Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 19:19:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 Art Industry News: Man repatriated 19 artifacts he inherited from his grandmother after reading about restitution + other stories https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/14/art-industry-news-man-repatriated-19-artifacts-he-inherited-from-his-grandmother-after-reading-about-restitution-other-stories/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 19:19:44 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/14/art-industry-news-man-repatriated-19-artifacts-he-inherited-from-his-grandmother-after-reading-about-restitution-other-stories/ Art Industry News is a daily summary of the most important developments in the art world and the art market. Here’s what you need to know on Monday, November 14. NEED TO READ Protesters spray ketchup on a statue in Parliament – Two members of the activist group Palestine Action posed as tourists visiting the […]]]>

Art Industry News is a daily summary of the most important developments in the art world and the art market. Here’s what you need to know on Monday, November 14.

NEED TO READ

Protesters spray ketchup on a statue in Parliament – Two members of the activist group Palestine Action posed as tourists visiting the British Parliament to spray ketchup on the statue of former Prime Minister Arthur Balfour, who signed the 1917 Balfour Declaration declaring his support for a ” national home for the Jewish people” in Palestine. They were arrested. (evening standard)

Sotheby’s to sell questionable Schieles – Two works by Egon Schiele, self-portrait (1910) and girl standing in white petticoat (1911), hitting the block tonight with a combined estimate of $10 million, have gaps in their Nazi-era provenance. The self-portrait mentions the Wolfgang Gurlitt Gallery, which dealt with looted art, as its first owner. A Sotheby’s spokesperson said none of the works had been flagged by industry databases. (Page 6)

Man repatriates 19 antiques after reading Guardian articles – Washington-based non-profit adviser John Gomperts has returned a treasure trove of ancient artefacts worth up to £80,000 ($94,108) which he inherited from his grandmother after reading reports in the Guardian on the refund. He contacted archaeologist Christos Tsirogiannis to find out where to start. Today he returned 12 artifacts to Greece, four to Italy, one to Pakistan and two to Cyprus. (Guardian)

Chris Bedford reveals his vision for SFMOMA – After six months of work, the new director of SFMOMA is beginning to articulate his vision for the institution. While he assured the board that he would be ‘quiet and measured’ in his first year, he said: ‘I found very quickly that this was not what the staff wanted. What the staff wanted was vision and action. (San Francisco Chronicle)

MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Courtauld appoints new manager – Mark Hallett, who has been director of the Paul Mellon Center for Studies in British Art at Yale University since 2012, will oversee the redevelopment of London’s Courtauld Institute of Art from April. (The arts journal)

Thomas Aillagon joins the Center Pompidou – The deputy general manager of Nice in charge of culture and heritage returns to Paris after only a year in the south of France. He will take up his duties as director of communication and digital at the Center Pompidou in January. (The Journal of the Arts)

Germany’s culture budget gets a boost – The federal government’s budget for culture and media will increase to 2.4 billion euros ($2.5 billion) in 2023, an increase of almost 4%, or 94 million euros ($97 million). dollars), compared to 2022. (Press release)

FOR ART

Anti-Iran Protest Comes to LACMA – A dozen activists dressed in black staged a performative protest to commemorate the 40-day anniversary of Zahedan”bloody fridaycrackdown, when nearly 100 people were killed by Iranian forces. Protesters handcuffed themselves to streetlights that make up Chris Burden’s Urban light (2008) installation outside LACMA. (Hyperallergic)

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The Darling wakes up in a new management company https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/12/the-darling-wakes-up-in-a-new-management-company/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 00:31:01 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/12/the-darling-wakes-up-in-a-new-management-company/ The owners of the Darling Hotel had little experience in hospitality. So the plan was still to hire a management company similar to Charlestowne Hotels. The Darling is owned by Courthouse Square Ventures, a limited liability company made up of Bob Ainley, Matt Ainley, and the Mouw, Robertson and Largoza families. Additionally, the partnership with […]]]>

The owners of the Darling Hotel had little experience in hospitality. So the plan was still to hire a management company similar to Charlestowne Hotels. The Darling is owned by Courthouse Square Ventures, a limited liability company made up of Bob Ainley, Matt Ainley, and the Mouw, Robertson and Largoza families.

Additionally, the partnership with Charlestowne Hotels creates more opportunities for employees. Seaward said employees can transfer to any of the 50 properties managed by Charlestowne Hotels. Additionally, in the event of a staff shortage, Charlestowne Hotels may send someone to assist the Darling Hotel, according to Seaward.

Charlestowne Hotels seeks to address both the “emotional and practical” aspects of hotel management, according to their portfolio. The company focuses on budget planning, reputation management and prioritizing customer experiences. They specialize in lifestyle, brand, soft-brand and condo properties, ranging from well-known hotels such as the Holiday Inn, to boutique-style hotels in rural California, such as the Darling.

“We never tire of the excitement that comes with meeting new owners and supporting them as they evolve the vision for their properties,” Kyle Hughey, general manager of Charlestowne Hotels, said in a statement. “The Darling’s historical ties and architecture take guests back to California’s Art Deco period.”

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Inside Meret Oppenheim’s ‘Otherworldly, Witty, Whimsical’ exhibition at MoMA, the first American museum retrospective of the Swiss surrealist in a generation https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/09/inside-meret-oppenheims-otherworldly-witty-whimsical-exhibition-at-moma-the-first-american-museum-retrospective-of-the-swiss-surrealist-in-a-generation/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 11:30:59 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/09/inside-meret-oppenheims-otherworldly-witty-whimsical-exhibition-at-moma-the-first-american-museum-retrospective-of-the-swiss-surrealist-in-a-generation/ If you know the name Meret Oppenheimyou probably associate the artist with one thing: fur. A new exhibition at modern Art Museumhowever, proves that the Surrealist was an artist of endless creativity and incredible versatility who drew, painted, and sculpted in a wide range of mediums and materials. “She just had a remarkable imagination and […]]]>

If you know the name Meret Oppenheimyou probably associate the artist with one thing: fur. A new exhibition at modern Art Museumhowever, proves that the Surrealist was an artist of endless creativity and incredible versatility who drew, painted, and sculpted in a wide range of mediums and materials.

“She just had a remarkable imagination and an unparalleled ability to get up in the morning and never do the same thing twice,” Anne Umland, the museum’s senior curator of painting and sculpture, told Artnet News. “It’s pretty radical that over her five-decade career she’s managed to stay committed to a very supernatural, witty, whimsical sensibility.”

The show, titled “Meret Oppenheim: My exhibitionis the artist first American exhibition in 25 years, and it features many plays presented for the first time in the country. It originated at the Kunstmuseum Bern in Switzerland, which has the largest collection of works by the artist in the world, and is co-curated by the two museums and the Houston Museum. Menil Collection.

