects of human trafficking. It was an eye-opening experience.

Many children like this in the region and around the world are intentionally abused by adults because they are likely to earn more from begging if they are disabled. “I learned that his eyes had been damaged on purpose. It didn’t sit well with me and I knew I had to react,” O’Neall said. After returning to California, she began researching the problem and what was being done to combat it. “I asked myself, what can I do as a music teacher? How can I help solve this problem? »

O’Neall returned to South Asia after completing her undergraduate studies at APU. “The reality of the vulnerable children I had encountered in the Himalayas never left me,” she said. O’Neall decided to found a non-profit organization, International Creative Hope, with a small group of artists, all connected from APU. They have run music and dance camps in South and Southeast Asian countries with high rates of human trafficking. The camp had an impact on the lives of these children. “Girls who had been rescued from abuse and trafficking learned to express themselves through dance, reclaiming their bodies for something beautiful. It gave them so much confidence. Counselors said it was amazing to see how much of a contrast there was between the girls after camp.

Although the group was limited by their school schedules, including O’Neall who was pursuing his master’s degree at Cal State Long Beach, they traveled the world again the following year to continue camp. After completing her master’s degree, O’Neall moved to South Asia and working with Creative Hope International became a full-time job. Since then the association has grown with a team of local staff in the Himalayas and a long-standing partner in Southeast Asia. They have helped over 1,000 people since 2014 by teaching singing, musical instruments, folk music and dance. “We believe that love and creativity change oppressive minds and systems. When people create, they can embody justice, beauty and hope,” O’Neall said. “Music and the arts offer a powerful avenue for healing, restoration and empowerment.We give students channels of connection where they can realize their potential and have a better future.

Much of the impact O’Neall has through her nonprofit organization is a result of the musical education she received at APU. From serving in the college choir and orchestra to participating in CSA mission trips, O’Neall said she was equipped for her current work throughout her time at APU. . “I absolutely loved my ethnomusicology class. It’s particularly useful for my teaching today because it explores music in different cultures. Classical Western music is not as appropriate in South Asian music classrooms,” she said. “Music education classes made us do a lot of observational and participatory learning, which was really useful.” While his music lessons were essential to his current teaching, one of O’Neall’s greatest learning moments came in his Christian Life Faith and Ministry class with Michael Bruner, PhD. “I realized that being what God called me to be is like Christ.”

Faith plays a major role in O’Neall’s life and work. “I believe that God loves everyone, especially these vulnerable children. My faith keeps me going and facing challenges with confidence,” she said. “My work is 100% based on his loyalty and his promises.” O’Neall said she has seen many examples of God moving in the Himalayas, including stories of her students letting go of negative and oppressive labels. “I get a glimpse of the story God is weaving, and I love to see how God’s love changes people’s hearts and lives.”

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Canine behaviorist warns UK dog owners ahead of Halloween weekend https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/30/canine-behaviorist-warns-uk-dog-owners-ahead-of-halloween-weekend/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 09:10:18 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/30/canine-behaviorist-warns-uk-dog-owners-ahead-of-halloween-weekend/ A dog The behaviorist, owner of Ryecroft Meadow in Wrexham, has warned dog owners against dressing up their furry friends in Halloween costumes. They ask owners to think about the potential impact putting a dog in a costume can have on their behavior. Although you may think that your dog looks adorable when dressed in […]]]>

A dog The behaviorist, owner of Ryecroft Meadow in Wrexham, has warned dog owners against dressing up their furry friends in Halloween costumes.

They ask owners to think about the potential impact putting a dog in a costume can have on their behavior.

Although you may think that your dog looks adorable when dressed in his scariest outfit, you need to be aware of his wellbeing and behavior.

Some dogs might like to be dressed up, but others don’t like the idea.

Peeblesshire News: A dogA dog (Image: Canvas)

Handling dogs while putting them on costumes can stress them out, especially if the costume has to be put on their head or their legs have to go through sleeves.

Something owners may not realize is that their dog can seem fine even when it isn’t.

The canine behaviorist explains that there are four Fs to watch out for in stressful situations: fight, flight, freeze or fuss.

You should take your dog out of the costume when it is safe to do so if they are:

  • Roll up, try to break free
  • Pulling the costume with his teeth or paws
  • Refusing to move or frozen in fear

You should never ignore these signals and be wary of aggression, as this is how some dogs try to get away from whatever makes them uncomfortable.

