Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 01:36:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 Colt DCS appoints David Crowther as company chief financial officer https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/27/colt-dcs-appoints-david-crowther-as-company-chief-financial-officer/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 01:36:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/27/colt-dcs-appoints-david-crowther-as-company-chief-financial-officer/ Crowther to facilitate finance team development and business growth LONDON, June 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Colt Data Center Services (DCS), a leading global provider of large scale and enterprise data center solutions, today announced the appointment of David Crowther the role of chief financial officer (CFO). Crowther will be responsible for leading and developing Colt […]]]>

Crowther to facilitate finance team development and business growth

LONDON, June 27, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Colt Data Center Services (DCS), a leading global provider of large scale and enterprise data center solutions, today announced the appointment of David Crowther the role of chief financial officer (CFO). Crowther will be responsible for leading and developing Colt DCS’ finance team to support and align with the company’s ambitious growth plans.

Colt DCS Logo

Crowther brings over 20 years of experience in senior finance positions, previously holding CFO roles at TelecityGroup and more recently Carillon Communications. At TelecityGroup, he was responsible for leading the financial aspects of the company’s IPO and eventual sale to Equinix.

“I am delighted to join Colt DCS at this time of immense growth, and following its ambitious expansion plans announced earlier in the year. I am committed to ensuring that the finance team is an integral part of continuing to elevate Colt DCS’ reputation in the marketplace and its commitment to sustainable growth and profitability.”

Crowther’s role as CFO will focus on several key areas, including driving financial performance by focusing on project returns and profitability; improving governance so that Colt DCS maintains strong controls but also structuring them to be a business enabler; and evolving the finance function as the business grows so that it remains fully integrated and supports other key functions within Colt DCS.

Crowther’s role will also include helping Colt DCS measure the ESG investments the company is currently undertaking on its journey towards net zero emissions by 2030.

“Our business has grown exponentially over the past 5-6 years where we have seen Colt DCS become a strong contender in the hyperscale data center space. David and the plethora of experience he brings considering of his experience are a testament to the caliber of talent that our business attracts,” said Niclas Sanfridsson, CEO of Colt DCS. “Crowther will be integral to delivering on our ambitious expansion plans and positioning the company as the center operator most reliable, durable and customer-centric hyperscale data platform in the industry.”

About Colt DCS

Colt Data Center Services provides true service and operational excellence in the sustainable design, construction, delivery and operational management of hyperscale data centers across Europe and APAC. We provide data center solutions to hyperscale and large enterprise customers in 14 state-of-the-art, carrier-neutral data centers across 8 cities.

Our Hyperscale and colocation solutions give our customers the freedom to plan their business growth efficiently, knowing that their data center strategy is ready for the demands of tomorrow.

We have over 25 years of industry experience, delivering on our vision to be the most reliable, customer-centric data center operator on the market. We put environmental awareness at the heart of everything we do because we know it’s the right thing to do for our planet. That’s why we are committed to reducing our environmental impact globally and making sustainability a key strategic driver. As part of our sustainability journey, alongside our sister company, we are committed to achieving net zero global emissions for our own operations by 2030.

https://www.coltdatacentres.net/

SOURCE Colt Data Center Services (Colt DCS)

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Digital exhibition reveals buried secrets from Roman times unearthed by Duke archaeologists https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/24/digital-exhibition-reveals-buried-secrets-from-roman-times-unearthed-by-duke-archaeologists/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:21:49 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/24/digital-exhibition-reveals-buried-secrets-from-roman-times-unearthed-by-duke-archaeologists/ This summer, a museum in Italy is exhibiting the results of a six-year archaeological dig conducted by more than 20 Duke faculty and students. The exhibit, which opened recently at La Sapienza University’s Museo delle Antichita Etrusche e Italiche in Rome, features finds from Vulci, an Etruscan-Roman archaeological site in Viterbo, Italy. The summer project, […]]]>

This summer, a museum in Italy is exhibiting the results of a six-year archaeological dig conducted by more than 20 Duke faculty and students.