Meret Oppenheim, Object (Object) (1936). Photo courtesy of Museum of Modern Art, New York.

The MoMA is the last stop on the transatlantic tour, and it has a strength that other venues lack: Objectthe fur-covered teacup, saucer and spoon that earned Oppenheim his place in the art history books.

Too fragile to travel, the work is a mainstay of MoMA’s collection, even though the acquisitions committee has repeatedly rejected it.

“When it first arrived in 1936, it sort of became the poster child for all that was absurd and anti-art in the surrealist approach to art making,” Umland said.

Meret Oppenheim, <i>Pair of gloves</i> (1985).  Collection of the Kunstmuseum Bern, gift of Ruth von Büren.  Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.  “width=”1024″ height=”939″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/08/cri_000000266847-1024×939.jpg 1024w, https://news.artnet.com /app/news-upload/2021/08/cri_000000266847-300×275.jpg 300w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/08/cri_000000266847-50×46.jpg 50w, https://news .artnet.com/app/news-upload/2021/08/cri_000000266847.jpg 1570w” sizes=”(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px”/></p>
<p id=Meret Oppenheim, Pair of gloves (1985). Collection of the Kunstmuseum Bern, gift of Ruth von Büren. Courtesy of the Museum of Modern Art.

Fortunately, founding director Alfred Barr had the good sense to buy Object himself after debuting at MoMA “Fantastic Art, Dada and Surrealism” exhibition that year, giving the the institution’s time to come to pioneer work.

Oppenheim, born in Germany in 1913, was only 22 when she made the work, a time when she supported herself by making jewelry. A fur-covered bracelet she had made caught the attention of Pablo Picasso and Dora Maar as the three of them were having lunch. When Picasso pointed out that anything could be improved by fur covering, Oppenheim’s wheels started turning.

Having made a name for himself in the art at such a young age, Oppenheim had a somewhat complicated relationship with Object. She was proud of her role in the surrealist movement as a young woman and her ability to channel the avant-garde spirit even as she resisted being defined by one piece. But it also overshadowed other aspects of his career.

Meret Oppenheim, X-ray of MO's skull (Röntgenaufnahme des Schädels MO).  (1964/1981).  Hermann and Margrit Rupf Foundation.  Bern Kunstmuseum.

Meret Oppenheim, X-ray of the skull of MO (Röntgenaufnahme des Schädels MO), 1964/1981. Hermann and Margrit Rupf Foundation. Bern Kunstmuseum. Photo courtesy of Museum of Modern Art, New York.

“It’s the kind of thing that’s just unforgettable,” Umland said. “Artist Jenny Holzer described it as ‘absurdly sublime.’ It’s also both seductive and repulsive, an everyday object and yet made strange.It takes something that is associated with decorum and domesticity, and makes it rather animalistic and spectacularly other.

The work also marks Oppenheim’s first exploration of themes that would become recurring.

“Oppenheim’s five-decade career has written great works to undermine long-held dualisms or opposition between things like man and nature, animate and inanimate objects, men and women – all of these binaries are things that the furry teacup undoes, and that the greater body of work continues to undermine in countless different and varied ways,” Umland added.

The title of the exhibition, “My Exhibition”, comes from the fact that it was organized in part in response to Oppenheim’s own carefully illustrated plans for a retrospective of his work, a series of drawings by 1983 which outline his career in chronological order.

Vue d'installation de The Green Spectator (1959) blocks a door between the galleries, a design choice considered by the artist in a set of 1983 drawings for a possible retrospective of his work. Photo by Jonathan Muzikar, courtesy of Museum of Modern Art, New York. ” width=”1024″ height=”604″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IN2507_010_CCCR-Press-Site-2000×1179-1-1024×604.jpeg 1024w, https ://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IN2507_010_CCCR-Press-Site-2000×1179-1-300×177.jpeg 300w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/ 2022/11/IN2507_010_CCCR-Press-Site-2000×1179-1-1536×905.jpeg 1536w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IN2507_010_CCCR-Press-Site-2000×1179-1-50×29 .jpeg 50w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IN2507_010_CCCR-Press-Site-2000×1179-1-1920×1132.jpeg 1920w, https://news.artnet.com/app /news-upload/2022/11/IN2507_010_CCCR-Press-Site-2000×1179-1.jpeg 2000w” sizes=”(max-width: 1024px) 100vw, 1024px”/>

Installation view of “Meret Oppenheim: My Exhibition” presented at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. His sculpture The Green Spectator (1959) blocks a door between the galleries, a design choice considered by the artist in a set of 1983 drawings for a possible retrospective of his work. Photo by Jonathan Muzikar, courtesy of Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Although MoMA curators have given themselves the liberty to deviate from Oppenheim’s plans, the placement of his large 1959 sculpture The Green Spectator blocks a door between the galleries, as the artist designed it.

In addition to Object, the exhibition features a handful of other works from MoMA’s collection. There is a striking X-ray photography of the artist’s head, recently acquired at an auction in Europe, and a large painting Red head, blue bodythat Oppenheim used to hang above his bed, bequeathed to the museum by will.

“She saw great significance in it for her surreal early years and wanted to make sure the furry teacup had a companion. It’s the exact same year, which goes a long way to undoing that idea that she wasn’t making it up. than stuff covered in fur,” Umland said.

Meret Oppenheim, Red Head, Blue Body (1936).  Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Meret Oppenheim Bequest.  Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Meret Oppenheim, Red head, blue body (1936). Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York, Meret Oppenheim Bequest. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

But most of the works on display are on loan from Switzerland, where most of Oppenheim’s oeuvre still resides. That means there’s a lot to discover in the exhibition, from delightful collages to surprisingly deft oil paintings that reveal Oppenheim’s considerable draughtsmanship, such as stone woman (1938).

“There’s this bravery technique that renders all kinds of textures, you can look at the shimmering surface of the water and underneath see that the little legs of the figure have socks and Mary Jane shoes,” Umland told about work. “It has almost levels of translucent layered glazing and paint application.”

Meret Oppenheim, Stone Woman (1938).  Private collection.  Photo by Sarah Cascone.

Meret Oppenheim, stone woman (1938). Photo by Sarah Cascone.

“That idea of ​​magic, enchantment and transformation, the themes of isolation, entrapment and loneliness that were so characteristic of Oppenhein’s world in the late 1930s are present in this painting,” he said. -she adds.

Viewers also might not expect Oppenheim’s talent for assemblage, crushing found objects to delightful surreal effect. Another strong point is animal-headed demon (1961), a neoclassical clock case which the artist modified by plunging a large wedge of wood through its face and adorning it with ceramic knobs.

And then there’s Oppenheim’s undeniable sense of humor. A work from 1936, My Governess (My Nurse)features a pair of upside-down white pumps on a silver platter, tied like a roast chicken, decorative paper ruffles covering the heels.