Aggression can occur especially when owners ignore the more subtle warning signs.

Warning signs can include:

  • Licking nose or lips
  • Yawn
  • Turn head or body and walk away

It can also quickly turn into growls, clicks, and bites.

Freeze’s response might come after they try to get out of the suit.

It is extremely common for dogs, when wearing outfits, to freeze up and emotionally shut down. They also stop trying to escape because they feel they can’t get out.

Some costumes may cover a dog’s face or restrict its movement, so much so that it may be unable to exhibit its usual behaviors.

The costume may make some dogs confused and not sure how to understand your dog when they wear it.

Peeblesshire News: A dogA dog (Image: Canvas)

Owners may also find it difficult to understand the dog’s behavior and misread its body language.

Dogs are also at risk of running away from the situation and hurting themselves in the process. They could also put themselves in danger if they are outside.

Injuries to the dog can occur, including getting stuck, swallowing objects, or losing balance and hurting themselves.

In worst-case scenarios, dogs can become stressed and experience life-threatening events.

When dogs have choice and control, they can excel at handling, but when they have to be restrained during a vet appointment, for example, it can be stressful for dogs and upsetting for them. owners.

The canine behaviorist encourages owners to work on cooperative care that trains dogs to tolerate handling and teaches them to be willing participants.

This requires classical conditioning, a process that means learning by association. For example, pairing things that dogs like, like treats, with handling can make them more comfortable.

This learning process can be used when it comes to clothing.


READ MORE: What happens if my dog ​​eats a conker?


When putting clothes on your dog, make sure he’s happy to be handled and doesn’t show distressing behaviors while wearing it.

You need to make sure the clothes give them a full range of motion and aren’t too tight which will affect blood supply or too loose which will allow them to get stuck.

The dog behaviorist asks you not to force your dog to wear something that does not benefit him and is just for human entertainment this Halloween.


Why Dogs Shouldn’t Eat Chocolate


Instead, to get pretty pictures, you can sit them next to pumpkins or in front of Halloween decorations, like the one available at Ryecroft Meadow.

If you want to find more information on how to keep your dog safe and happy this Halloween and Bonfire Night, you can visit the Train My Puppy Facebook page.

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China and the United States vie for the supremacy of quantum computing https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/27/china-and-the-united-states-vie-for-the-supremacy-of-quantum-computing/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 21:17:39 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/27/china-and-the-united-states-vie-for-the-supremacy-of-quantum-computing/ About an hour north of Manhattan, at IBM’s headquarters for research, an employee walks up to a glass door, leans down, and looks into a camera lens to open it with his eyeball . We enter a dark room with a glass cube the size of a jeep. “This is a real quantum computer,” says […]]]>

About an hour north of Manhattan, at IBM’s headquarters for research, an employee walks up to a glass door, leans down, and looks into a camera lens to open it with his eyeball .

We enter a dark room with a glass cube the size of a jeep.

“This is a real quantum computer,” says Scott Crowder, IBM’s vice president for quantum adoption.

In the center of it, suspended from the ceiling, is a shiny metallic cylinder the size of a barrel of oil.

“This shiny thing you see is where we keep our quantum processor. It must be really, really, really, really cold,” he said. “Like 100 times colder than outer space.”

There’s a hum in the background as the pumps create vacuums inside the computer to help it become cosmically cool. It’s at such a low temperature that materials begin to exhibit the weird physics at the heart of what a quantum computer does.

“It can store and manipulate information in entirely new ways using the laws of quantum mechanics,” said John Martinis, a physics professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, who worked on the quantum computing program. from Google.

The laws of quantum mechanics are, as Einstein called them, scary. At the atomic level, particles can be found in two states or even two places at the same time. A quantum computer exploits this frightening.

“The basic idea here is that in classical computation your data is represented by bits, which can be zero or one, and in quantum computation you have quantum bits or qubits. And it can be a mix of zero and one at the same time,” Martinis explained.

There are a lot more than that, but the fact is that it could allow quantum computers to do the kinds of calculations that traditional computers aren’t good at, Martinis said, “much, much faster than any supercomputer.” Martinis took part in the groundbreaking experiment in 2019 that demonstrated what is called quantum supremacy, where Google said its quantum computer was the first to perform a calculation that would be nearly impossible for a conventional computer. A group of Chinese scientists later showed that ordinary computers could, in a sensealso take on the task.