The exhibit, which opened recently at La Sapienza University’s Museo delle Antichita Etrusche e Italiche in Rome, features finds from Vulci, an Etruscan-Roman archaeological site in Viterbo, Italy.

The summer project, a partnership with researchers from Sapienza University, draws heavily on virtual reality and digital toolsand the exhibit includes interactive installations, including two virtual reality exhibits that replicate actual archaeological digs.

The annual summer project is overseen by Maurizio Forte, Duke Professor of Classics and Art Studies, Art History, and Visual Studies. Here, Forte talks to Duke Today about the project.

What exactly do the digital installations show? Are they interactive?

STRONG: In the exhibition, there are four digital installations: Three installations are interactive; two virtual reality installations reproducing the archaeological excavations and an AR (augmented reality) installation dedicated to the visualization of Etruscan and Roman artifacts. However, the most innovative installation is a 3D impression of the archaeological landscape where it is possible to project several historical and digital maps of the site on video.

The 3D impression was produced by high-resolution digital terrain models of the landscape made by multispectral drones and LIDAR. This is the first experience of its kind in archaeology. The technological collaboration with the American Sensefly, which supplied the multispectral drones, made this achievement a success. The AR installation is a Z-Space workstation. In this case, it is possible to manipulate 3D artifacts with a 3D stylus and tracking-VR glasses.

What have you been able to discover that would not have been possible without the technology you use?

STRONG: Only a small part of the archaeological site of Vulci has been excavated. It is estimated that only 5% of the archaeological remains are visible to the public. The rest of the city has been revealed mainly by geophysical surveys, LIDAR and multispectral flights by drone technology. In short, without remote sensing technologies we would have minimal knowledge of the entire site.

In particular, two Duke PhD students in Classical Studies and Visual Studies, Antonio LoPiano and Katie McCusker (now Dr. McCusker) helped create an all-new digital map of the site, in 2D and 3D, also available in GIS and virtual reality. All this scientific data will also be available in a manageable format for the general public, so that visitors to the park will discover the hidden city of Vulci (still in the basement) in different forms of visualization.

How has the digital installation of VR/AR applications changed and challenged the field of archaeology? ? And what is meant by traditional excavation?

STRONG: VR/AR are important tools because they are considered metamedia information in archaeology: they go beyond traditional media and they have a different cognitive impact in the human brain. This is particularly important in the communication process. We have reconstructed in VR all the excavation phases, so we can simulate the entire archaeological excavation from the beginning at scale and through immersive systems. Traditional (and past) excavations suffered from a lack of precise documentation, especially in three dimensions.

How has this excavation changed you as an archaeologist and how do you view this excavation?

STRONG: This excavation changed my research perspectives in classical urban archeology – 1,500 years of urban occupation of the same site with an incredible density of buildings, infrastructures, ritual and public activities. I started to rethink the definition of the city in the pre-Roman and Roman colonial world, its formation process and its cultural identity

How have excavations further shed light on the history of Vulci?

STRONG: The Duke excavation, started in 2016, was the first to dig stratigraphically and with new methods of investigation the urban area of ​​the site. Through this approach, we discovered a series of important Roman public buildings overlapping with earlier Etruscan infrastructures. In particular, we are still studying a very complex network of canals, canals, cunicules and hydraulic infrastructures from the Etruscan period to the Roman period.

Additionally, we reconstruct a highly articulated urban historical sequence from the 6th BCE to the 5th CE. Interestingly, the same area was intended for ritual activities in Etruscan and Roman times.

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UM Stephens College of Business Computer Science Program Changes Its Name to Data Analytics https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/22/um-stephens-college-of-business-computer-science-program-changes-its-name-to-data-analytics/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:00:28 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/22/um-stephens-college-of-business-computer-science-program-changes-its-name-to-data-analytics/ Stephens College of Business at the University of Montevallo has changed the name of its computer science program to data analytics program. Dr Amiee Mellon, acting dean of Stephens College of Business, said the change was made to more accurately reflect the program’s curriculum. Dr. Milad Jasemi, assistant professor of data analytics, and Dr. Shafqat […]]]>

Stephens College of Business at the University of Montevallo has changed the name of its computer science program to data analytics program.