Meret Oppenheim, <em>My Governess (My Nurse)</em>, 1936. Collection of the Moderna Museet, Stockholm.  Photo by Sarah Cascone.” width=”768″ height=”1024″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IMG_6263-768×1024.jpg 768w, https:// news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IMG_6263-225×300.jpg 225w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IMG_6263-1152×1536.jpg 1152w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IMG_6263-1536×2048.jpg 1536w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IMG_6263-38×50 .jpg 38w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11/IMG_6263-1440×1920.jpg 1440w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/11 /IMG_6263-scaled.jpg 1920w” sizes=”(max-width: 768px) 100vw, 768px”/></p>
<p id=Meret Oppenheim, My Governess (My Nurse), 1936. Collection of the Moderna Museet, Stockholm. Photo by Sarah Cascone.

The shoes come into play again decades later with the 1967 sculpture The Couple (with Egg)of a pair of boots sewn together at the toes, sitting next to an egg perched on a nest of coiled shoelaces.

“She was trying to imagine what shoes left outside a hotel room door would do – of course they would mate!” said Ulmand.

Even for the curator, the breadth of the artist’s wildly inventive career was unexpected. “Being someone who worked as an academic, art historian and curator in the interwar period, I hadn’t realized how vast the body of work is,” Ulmand said. . “To see what she did in the 1940s, 1950s, 1960s and 1970s is just mind boggling.”

Meret Oppenheim: My exhibitionis on display at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, from October 30, 2022 to March 4, 2023.

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UC Berkeley is seeing an increase in humanities majors. Beginning of a trend or just an exception? https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/06/uc-berkeley-is-seeing-an-increase-in-humanities-majors-beginning-of-a-trend-or-just-an-exception/ Sun, 06 Nov 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/06/uc-berkeley-is-seeing-an-increase-in-humanities-majors-beginning-of-a-trend-or-just-an-exception/ The University of California at Berkeley reports that, compared to last year, it saw a 121% increase … [+] increase in the number of freshmen declaring a major in arts and humanities. Getty For years, the dominant narrative about humanities on college campuses has been that it is in steep decline, with the number of […]]]>

For years, the dominant narrative about humanities on college campuses has been that it is in steep decline, with the number of students choosing to major in one of the humanities fields steadily declining for more than a year. decade.

But now here’s a little good news – the University of California, Berkeley reports that it is experiencing a substantial rebound among students interested in training in the humanities.

Here are three relevant statistics Berkeley cites to support its claim:

  • The number of people applying to Berkeley to become freshmen majoring in the Arts and Humanities Division is up 43.2% from five years ago and 73% from 10 years ago.
  • The number of freshmen reporting an arts and humanities major increased 121% from last year.
  • Several departments – including artistic practice, comparative literature, philosophy, music, art history and film and media – report the highest number of applicants in a decade.

Commenting on the numbers, Sara Guyer, dean of Berkeley’s arts and humanities division and director of the World Humanities Report, pointed to recent global events, such as the pandemic, which may have led to more students turn to the human sciences because of their interest. to meet global challenges.

“Many of us, in our own way, have found ourselves in an unprecedented series of situations without a compass or a guide,” she explained. “It’s not at all surprising that students are turning to the arts and humanities to make sense of our current moment. Imaginative, ethical, creative and analytical contributions and historical observations of research and artistic production in the humanities offer a valuable means of understanding the complexities brought about by contemporary challenges.

If anything close to the Berkeley increases were to be replicated at other institutions, it would represent a dramatic turnaround in what is generally described as a 25% decrease in undergraduate degrees in the humanities since 2012. (At University levelhumanities masters fell 18.5% and doctorates fell about 9% from their respective peaks.)

The most comprehensive data on college graduate majors is maintained by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), which tracks the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded by US colleges and universities in 32 fields. (Think of a field of study as a major or set of related majors.)

According to NCES, between 2009-2010 and 2019-2020, the total number of bachelor’s degrees awarded increased by 24%, from about 1.6 million degrees to about 2.0 million degrees, but there are there have been great changes in the fields in which graduates have specialized.

Considering only majors that had at least 5,000 graduates in 2019-20 (the most recent year for which data is reported), nine fields of study saw a drop in the number of bachelor’s degrees awarded during this period ten years despite the overall increase in the number of college graduates. Of these nine fields, six (English Language/Literature, Foreign Languages, Liberal Arts/Humanities, Theology, Area/Ethnic/Cultural/Gender Studies, and Philosophy/Religious Studies) fell under the fields of Humanities.

During this same period, practical and professional majors in business, health professions, and various STEM fields have seen substantial increases.

A handful of other signs suggest the humanities may be staging at least a small comeback.

  • At some universities – Georgia Tech is an example – there are anecdotal reports greater student interest in integrating the humanities into STEM programs. This interest may not translate into more majors in English, history, or philosophy, but it is likely to translate into more enrollment in a range of humanities courses.
  • Last year, Arizona State University reported that, from 2017 to 2019, the total number of freshmen and undergraduate transfer students majoring in the humanities at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences increased, with enrollment in online humanities programs increasing by 17% from fall 2017 to fall 2019.
  • Universities in the UK are seeing a boom in students pursuing higher education in the humanities, with the most popular subjects being English, media studies, journalism, library and information management, and history. In the creative arts, design, music, drama, art, film and creative writing are gaining ground.

The decline of humanities on college campuses has been attributed to several causes, including increased student interest in degrees that prepare them for careers, the lack of clear direction for many humanities programs, and a malaise perception that has plagued many of these disciplines for years.

But as more and more students choose profession-related majors, they may also find that a good life and a good job require more than technical skills, scientific know-how and ability. quantitative. It requires the ability to critically analyze, think creatively, communicate clearly and work cooperatively. It requires an ability to ask difficult questions and reject easy answers. It takes empathy. Students may find that the humanities offer them the best opportunities to cultivate these important habits.

So will Berkeley be a leader or an outlier on this? Is the humanities about to rebound nationally, or will its enrollment decline continue? Stay tuned for more on what could become an intriguing development.

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What happens when icebergs collide with art https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/02/what-happens-when-icebergs-collide-with-art/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 22:10:14 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/11/02/what-happens-when-icebergs-collide-with-art/ Explore Ohen the hip hop artist and music producer Scary DJ first visited Antarctica in 2007, he was amazed at how quickly everything is changing there. Meltwater can be heard trickling down the edges of once solid glaciers; the waters echo with the creak and roar of icebergs as they melt. Natural changes on this […]]]>

Explore

Ohen the hip hop artist and music producer Scary DJ first visited Antarctica in 2007, he was amazed at how quickly everything is changing there. Meltwater can be heard trickling down the edges of once solid glaciers; the waters echo with the creak and roar of icebergs as they melt. Natural changes on this scale are expected to take millennia. After all, the Antarctic ice sheet – almost 10 times the volume of its northern rival in Greenland – took millions of years to create. Now it is disappearing at speeds visible on human timescales. DJ Spooky felt like “geological time in slow motion” was “accelerated by human climate change”.