The hope is not that quantum computers will be faster or better for every problem, but rather for particular, complex problems.

“Simulating nature, so things like new drug discovery, new material development,” Crowder said. Mercedes Benz wants to use it to better understand the chaotic chemistry of batteries, for example.

Quantum computers might be able to help find patterns in complex data, Crowder said, “which therefore has applications in things like artificial intelligence and machine learning.” In a sea of ​​bank transactions, which are fraudulent?

They can also excel in what is called optimization. When a problem has a million options – say, say, a million different ways to lay out the floors in a factory – which one is the most effective? “So I can think about finance, portfolio optimization,” Crowder said.

There could of course be other uses not yet imagined.

But what has caught the attention of national security officials around the world is that quantum computing could one day break the encryption that protects just about everything on the internet — from your bank passwords to messages. companies, said Greg Allen, senior fellow in the Strategic Technologies Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

“China’s strategy is to intercept and download large amounts of encrypted data now in anticipation that within the next decade or two they will have quantum computers powerful enough to crack that encryption,” did he declare. The United States is currently developing quantum resistant encryption.

With all this potential for chaos and progress, investment money is pouring in.

“We project that by 2027, more than $16.4 billion will be invested in quantum computing,” said Heather West, research manager at IDC. “And it will be private investment, it will be investment in research and development, it will be government investment.”

There are now at least 89 quantum computing startups in the United States only.

“There’s a tsunami of hype about what quantum computers are going to revolutionize,” said Scott Aaronson, professor of computer science at the University of Texas at Austin. “Quantum computing has become a word that venture capitalists or people looking for public funding will sprinkle on anything because it sounds good.”

Aaronson cautioned that we can’t be sure these computers will actually revolutionize machine learning and funding and optimization issues. “We can’t prove that there isn’t a quantum algorithm that solves all these problems very quickly, but we can’t even prove that there isn’t an algorithm for a conventional computer that does it. do,” he said.

Back at IBM, Scott Crowder was well aware of the risk of over-promising what quantum computers can do.

“Quantum computers aren’t big enough or good enough yet to replace classical or do something that you can’t do on a classical computer yet,” he said. “That’s why we say that’s exactly what we have to do and deliver year after year to get there.”

IBM released a roadmap how he plans to evolve his quantum computers.

There are hundreds of research institutes, private companies and universities connecting to developing quantum computers. IBM has 190 partners exploring their technology.

“We have open access, which basically means free access for people to explore the technology and understand it, we have over 400,000 people who have signed up to use this open cloud access,” Crowder said.

Chinese technology giant Baidu has developed a quantum computer it is called Qian Shi and allows people to interact with its quantum chips through an app.

For now though, as technology develops, the main reason people use quantum computing is to figure out how they might use quantum computing.

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Ramsey Lewis celebrates the music of the Fab Four with posthumous CD ‘The Beatles Songbook’, his first solo piano recording, due out January 6 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/25/ramsey-lewis-celebrates-the-music-of-the-fab-four-with-posthumous-cd-the-beatles-songbook-his-first-solo-piano-recording-due-out-january-6/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 09:02:47 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/25/ramsey-lewis-celebrates-the-music-of-the-fab-four-with-posthumous-cd-the-beatles-songbook-his-first-solo-piano-recording-due-out-january-6/ Ramsey Lewis’ New CD, “The Beatles Songbook: The Saturday Salon Series, Volume One” [The Beatles] have a catalog of songs that can come across as fun to play standards and fun to play solo. I don’t know of any other pop group whose music has been recorded on all levels like this. RICHMOND, CA […]]]>

Ramsey Lewis’ New CD, “The Beatles Songbook: The Saturday Salon Series, Volume One”

[The Beatles] have a catalog of songs that can come across as fun to play standards and fun to play solo. I don’t know of any other pop group whose music has been recorded on all levels like this.

The late legendary pianist Ramsey Lewis offers an intimate and familiar affair with his solo piano recording “The Beatles Songbook: The Saturday Salon Series, Volume One,” which will be released January 6 on Steele Records. This selection of tracks from the iconic songwriting duo of John Lennon and Paul McCartney, approved for release by Lewis, is also a surprising DIY project, created during live-streamed sessions at Lewis’s own Chicago home.