Dr Amiee Mellon, acting dean of Stephens College of Business, said the change was made to more accurately reflect the program’s curriculum.

Dr. Milad Jasemi, assistant professor of data analytics, and Dr. Shafqat Ali Shad, assistant professor of data analytics and cybersecurity, said the name computer science informatics does not give students an accurate idea of ​​what what is the program.

“With computing, the word itself is too complex for people to understand,” Shad said. “So the main purpose of changing that is to help them understand what the major is all about.”

“The computer science major offers something similar in a data science program, which is more in-depth computer science. When people hear about IT, this is often what they think of. What we offer is data analytics, which is different in that it involves solving business problems using cutting-edge technology and tools in today’s market. It’s more business-centric.

Other than the name of the program, nothing else will change. The program will remain the same high quality program it has always been.

“Data analytics helps the grassroots liberal arts culture at Montevallo, where entry-level courses can be taken by a diverse community of students, regardless of major and background,” Shad said.

Mellon said the data analytics program seeks students with a problem-solving mindset who want to use “big data” strategically to solve business problems.

Possible career paths in this field include data analyst, data engineer, machine learning engineer, business intelligence, and data strategist. According to Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Learn about Stephens College of Business at https://www.montevallo.edu/academics/colleges/college-of-business/.

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Influential art dealer Lia Rumma donates povera art treasure to Italy – ARTnews.com https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/20/influential-art-dealer-lia-rumma-donates-povera-art-treasure-to-italy-artnews-com/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 21:13:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/20/influential-art-dealer-lia-rumma-donates-povera-art-treasure-to-italy-artnews-com/ Dealer Lia Rumma, who runs a gallery with spaces in Milan and Naples, has donated more than 70 works by prominent Italian artists to the country’s government. The works must be exhibited in a national museum in Naples. Many of the works included in the giveaway are by artists affiliated with Arte Povera, a movement […]]]>

Dealer Lia Rumma, who runs a gallery with spaces in Milan and Naples, has donated more than 70 works by prominent Italian artists to the country’s government. The works must be exhibited in a national museum in Naples.

Many of the works included in the giveaway are by artists affiliated with Arte Povera, a movement of the 1960s and 1970s in which artists used raw materials like dirt, rags, rocks and tape to create sculptures. They considered their work to be positioned outside the market.

Among the 30 artists represented in the gift are Vincenzo Agnetti, Giovanni Anselmo, Enrico Castellani, Luciano Fabro and Michelangelo Pistoletto, and others.

The works will be on permanent display at the Palazzina dei Principi, a building on the campus of the Capodimonte Museum, one of Italy’s leading institutions. Its collection houses works dating from the 13th century to the present day. The museum currently has around 160 works of contemporary art.

Rumma, who began as a collector while living in Salerno, began accumulating works by the artists in the early 1960s with her partner, curator Marcello Rumma. He was one of those who asked German Celant to organize “Arte Povera + Azioni Povere” in 1968, one of the first important exhibitions dedicated to the movement. After Marcello’s death in 1971, Lia opened a gallery in Naples dedicated to minimalist and conceptual art, featuring artists like Joseph Kosuth and Enrico Castellani.

In a statement, Sylvain Bellenger, director of the Capodimonte Museum, said the donation reflects a period in which “Italian art entered the contemporary world radically”.