DJ Spooky has traveled to Antarctica to see firsthand the changes befalling one of the most sublime places on our planet, a landscape that has long seemed beyond human influence. His multimedia work Terra Nova: Antarctic Sinfonia incorporates videos and sounds he recorded from the ice and the ocean, accompanied by melodic strings that seem to alternate between lamentation and high-pitched urgency. He plays with movement, even manipulating the way the sound itself moves through the room, to bring what he calls an “emotional and immersive quality” to the experience.

In Melville’s poem, the natural world is still extremely powerful.

Icebergs have also cast their spell on Catherine Walker, glaciologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute. She too sailed among the Antarctic icebergs and was amazed by their tremendous beauty and fragility. To study changes in Antarctica, Walker works primarily with numbers: the physics of how icebergs are created and destroyed. But she is also fascinated by their stories. An iceberg is created when a chunk breaks off the edge of a larger ice cap, such as the one that covers Antarctica. Icebergs can be huge – as big as Rhode Island – and seem to have a life of their own.

One of his favorite icebergs “calved” (or broke away) from Antarctica the year he was born. It is large enough to show up on satellite images. “I watch it go around the Antarctic continent and shrink,” she says. Such stories help him – and others – care about the distant, abstract fate of a place as distant as Antarctica. “It’s not an interesting story to tell in a research paper,” admits Walker, but it drives his work: “I want to see what’s happening and help tell his story as the climate changes.”

These amazing transformations have their roots in the late 19th century, when the world seemed to be poised on a tipping point. The great marine writer Herman Melville captured this moment of transition in his poem “The Berg (A Dream)”. Reflecting on this poem, DJ Spooky and Walker take us out to sea, among the icebergs of an earlier time – a time before we feared the fragility of the Antarctic ice, but after we began to fear our own power to change the natural world.

The Bergtells the story of a bravely decked out military-designed ship that crashes into an iceberg. When the poem appeared in 1888, the Industrial Revolution was in full swing. The United States and other nations were rapidly urbanizing, once-abundant species were dwindling, and new forms of energy – steam, oil, electricity – were transforming human life. Today the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change uses the period from 1850 to 1900 as a benchmark to compare today’s post-industrial carbon dioxide levels. Melville had already seen many changes: even the whales that star in his epic Moby-Dick had been hunted relentlessly – on the brink of extinction for some species.

In Melville’s poem, the natural world is still extremely powerful. The devastating collision that sinks the ship – much like the Titanic would sink 24 years later – barely moves the iceberg. Yet the energy of human ambition hints at a different future, as explorers venture into even the most remote and hostile places.

The poem reads like a tongue twister: it is composed in the style of ancient Anglo-Saxon sagas of exploration, which used heavy alliteration. This very difficulty seems to capture Melville’s cultural moment, when the age-old drive for conquest meets contemporary sensibilities: awe, wonder, even a secret desire that nature will prevail in the end.

When he wrote this poem, Melville may have had in mind an image of the sloop of war USS Peacock facing the ice of Antarctica in 1840. The peacock had served in the War of 1812 and fought pirates in the Caribbean before going to Antarctica. as part of the United States Exploratory Expedition, commanded by Lieutenant Charles Wilkes.

FORCE OF NATURE: The power and dynamism of icebergs have inspired artists for centuries, as evidenced by this 1840 engraving USS Peacock in the ice depicting the ship’s perilous expedition to Antarctica. Illustration taken from Wikimedia Commons.

An engraving of the expedition, with which Melville was familiar, illustrates a terrifying episode in which the peacock was nearly crushed by icebergs. The icy cliff of the engraving towers over the proud ship, with “the dead indifference of the walls”, describes Melville. The Peacock had become trapped in an ice field, which had crashed down and disabled the rudder, making the ship nearly impossible to steer; a huge collision with an iceberg later destroyed parts of the ship’s stern. As the ship bounced, “an impending mass of ice and snow fell in its wake”. Wilkes tells us that “if it had dropped seconds earlier, it should have crushed the ship to atoms.”

The peacock was miraculously saved through an opening in the ice. Melville’s “martial construction ship” is not so lucky. The iceberg in the poem, “imminent tilt,” drops “huge icicles… / Sullen, in tons that crashed on deck.” At the time, the ice sheets of Antarctica represented the immense power of nature: sublime obstacles that stood in the way of the growing energy of industry. Antarctica seemed like the only place on Earth that humans were just not supposed to go. An explorer complained in 1832 that too many of his peers had fallen in love:

a superstitious idea that an attempt to reach the South Pole was a presumptuous intrusion into the terrible confines of nature, an illegal and sacrilegious intrusion into the secrets of the great Creator.

To fearful navigators, the ice of Antarctica had issued a divine warning: “You will come so far, but no further; and here your proud race will stop.

At that time, icebergs really seemed like “mountains of ice.” Like mountains, these icebergs seemed motionless and unchanging. They appealed to artists and writers like Melville, fascinated by physical and psychological extremes. In the 19th century, strong passions were in vogue, as were the sublimities of extreme landscapes. Painter Frederic Church took a perilous rowboat near several ice giants in the Arctic to paint “The Icebergs.” Two years after the painting was first exhibited in 1861, Church added the broken mast of a ship to suggest mankind’s helplessness in the face of these seemingly invincible natural wonders.

DJ Spooky and Walker say the Antarctic icebergs they’ve seen up close are as awe-inspiring and frightening as they were in Melville or Church’s days. Yet for both artist and scientist, it’s not just Melville’s ship that seems doomed. The ice, imposing as it may seem, is, at its core, just an impermanent “ghostly thing,” says Walker. As Melville writes, even the “hard berg” is “adrift dissolving, bound to death.” In 1888, climate change and global warming were still distant ideas, but already Melville had his eye on how the tables might turn.

Main image: Frederic Church, “The Icebergs” (1863). Credit: Wikimedia Commons.


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Local artists help bring Dia De Muertos celebration to life https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/30/local-artists-help-bring-dia-de-muertos-celebration-to-life/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 22:57:48 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/30/local-artists-help-bring-dia-de-muertos-celebration-to-life/ Gustavo James A tattoo artist and artist by trade, Jaimes recalls when the Ducks came to town in 1993 and how he felt “instantly hooked” after watching his first game. He recalls an early love of goalkeepers because “they were the ones who had the artwork on their masks”. “That’s what got me into hockey,” […]]]>

Gustavo James

A tattoo artist and artist by trade, Jaimes recalls when the Ducks came to town in 1993 and how he felt “instantly hooked” after watching his first game. He recalls an early love of goalkeepers because “they were the ones who had the artwork on their masks”.