Lewis, of course, is no stranger to postwar pop music coverage. He had a resounding success in 1965 with his cover of Dobie Gray’s “The In Crowd”, which he followed with a successful version of “Hang on Sloopy”. He’s even tested the Beatles catalog before, scoring a minor hit with “A Hard Day’s Night” and even releasing “Mother Nature’s Son”, a homage to the Beatles’ White Album, in 1968.

He was, however, a latecomer in unaccompanied piano performance. Until recent years, Lewis had hardly ever performed as a soloist. But the COVID-19 pandemic made it impossible to do anything else, and during the shutdowns Lewis launched a series of monthly webcasts called “The Saturday Salon.” Always an artist with a populist twist, Lewis included Beatles songs in his webcasts because it was music that, like his own, had demonstrated universal appeal.

“They have a catalog of songs that can become fun standards to play and fun to play solo,” he said. “Their music has been recorded by symphonies and orchestras, rock bands, jazz bands. I don’t know of any other pop group whose music has been recorded on all levels like this.

Even with their exhaustive coverage, Lewis is able to unlock new secrets and breathe new life into the tunes. His “And I Love Her” explores the possibilities of the song’s harmonies and its famous four-note riff. “Rocky Raccoon” gets a nice reharmonization. Lewis plays the gospel roots of ‘Hey Jude’ and in the ballads ‘Blackbird’ and ‘Golden Slumbers’ he finds previously unknown reservoirs of blues.

Taken straight from 2020’s live audio, “The Beatles Songbook” sounds like the home recording it is. But this sound is a feature, not a bug: it amplifies the intimacy of the performance, as if we were hearing a message from a friend, and reminds us that until the end, Lewis was able to work in all circumstances and create great art. .

Ramsey Lewis was born on May 27, 1935 in Chicago. He started playing the piano at the age of four, learning classical from teachers, gospel in church, and jazz from his father’s record collection. At Wells High School and Chicago Musical College, he intended to become a classical concert pianist, but fate intervened: While working at a record store, Lewis met bassist Eldee Young and drummer Red Holt, other jazz enthusiasts who joined him to form the Ramsey. Lewis Trio.

In 1965, after a decade of collaboration both at bandstands and on Leonard and Phil Chess’ Argo Records, Lewis and the trio achieved a surprise pop top 10 with their version of “The In Crowd”, recorded live. in Washington DC. The record made Lewis a star, which he added to with subsequent hits “Hang on Sloopy”, “A Hard Day’s Night” and “Wade in the Water”. After the trio disbanded, Lewis continued with new ensembles and continued to pursue pop-jazz success, resurfacing the pop charts with members of Earth, Wind & Fire on “Sun Goddess” in 1974. His popular hit continued into the 1980s and 1990s, when he formed the popular crossover band Urban Knights.

In the 21st century, Lewis has become a revered jazz statesman, finding a career renaissance as a composer, broadcaster, educator and artistic director of the Ravinia Jazz Festival. Lewis was awarded the NEA Jazz Masters scholarship in 2007. He spent his final year working with journalist Aaron Cohen on his memoir, “Gentleman of Jazz” (forthcoming May 2023 by Blackstone Publishing), before passing away at his home from Chicago in September. 12, 2022.

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Tàr Star Nina Hoss explains the world of classical music https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/21/tar-star-nina-hoss-explains-the-world-of-classical-music/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 16:12:53 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/21/tar-star-nina-hoss-explains-the-world-of-classical-music/ There is the saying that behind every great man there is a great woman – it’s a statement that has become more than commonplace. But it’s the one that makes sense in Todd Field’s huge film Tar, the director’s first in 16 years. It follows Lydia Tar, one of the greatest living composers and conductors, […]]]>

There is the saying that behind every great man there is a great woman – it’s a statement that has become more than commonplace. But it’s the one that makes sense in Todd Field’s huge film Tar, the director’s first in 16 years. It follows Lydia Tar, one of the greatest living composers and conductors, played with devilish abandon by Cate Blanchett. Field follows Lydia, the first female conductor of a German orchestra, as she prepares to record Symphony No. 5 by Gustav Mahler it will further deify his already illustrious career. But as Lydia begins this journey, she begins to lose it as the accusations and allegations against her begin to come to the surface.