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Art exhibit returns portraits of Winold Reiss to Blackfoot Reservation https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/19/art-exhibit-returns-portraits-of-winold-reiss-to-blackfoot-reservation/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 07:00:57 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/19/art-exhibit-returns-portraits-of-winold-reiss-to-blackfoot-reservation/ For the first time in over 60 years, the works of Winold Reiss are back on the Blackfoot Reservation, where many of them were created. Through a collaboration between the Blackfoot Nation, the Museum of the Plains Indians, the BNSF Foundation and the Glacier National Park Conservancy, an exhibition of nine of Reiss’ original pastel […]]]>


For the first time in over 60 years, the works of Winold Reiss are back on the Blackfoot Reservation, where many of them were created.

Through a collaboration between the Blackfoot Nation, the Museum of the Plains Indians, the BNSF Foundation and the Glacier National Park Conservancy, an exhibition of nine of Reiss’ original pastel portraits titled “Connections – the Blackfeet and Winold Reiss” will be on display at Browning until October 29.

“We are thrilled to bring this important exhibit to the public and the Blackfoot reservation,” said Renee Bear Medicine, curator of the Museum of the Plains Indian. “Reiss learned from and influenced inspiring Blackfeet artists past and present. The portraits are displayed alongside personal artifacts belonging to the people in the portraits, and alongside the works of those he influenced.

Son of German artist Fritz Reiss, Winold Reiss was born in 1886 and followed in his father’s footsteps by studying to be an artist before emigrating to the United States in 1913 to follow his fascination with Native Americans.

The purpose of the move was explained by the artist’s grandson, Peter Reiss, at the opening of the exhibition in Browning on May 27.

“After reading stories of the American West, my grandfather decided to come to America for the express purpose of creating a permanent living memorial of the Native culture and spiritual way of life with very accurate portraits,” said explained Peter Reiss. “He was able to do just that, but along the way he also forged lasting friendships with the people he admired so deeply.”

Winold Reiss first arrived in Browning in the winter of 1920. Moments after getting off the train, he met Turtle, an accomplished Blackfeet grizzly bear hunter who would become his lifelong friend and the subject of many of Reiss’s portraits. – one of which hangs in the exhibition.

While his subjects had many reasons to sit for portraits, one was that Reiss paid well, between 50 cents and $1 an hour—between $10 and $20 in today’s money.

Returning to the reserve in 1927, this time Reiss was commissioned by the Great Northern Railway Company to produce more portraits to help publicize the railway’s Empire Builder.

While many other artists sold their work to Great Northern during the same period, it was Reiss’ work more than any other artist that came to define their advertising campaigns.

Over the years, the GNR has used Reiss’ images on a number of promotional items, from calendars and posters to playing cards, train menus and more.

IN THE In the summer of 1931, Reiss opened an art school along the shore of Lake St. Mary near the eastern entrance to Glacier National Park. While the school was operating independently in 1931, it reopened in the summers between 1934 and 1937, sponsored by GNR.

Offering courses in drawing, painting, sculpture, muralism and design, the school was taught by Reiss, his brother Hans and fellow German-born artist Carl Link.

Students could pay to attend school and could even earn college credit through New York University, but Reiss still waived tuition for Blackfeet students.

Several notable Blackfeet artists attended the school, including Albert Racine, Isabelle McKay, Stanley Croff and Victor Pepion, whose works are also part of the exhibit.

Reiss is quoted in the exhibit for saying that the Blackfeet artists were the “most talented students I have ever had”.

The GNR ended up buying nearly 100 portraits of Reiss over the years, which are now part of the collection owned by the GNR’s modern successor, BNSF Railway.

WHEN THE GLACIERS National Park Conservancy board member Cheryle “Cookie” Cobell Zwang began dreaming of a project that would benefit both the park and her fellow Blackfeet Tribe members, Winold Reiss’s work immediately came to mind.

Her great-grandparents had both posed for portraits of Reiss and she knew many others in the area who had relatives who had done the same.

The opportunity to attract visitors to Browning and showcase the lives of those featured in Reiss’ painting was the perfect pairing Zwang was looking for.