“That’s what got me into hockey,” Jaimes said. “I like the history of hockey, how old it is. I like the teams, the uniforms and the logos.”

Jaimes designed the warm-up jerseys the Ducks will wear before the game on Sunday night, an admittedly surreal experience after drawing the Mighty Ducks logo thousands of times in the yards over the years.

“It’s going to be unreal to see them for real,” Jaimes said with a big smile. “I would love to have this in my family history. Seeing the photos and bringing them to life in front of me, I am incredibly proud and thrilled to be a part of this.”

Jaimes knows the moment to see the Ducks come out of the tunnel and onto the ice in his jerseys will be emotional.

“I’m shaking now just talking about it,” he said. “I can only imagine the feeling. It’s going to be very surreal. I can’t say how it’s going to hit me. Like wow, it’s real. I never, ever imagined this in my wildest dreams .”

He said the theme of remembering the holidays inspired him to create a shirt featuring the club’s original logo combined with the celebration’s classic use of bright and vibrant colours.

“You honor the past and you don’t forget your loved ones,” Jaimes said. “Now is the time to be joyful, to remember them and to have a good time.”

Jaimes is also proud to be a key part of an evening meant to welcome more new fans into a community he loves.

“To see my friends represented in their culture is amazing,” Jaimes said. “I’ve always appreciated the support that the Ducks give to that and to the community, keeping the traditions alive and exposing them to people who don’t know, showing the history. It’s a huge role.

“I think it brings in people who had no idea they could be represented by a sports team, you know? Especially if it’s their local team, like that. It makes people become hockey fans and want to be part of it.”

Jaimes, who also designed a Dia De Muertos poster for the Ducks in 2019, also hopes to be back for more in the years to come.

“That’s how you make a change,” he said. “You want to have people that you can relate to…To be able to be with like-minded people and people who look like me, it’s amazing. You don’t feel so alone. You feel like to know that and it’s such a beautiful connection.”

Kimberly Duran and Bud Herrera

Duran and Herrera are known as the “Heavy Collective”, traveling the West Coast and specializing in custom art.

Based in downtown Santa Ana, the two have been everywhere from San Diego to Los Angeles to Mexico City, working with universities, corporations, and recently even the Santa Ana Police Department.

They describe their style as unifying and organic, a mix of fine art and cutting edge.

“We use a lot of movement, and the reason a lot of people come to us is because we engage with communities and tell a lot of stories,” Duran said. “We never want to make anyone feel uncomfortable. Our art is not controversial. It is unifying. It brings people together. It transforms spaces.”

“Universal would be a good way to put it,” added Herrera. “It cannot be interpreted as any kind of negative.”

After Ducks management viewed the collective’s downtown Santa Ana mural, Duran and Herrera were asked to create the promotional poster for tonight’s celebration. They both said the priority was to ensure their design represented the sanctity of the holiday.

“When I develop the work, I try to always keep in mind and keep in mind where it comes from,” Herrera said. “I’m trying to do it justice. I consider it something that’s sacred to a lot of people. People literally go out of their way to change their family members and pay homage and dedication and dedication to that…You’re showing respect and homage, but at the same time there’s a deeper meaning behind it.”

“It represents embracing my roots and where I come from,” Duran said. “It’s exciting to see that it’s more accepted to practice these traditions and to evoke that in people of all colors.”

Herrera said he hopes those unfamiliar with the history of the holiday will take a moment on Sunday to take it all in and observe the beauty of the art.

“At the end of the day, art is beautiful, whether you understand it or not, that’s the beauty of art,” Herrera said. “You can interpret it any way you choose. That’s why often when we produce art, we never really put words into it to let the viewer know there’s no right or wrong answer. You can interpret it as you see fit.

“You’re here for the hockey. It’s great. But you can see a different twist and say, wow, that’s interesting. It takes you out of your comfort zone and out of the norm…Enjoy the game and of what you’re here to do and we’ll kind of give them a different perspective.”

Jose Ortiz

Ortiz proudly followed in his father’s footsteps. Son of a mural artist now specializing in the same trade, Ortiz’s latest creation will be exhibited in front of the Honda Center on Sunday.

“I wasn’t a bad student, but it was difficult for me to retain information for tests and homework, but when it came to drawing, I was so comfortable,” Ortiz recalls. “I was like, ‘wait a minute. I want to be like my dad.’ I started noticing that my drawings were pretty good, so I decided that was what I wanted to do.

“The feeling is special. People appreciate it. They appreciate the art.”

Ortiz, who loves drawing animals above all else and decorating his house with his fiercest depictions as motivation, is now on the other side of the mentor-mentee relationship, teaching his two daughters to paint.

“They love it now,” he said with a grin from ear to ear. “They start with their pencil work and start painting in acrylics. It’s just amazing.”

There is, however, a downside to new helping hands around the house.

“They write everywhere,” laughed Ortiz. “You think you can be prepared as a parent, but with the paintings, they’re going to write on the walls, on the couch, on the floor. They won’t care.”

Ortiz said that Sunday’s mural helped him learn more about the holiday’s history and fostered a greater appreciation for those who came before it.

“It’s about celebrating life,” he said. “It takes you back to when you were a kid… That’s what I want the work to express.

“It’s a pleasure, more of an honor, to be a part of it. We bring culture together, bring more people together. You pay attention to others. I appreciate that.”

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The Paintings of Life Under Franco by Juan Genovés, at the Marlborough Gallery – ARTnews.com https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/28/the-paintings-of-life-under-franco-by-juan-genoves-at-the-marlborough-gallery-artnews-com/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/28/the-paintings-of-life-under-franco-by-juan-genoves-at-the-marlborough-gallery-artnews-com/ “The painter constructs, the photographer reveals”, said Susan Sontag in her 1973 book On the photo. The late Spanish artist Juan Genovés did both in his powerful political paintings that draw on photography and cinematic techniques to highlight the atrocities of the Franco-era state. In “Juan Genovés: reconsidered”, Marlborough Gallery brings together around thirty works […]]]>

“The painter constructs, the photographer reveals”, said Susan Sontag in her 1973 book On the photo. The late Spanish artist Juan Genovés did both in his powerful political paintings that draw on photography and cinematic techniques to highlight the atrocities of the Franco-era state. In “Juan Genovés: reconsidered”, Marlborough Gallery brings together around thirty works produced between 1965 and 1975 which evoke with disturbing freshness the terror of totalitarian regimes. Executed mostly in grainy black and white or sepia to resemble newspaper images, Genovés’ paintings depict anonymous multitudes running under fire or focus on panicked individuals. Circular “spotlights” structure the compositions as if to suggest that these scenes are seen through a zoom lens or telescope. The images are presented with the apparent objectivity of news, but the raw fear is conveyed by the postures of the characters and by titles such as Los gritos (The screams) and The caza (The Hunt), both from 1967. At times the artist focuses the eye by adding color to its borders or washing the image pink, heightening the impression of bloodshed.