And who exactly is the woman waiting in the wings, so to speak, Lydia? His wife, Sharon, who is also concertmaster and chief violinist of the orchestra. Played by the great Nina Hoss, Sharon, in addition to being the mother of their daughter, is also Lydia’s creative partner, a formidable musician in her own right, and perhaps complicit in maintaining the power structures that exist in the world. orchestra of Lydia Tàr.

For Hoss, as an actor, working with the famous Field was certainly a treat. It’s a movie that hasn’t quite left her yet – Hoss saw Tar three times and still finds details she hadn’t noticed in previous viewings. Many scenes in the film take place on an orchestral stage, practicing for Lydia’s tour de force symphony, with Sharon right next to her. Hoss talks to Thrillist about learning about the world of classical music and that community’s power hierarchies, and learning the violin.

Thrillist: You play Sharon, Lydia’s wife and concertmaster. What was it like immersing yourself in Berlin’s classical music world in Tar?
Nina Hos:I had to learn the parts of Mahler’s Symphony on the violin. I’m not a violinist, but I really wanted to be able to play with the musicians because I knew I was going to meet professional musicians for two weeks. I know they put so much work into it, and if you come as an actor, you’re a little impostor because you have to pretend. I wanted to make sure I put my work in too.

By doing this with my phenomenal teacher, I of course learned a lot about the whole German setup of an orchestra. They have rules. They have positions they are in. The time it takes to get into the first chair is such a feat. So that informed me for Sharon, that she’s an amazing musician in her own right because otherwise she wouldn’t be here. She’s the conductor’s partner in real life, but she’s also the musical partner. When you asked what I was doing, I learned the pieces, but then, of course, I spoke with the real concertmaster…

How was it?
He was next to me. You see him in the movie and he’s right in the chair next to me. Just to watch him, how he talks with the orchestra members, how in case there’s something, in this case, Todd [Field] sought. Then how he communicated and translated it, so to speak, with the orchestra. It told me so much about how I wanted to portray Sharon, that she’s the complete opposite of Lydia in a way that she uses her power. She is comfortable and an excellent communicator. She sees people, and she knows how to get what she needs from them, but in a non-abusive way. This doesn’t make her innocent as she maintains the Lydia Tàr system anyway.

That’s the other thing that interested me in working on Sharon: seeing who are the people who want to surround themselves with these personalities. Isn’t that also a transactional relationship? Are you not taking advantage of this relationship in some way? It was, in that particular setting of the world of classical music, really fascinating to explore.

This orchestra had not played together since COVID. How was the interaction with them, the filming with them and the rehearsal process?
I’ve never been in an orchestra, which in itself was somewhat unnerving and fascinating. I can only imagine how it must have felt for Cate to always be in front of them. She needed to get the respect of this orchestra, like a real conductor does, and me in another way too.

We were so lucky because this orchestra was so open, so excited to meet again, but also to make this film and to be with us. They really put a lot of work, love and heart into this. One of the most amazing moments I’ve had is when the first time we said, ‘OK, we’re going to rehearse’, and now we’re starting, and ‘Hey, we’re doing this snippet of the play . Go for it.” I still get goosebumps. It was just amazing. It gave them a better understanding of the world they live in and what they are fighting for. They are fighting for their art.

For Todd, I guess it was helpful to have real musicians rather than actors. Did you learn more about the world of classical music? Did you get a sense of their sense of community and politics that exists in their space?
It’s a tough world, I would say. It is a very hierarchical and also patriarchal world. I can’t even think where in major orchestras you have a female solo violinist. By the way, that’s something I really like that the movie doesn’t make a big deal out of it. It’s just two powerful people that are a couple, and they happen to be women.

Who influences the people who make the decisions that run an institution like this? Because you are constantly under surveillance. That’s what I learned as a concertmaster. The whole group of violinists, if you make mistakes or slip a little for some reason, there’s someone who wants your position. If you look at the Berliner Philharmoniker, for example, once you get that job, you probably won’t leave it. So, yes, you have couples coming out of it, but you also have haters who have to sit in the same orchestral body their entire lives.

It seems like such a different working ecosystem than what we are used to.
It’s very particular to the world of classical music, I suppose, in certain orchestras. Normally, it is also a very precarious job. They are mostly freelancers, and you might have a commitment of about three months. That’s why I think there’s room for abuse in some respects. So this movie really comes at the right time for the classical music world, I guess. Although having said that, I really think that because it’s about much more than music, this kind of abuse of power, Lydia could also be a CEO of a big company or something. It was interesting to see that it really feels like something the world of classical music needs to open up about, need to discuss and need to change.