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Born in Valencia, Spain, in 1930, Genovés had a childhood marked by the Spanish Civil War and Franco’s fascist dictatorship. As an adult, he makes a resolutely political art, committed to democracy and the workers’ struggle. Rejecting what he saw as the elitism of abstraction, Genovés found his voice in a distinctive style of figurative painting that borrowed tools from Pop Art, such as stencils and stamps, to create eye-catching accessible images. . After seeing a 1962 exhibition on American pop art in Madrid, Genovés said, according to Marlborough’s catalog, “I began to understand that painting could be used to really say things”, that one should not not necessarily “only spots of abstraction”.

A horizontal painting in shades of gray divided into three vertical sections.  On the left is the aerial view of a crowd of people.  The middle shows a close-up of the crowd, in which bodies can be seen running.  The right panel is subdivided into three squares, each with a person with their arms up and near their head.

Juan Genoves: Los gritos (The Screams), 1967, oil on canvas, 35⅜ by 47⅜ inches.

Courtesy Marlborough Gallery, New York

Crowds were Genovés’ signature subject and they populate the majority of the works in this exhibition. In the catalog, the artist is quoted acknowledging the Odessa Marches Massacre sequence from Sergei Eisenstein’s film Battleship Potemkin as a source of inspiration: there are nightmarish paintings of fleeing hordes surrounded by walls (The wall1967) and crowds crawling on the ground like animals (The zoo, 1965). In several works, the canvas is cut into sections, allowing Genovés to present different points of view on an event, with no other reference than a white line which seems to delimit a threshold of danger; crossing it leaves bodies lying along the line, cut down by sniper fire.

Projectors are another effective narrative device. In The caza, a running man and woman are caught in a semicircle of light in the upper left part of the painting; at the bottom right, another projector highlights this couple being arrested, their hands raised against a wall. At other times, the point of view is aerial, the characters microscopic, moving like ants, as if observed by an omniscient eye. They are generalized, often stencilled depictions of silhouetted or faceless figures, but Genovés sought to dignify each person with individualized brushstrokes and airbrush marks. One could ask, instead of evoking photographs in painting, why not simply use photographs? Perhaps by brutally stylizing his compositions, which are largely devoid of locational details, Genovés strove to capture the essence of what ordinary Spaniards were experiencing during this brutal period; the lack of specificity made his images more widely applicable and arguably more powerful.

On a neutral background, there is a group of small dots which are actually crowds of people, each with dark hair and colorful clothes.

Juan Genoves: Derivatives2020, acrylic on canvas on board, 82⅝ by 63 inches.

Courtesy Marlborough Gallery, New York

Departing from the crowd and spotlight format, a series of acrylic on canvas works from 1973 painted in a darker palette. They show individuals being escorted, dragged and beaten by state agents, possibly under cover of night. Also included was a life-size mixed relief from 1965, Contra la pared (Against the wall), depicting a man and a woman with arms raised, and a pencil drawing from 1974 of a man in freefall, which could be read as a metaphor for life under Franco’s dictatorship.

After Franco’s death in 1975, Genovés continued to paint crowds but opted for exuberant colors, individualizing the figures by affixing pieces of detritus, such as a USB key or an earphone. These paintings were displayed in a separate room upstairs. Although devoid of the impact of the artist’s earlier works, they offer an uplifting complement, replacing the theme of shared terror with the joy of community. “Juan Genovés: reconsidered” revisits rather than sheds new light on the important work of the artist, but the topicality of the exhibition is striking; viewers will inevitably find discouraging echoes between these charged paintings and current threats to human rights and individual freedoms around the world.

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Start HIV antiretroviral therapy as soon as possible, experts urge https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/25/start-hiv-antiretroviral-therapy-as-soon-as-possible-experts-urge/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 21:19:31 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/25/start-hiv-antiretroviral-therapy-as-soon-as-possible-experts-urge/ WASHINGTON — Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with HIV may lead to better outcomes, particularly for people aged 35 and younger, a follow-up analysis of the BEGINNING test showed. For patients who have delayed ART until their CD4 count is below 350 cells/mm3there was a 21% risk of death or serious health […]]]>

WASHINGTON — Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in patients with HIV may lead to better outcomes, particularly for people aged 35 and younger, a follow-up analysis of the BEGINNING test showed.

For patients who have delayed ART until their CD4 count is below 350 cells/mm3there was a 21% risk of death or serious health consequences related to AIDS or not during the 5-year period following the start of treatment compared to patients who started ART immediately (P=0.09), reported Abdel G. Babiker, PhD, of University College London, in his presentation at IDWeek.

Even for patients who had a CD4 count greater than 500 cells/mm3 at the time of diagnosis, “it’s better not to delay treatment,” Babiker said MedPage today. “It’s a gradient; the earlier you start, the better. »

Of the patients who had previously delayed ART, 27 progressed to AIDS and 57 died compared to 15 and 47 in the immediate group. Serious health problems unrelated to AIDS, including cardiovascular disease, end-stage renal disease, decompensated liver disease, and non-AIDS-defining cancer, occurred in 88 patients in the delayed group versus 76 in the immediate group.

“These are critically important findings; we need to diagnose people earlier,” said Carlos del Rio, MD, of Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. MedPage today.

“Every time you do a blood test on someone who is at risk, you should do an HIV test,” he urged. “People don’t realize they have it until it’s too late.”

While the risk was worse for those who deferred therapy, Babiker noted the risk was there for everyone. “The risk of AIDS was not zero in patients receiving antiretroviral therapy, even among those who had complete viral suppression while receiving antiretroviral drugs. This finding indicates that damage to the immune system can occur early in life. HIV infection.”

However, one finding surprised the researchers: the disastrous results of delayed treatment were even more magnified in patients aged 35 and under.

In this younger age group, 44 patients in the delayed group had events related to the primary endpoint compared to 19 in the immediate group (HR 0.42, 95% CI 0.24-0.71) , whereas these figures were 69 and 70 in patients over 35 (HR 1.04, 95% CI 0.75-1.45; P=0.004).

“The risk seemed to be completely eliminated” in the older age group, Babiker said. His team did not understand why. “Uptake of antiviral therapy and suppression of viral load were very similar; these did not vary by age – we will still do further research on this age difference.”

The START trial was first initiated in 2009, enrolling 4,684 HIV-positive patients (median age 36 years, 27% female), who had CD4 counts ≥ 500 cells/mm3 (median 651 cells/mm3 ) at least 2 weeks apart within 60 days prior to registration. Of these patients, 2325 were randomized to start ART immediately and 2359 were randomized to delay treatment until their CD4 count was ≤ 350 cells/mm3.

In 2015, the results were published in the New England Journal of Medicine, showing that early treatment reduced the risk of serious AIDS-related events, serious non-AIDS-related health problems and death by 57%.

At that time, participants who had been on delayed ART had significantly lower CD4 counts (median 460 cells/mm3range 345-601) compared to participants who started ART immediately (median 648 cells/mm3range 580-764).

Subsequently, all START participants were treated with ART.

The current analysis included 4,436 patients and spanned from January 2016 to December 2021.

  • Ingrid Hein is a writer for MedPage Today covering infectious diseases. She has been a medical journalist for over a decade. Follow

Disclosures

The START trial was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases; national research institutes in Australia, Denmark, France, Germany, the United Kingdom and the United States; the University of Minnesota; and AbbVie, Bristol Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, GSK/ViiV Healthcare, Janssen Scientific Affairs and Merck.

The study authors reported no disclosures.

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What it means to be the Prince and Princess of Wales in 2022 – WWD https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/22/what-it-means-to-be-the-prince-and-princess-of-wales-in-2022-wwd/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 04:01:36 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/22/what-it-means-to-be-the-prince-and-princess-of-wales-in-2022-wwd/ LONDON – When Kate Middleton and Prince William stood shoulder to shoulder with Meghan Markle and Prince Harry greet the mourning crowds The death of Queen Elizabeth II last month they sent a crystal clear message about what kind of royals they want to be. Prince Williamfirst to the throne and with the new title […]]]>

LONDON – When Kate Middleton and Prince William stood shoulder to shoulder with Meghan Markle and Prince Harry greet the mourning crowds The death of Queen Elizabeth II last month they sent a crystal clear message about what kind of royals they want to be.

Prince Williamfirst to the throne and with the new title of Prince of Wales, put aside his high-profile differences with his brother and sister-in-law in the name of duty and respect for the late monarch.

A few weeks later, he made it known that he did not want an official investiture ceremony as Prince of Wales like the grand one his father had in 1969. Instead, he said that he wanted to earn the trust and respect of the people of Wales. .

On September 27, the royal couple made their first official Welsh visit with their new titles. They visited Anglesey, an island in Wales, where they resided between 2010 and 2013 when William was a helicopter pilot for the RAF. The mood was informal and optimistic, marking the end of the period of royal mourning.

The millennial Prince and Princess of Wales made it clear from the start that they wanted to be modern royals, connected to their subjects and to the issues of the day. They want to be seen as compassionate changemakers, advocates for UK charities and people and strong parents to their three children.

They are miles away from the generation of their parents and the former Prince and Princess of Wales, Charles and Diana. They also serve at a time when the idea of ​​royalty seems outdated to many and some members of the British Commonwealth are eager to part ways.

The couple – like William’s father, King Charles III – must modernize the monarchy in real time, out of a sense of duty and respect for their ancestors and because they need the institution to survive.

According to a survey by British Social Attitudes, 14% of under-35s believe the monarchy is not very important, compared to 44% of those aged 55 and over who believe it was essential to the country.

But preserving the crown is a difficult task.

Over the past four decades, the monarchy has undergone major changes – before the 1980s, society was a dusty establishment with no real zhuzh. Their image was so old-fashioned that they agreed to a television documentary in 1969, letting the cameras into their daily life and breaking the so-called fourth wall.

The famous English presenter David Attenborough, who then controlled the BBC 2 channel, insinuated that the film could have killed the monarchy because “the whole institution depends on a mystic and the tribal chief in his hut. If ever a tribesman sees inside the hut, then the whole system of tribal chieftaincy is damaged and the tribe eventually disintegrates.

Queen Elizabeth got the message: later, she had the documentary banned. It has not been shown on UK television since 1997.

Every once in a while, a big royal wedding signals the start of a new era for the monarchy. (Photo by David Jones – WPA Pool/Getty Images)

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When the 80s rolled around, the royal family’s most eligible bachelor, Prince Charles, found a wife in the young Diana Spencerwho gave the family a glamorous boost and kept them in tabloid headlines with her marriage woes, her split from Charles and her life as a divorcee.

By the time of Diana’s death, the life of the royal family had become a British soap opera and the future of the monarchy was once again in jeopardy. Many Diana supporters have questioned whether Charles should even be king and have lambasted his behavior and his relationship with Camilla Parker Bowles.

But William and Middleton, who married in 2011, represented a fresh start, a happily married couple who would do things differently and try not to repeat past mistakes.

It hasn’t been easy for William in particular.

He is fiercely loyal to the Firm, in public and in private. Her marriage is a united front; his philanthropic causes are aligned with those of Middleton; and he has been vocal when it comes to defending the institution in which he was raised.

But the family can’t seem to escape one misstep after another. There was Prince Andrew’s outrageous involvement with sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein that tarnished the entire monarchy. Then there was the marriage of William’s brother Harry to Markle, which brought Hollywood glitz to the monarchy, but the couple, with Markle’s star power and obvious desire to be royal players, threatened to eclipse the heir to the throne. Harry and Markle’s public feud with the family only made matters worse.

In 2021, William publicly responded to his brother and Markle’s claim about racism within the Royal Family by saying, “We really aren’t a racist family” during a visit to a school in India. east of London.

LONDON, UK - JUNE 05: (EMBARGOED FOR PUBLICATION IN UK NEWSPAPERS UNTIL 24 HOURS AFTER DATE AND TIME OF CREATION) Prince George of Cambridge, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Princess Charlotte of Cambridge, Prince Louis of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge stand on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Platinum Pageant on June 5, 2022 in London, England.  The Platinum Jubilee of Elizabeth II is celebrated June 2-5, 2022 in the UK and Commonwealth to mark the 70th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II's accession on February 6, 1952. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo /Getty Images)

Prince William and Kate Middleton on the balcony of Buckingham Palace with their children. (Photo by Max Mumby/Indigo/Getty Images)

Getty Images

The royal couple are confident in their priorities: the environment, mental health awareness, education, art, history and photography. It’s clear to them that just being royal by association is no longer enough, especially for the younger generation growing up with them.

There is no rule or pattern to follow. There’s Great Britain as a country at your fingertips, as well as the Commonwealth, which occasionally challenges the monarchy. For example, in November 2021, Barbados voted to remove the Queen as head of state.

GREAT ABACO, BAHAMAS - MARCH 26: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge during a visit to Abaco on March 26, 2022 in Great Abaco, Bahamas.  Abaco was dramatically hit by Hurricane Dorian which saw winds of up to 185 mph and left devastation in its wake.  Their Royal Highnesses learn about the impact of the hurricane and see how communities are still being rebuilt more than two years later.  (Photo by Samir Hussein - Pool/WireImage)

William and Kate visiting Great Abaco in the Bahamas. (Photo by Samir Hussein – Pool/WireImage)

Samir Hussein/WireImage

During William and Middleton’s Caribbean tour, the strategy was to curry favor with the region; instead, they were met with anti-colonial protests, which forced the couple to cancel their first official event in Belize, while in Jamaica, leaders prevented them from visiting the island.