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Who is Martha Argerich? Everything you need to know about the brilliant pianist https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/18/who-is-martha-argerich-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-brilliant-pianist/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 13:22:13 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/18/who-is-martha-argerich-everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-brilliant-pianist/ Martha Argerich is known as one of the finest pianists in the history of classical music, with her interpretations of – notably – Schumann, Prokofiev, Chopin, Fraying and Rachmaninoff topped lists of “greatest performers of all time.” But who is Martha Argerich? Where was she born and with whom did she study? Read on for […]]]>

Martha Argerich is known as one of the finest pianists in the history of classical music, with her interpretations of – notably – Schumann, Prokofiev, Chopin, Fraying and Rachmaninoff topped lists of “greatest performers of all time.” But who is Martha Argerich? Where was she born and with whom did she study?

Read on for our guide to this revered artist.

When and where was Martha Argerich born?

Martha Argerich was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1941. Her paternal family was originally from Catalonia, in northeastern Spain: however, they had settled in Argentina in the 18th century. Martha’s maternal grandparents, meanwhile, were Jewish immigrants from the Russian Empire, who had settled in Argentina in the late 19th century.

Did Martha Argerich have a musical education?

Yes: in fact, Argerich showed great promise from an early age. She began piano lessons at the age of three: two years later, she began to learn with the Italian pianist and teacher Vincenzo Scaramuzzawho emphasized to him the importance of lyricism and sentiment.

Who taught Martha Argerich?

The young Martha Argerich gave her first piano concert in 1949, at the age of eight. She performed Mozart Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor and Beethoven’s first piano concerto in C major. A little later, in 1955, Martha’s family moved to Europe, allowing Martha to study piano in Austria with the great classical and jazz pianist Frederic Gulda.

She also had lessons with pianists Abbey Simon and Nikita Magaloff, as well as with Madeleine Lipatti (widow of pianist Dinu Lipatti). The year 1957 was a red year for the young pianist: at only 16, Argerich won the Geneva International Music Competition and the Ferruccio Busoni International Competition within three weeks of each other.

However, not everything was simple at that time. Argerich had some frustrating times trying to study with the great, reclusive and enigmatic pianist Arturo Benedetti Michelangelo, who only gave him four classes in a year and a half. After that, the young Argerich left for New York, hoping to study with her pianist hero. Vladimir Horowitz – but that didn’t pay off either.

Disheartened, Argerich gave up the piano for three years and considered giving up altogether. However, she eventually returned – and in a certain style, winning the VII International Chopin Piano Competition in 1965 at the age of 24.

When did Martha Argerich make her first recording?

The pianist recorded her first recording in 1960, at only 19 years old.

The recording featured works by Chopin, Brahms, Fraying, Prokofievand Liszt, and was a critical success. In the decades that followed, Martha Argerich recorded works by a wide range of composers, specializing in the Romantic era. Indeed, his recordings of piano works by Robert Schumanas the Kinderszenen, Kreisleriana and Fancyundoubtedly represent the pianist at her expressive, emotional and virtuoso peak.

Where can I read an interview with Martha Argerich?

It may not be so easy. Argerich chose to stay on the sidelines for much of his career. This did not prevent her from being recognized as one of the greatest pianists of all time.

Did Martha Argerich appear at the Proms?

Yes, on various occasions. Famously, there was the Proms performance in 2016 when, at the age of 75, Argerich played Liszt’s First Piano Concerto in a performance led by his friend (and fellow Argentinian-born musician) Daniel Barenboim.

“It was an unforgettable performance,” said The Guardian. “His playing is still as dazzling, as frighteningly precise as it has always been; his ability to weave melodic threads as incomparable as ever.

Argerich has since also performed at the 2019 Proms, aged 78, to perform Tchaikovsky’s First Piano Concerto, again with Barenboim on the podium. The Guardian called the performance “hypnotizing”: “it bristled with intensity and intent from the first bar, so often propelled by the crystalline precision that still comes so naturally to it, and the lines of the slow movement floated with an ease in weightlessness. »

What are Martha Argerich’s best recordings?

We can help with that! Elsewhere on our site you will find a helpful sampling of some of the Martha Argerich best recordings. These include pieces by Chopin, Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, Mozart, Beethoven and more. Good listening !

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