An open letter supported by 100 leading figures in the country to William and Middleton read: ‘During her 70 years on the throne, your grandmother did nothing to atone and atone for the suffering of our ancestors during the entire period of the British slave trade of Africans, slavery, enlistment and colonization.

LONDON - NOVEMBER 16: Prince William and Kate Middleton arrive to pose for photos at St James's Palace State Apartments on November 16, 2010 in London, England.  After much speculation, Clarence House today announced Prince William's engagement to Kate Middleton.  The couple will marry in the spring or summer of next year and continue to live in North Wales while Prince William works as a sea rescue pilot for the RAF.  The couple got engaged on a recent vacation in Kenya after being together for eight years.  (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage)

Prince William and Kate Middleton announcing their engagement in November 2010. (Photo by Samir Hussein/WireImage)

WireImage

The couple responded with a diplomatic statement on their return to the UK: “For us, it doesn’t tell people what to do. It’s about serving and supporting them in the way they see fit, using the platform we’re blessed to have,” he said.

Although the couple model themselves on the queen, it can only go so far. The old adage ‘never complain, never explain’ is not one that works for today’s royals.

Keeping quiet in the era of using and seeking your voice can mark them as accomplices. In their new roles, William and Middleton seek to amplify their voices rather than stifle them. They have embraced their social media channels to relay their messages and the causes they care about.

In 2021, Middleton honored Sarah Everard, a 33-year-old woman who was murdered, by writing her family a heartfelt letter and attending her off-duty wake, a gesture of great compassion her late mother-in-law gave. often shown to the public.

Lord William Hague, chairman of the couple’s charity The Royal Foundation, told Sky News: “Certainly in the Royal Foundation we are not changing our tune, you know. On the contrary, we are stepping up a gear with a well-established tone about how to help solve some of society’s deepest issues that we need to bring people together to work on.

He added that although the royal family is apolitical, it is “quite fair for a royal family that is engaged in the world and wants to help people and serve people to engage with”.

The era of Elizabeth II is over, with its ups and downs. What will happen will be different from what history has witnessed.

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Part 3: Highlights of the Art of Time 2022 by Swiss Watch https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/19/part-3-highlights-of-the-art-of-time-2022-by-swiss-watch/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 03:12:28 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/10/19/part-3-highlights-of-the-art-of-time-2022-by-swiss-watch/ Art of Time returns this year from October 12 at the Pavilion Kuala Lumpur, marking two incredible decades of Swiss Watch in fine watchmaking in Malaysia. Under the theme “Defining Moment”, the highly anticipated event headlined by 18 watchmakers presents a unique partnership with five top Malaysian talents. Here are some watches to watch out […]]]>

Art of Time returns this year from October 12 at the Pavilion Kuala Lumpur, marking two incredible decades of Swiss Watch in fine watchmaking in Malaysia. Under the theme “Defining Moment”, the highly anticipated event headlined by 18 watchmakers presents a unique partnership with five top Malaysian talents. Here are some watches to watch out for.

BOVET 1822

The Virtuoso VII represents the pinnacle of technical and artistic talent available from Bovet. In this perpetual calendar with retrograde date, a sophisticated complication in itself, the watchmakers have sought to make things interesting by innovating in the layout of the calendar functions and by relying on not one but two dials equipped with a mechanism patented dual coaxial seconds. Each component, visible or not, is decorated using traditional artisanal methods.

In the 43.3mm red or white gold case, the hand-wound caliber 13BM12AIQPR – which offers five days of autonomy in a single barrel – ticks under a delicately guilloché dial and embraces the wrist by means of a bracelet in alligator leather. The Virtuoso VII comes with the iconic Amadeo patented system that allows the watch to be used as a wristwatch, pocket watch or desk clock without the need for tools.

JAQUET DROZ

Produced in just eight copies to celebrate the 300th anniversary of Pierre Jaquet-Droz, the Bird Repeater, an automaton equipped with a minute repeater function, embodies the essence of the house. Its white mother-of-pearl and black onyx dial features 18-carat red gold appliques. The watch displays the quintessence of Jaquet Droz and three centuries of heritage, in a single resolutely contemporary creation.

Multiple bird animations, hatching eggs and the river in the background – inspired by the Ronde that crosses La Chaux-de-Fonds, in western Switzerland – bring this watch to life. This weaving of complex animations, entirely engraved and painted by hand, resonates with a minute repeater, one of the most virtuoso complications in fine watchmaking, housed at the heart of its 47 mm 18-carat red gold case. . This watch pays homage to the cradle of Swiss watchmaking.

BREMONT

Subjected to the same rigorous testing as live ejection seat launches, Bremont’s MB Savanna is a pilot’s watch with a difference, particularly the unusual desert-inspired hue of the 43mm grade 5 titanium case, metal dial and rubber strap. It has two knurled crowns for setting the time and the inner rotating bezel, a movement support that protects the movement from extreme shocks and is powered by the modified caliber BE-36AE automatic chronometer.

MAURICE LACROIX

The latest addition to the Pontos family by Maurice Lacroix, the PONTOS S chronograph is sporty and elegant. With a scratch-resistant ceramic bezel, tachymeter scale and stainless steel case, the placement of the two chronograph counters, seconds display and day and date window provide a refined aesthetic. It is powered by the automatic caliber ML112 with Côtes de Genève, perlage and sunburst decoration, surmounted by a silver-white or dark blue sand-blasted dial with hands lined with SuperLumi-Nova for maximum readability.

ORIS

Heir to a pilot’s watch that dates back over 100 years, the ProPilot X Caliber 400 incorporates one of Oris’ next-generation high-performance automatic mechanisms in a robust 39mm titanium case. The in-house movements of the Caliber 400 series all include high levels of anti-magnetism, a five-day power reserve and a 10-year warranty. A joy to behold, from every angle.

TISSOT

Previously only available with time and date functions, Tissot’s PRX line now features a high-performance chronograph. Within the case of the new 42mm PRX automatic chronograph is an inverted panda dial – where the white sub-dials are set against a contrasting black background – and the Valjoux A05.H31 caliber, which features an extended power reserve of 60 hours. The chic 1970s sports watch has never looked so good.

Other exhibitors include Bianchet, Charles Girardier, Raidillon and Speake-Marin.

Defining Moment by Art of Time 2022 is presented by Swiss Watch and will take place October 12-23 (10am-10pm) at Pavilion Kuala Lumpur Center Court. See here for more.

This article was first published on October 10, 2022 in Swiss Watch’s Art of Time.

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