“I thought this project could bring tourism to the reserve, but could also tell a story that couldn’t be told anywhere else,” she said. “These are such iconic images. I knew many people would recognize and appreciate them. They attract a lot of attention. »

Zwang approached fellow BNSF Railway Foundation board member and chairman Zak Anderson about the project and soon the ballooning began.

“An idea is a very small thing unless you can get people to buy into it and make it happen. It seemed like it was an idea that anyone could adopt,” Zwang said.

At the end of May, Zwang’s idea became a reality.

“Making these paintings available to the public here at Browning and at the Plains Indian Museum is really important,” said Glacier Conservancy Executive Director Doug Mitchell. “This is a wonderful opportunity for all of us to explore Glacier’s complicated and sometimes charged history, and to do so through the lens of the park’s first inhabitants whose living relatives give voice to the real-life stories of the people in Reiss’ work.

Zwang had grown up hearing stories about her great-grandparents and had seen reproductions of their portraits produced by Reiss, but the exhibition at Browning was the first time she had seen the original pastels as well as the objects the museum could exhibit with them. , which included some of her great-grandmother’s beadwork and her original police uniform. Her great-grandmother, Julia Wades in the Water, was the first Native American woman to serve as a police officer.

“I knew my great-grandmother was a fabulous craftswoman, but seeing her work in person was truly amazing. It was an amazing experience and everyone who visits the museum experiences it as well,” Zwang said. “The objective of the exhibit is to bring to life the characters in the portraits as well as the Blackfoot who studied with Reiss.”

“Reiss had such a connection to the people and the land,” Zwang added. “My greatest hope is that this exhibition will allow many people to discover the museum and all that it has to offer. I hope people will appreciate the work of Winold Reiss for the amazing art that it is and also for the amazing people in these portraits.

Located at 19 Museum Loop in Browning, the Museum of the Plains Indian is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Journalist Jeremy Weber can be reached at 406-758-4446 or jweber@dailyinterlake.com.

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Laura Kugel: “We have preserved objects, unpublished discoveries” https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/17/laura-kugel-we-have-preserved-objects-unpublished-discoveries/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 04:00:26 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/17/laura-kugel-we-have-preserved-objects-unpublished-discoveries/ Before speaking, Laura Kugel e-mails me a very strange and enigmatic photo. It is a proto-surrealist double bust, beautifully carved in white marble: the head and shoulders of a baby perched on the head and shoulders of a curly-haired young Greek. What is that ? “A strong theory is that it would be displayed at […]]]>

Before speaking, Laura Kugel e-mails me a very strange and enigmatic photo. It is a proto-surrealist double bust, beautifully carved in white marble: the head and shoulders of a baby perched on the head and shoulders of a curly-haired young Greek. What is that ?

“A strong theory is that it would be displayed at the entrance to the artist’s studio as a spectacle item – or perhaps a show-off. When we saw it, we all said to ourselves that we just had to acquire it, even if it is a little outside our usual period.

Out of time, late 19th century: the Kugel Gallery, a family business of which Laura is a part, specializes in works from Antiquity to the beginning of the 19th century. But that’s typical, she says, of their approach and range: the best quality and most unique pieces are the hallmark. “It exemplifies the strengths of our organization: we can only buy what we like – it can be for many reasons, a fascinating provenance, something entertaining or something unusual, unexpected.”

Laura Kugel, representing the sixth generation, joined the gallery in 2015 © Hasselblad H3D

A 19th century double bust, in white marble, by the Italian artist Meli

I ask her the question that you always have to ask her and that you have to get tired of answering: has she always had the goal of joining the family gallery? The reason this is a more or less unavoidable question is that Laura is the sixth generation of this most famous and esteemed neighborhood in Paris. antiques. A treasure by appointment at the Hôtel Collot on the left bank of Paris, it is known for its museum-quality works, from Renaissance portraits to clocks, from enamel and silver to tapestries, from fine Egyptian statuary furniture, with art of every kind imaginable. And the family tradition dates back to the beginning of the 19th century in Russia.

“No,” she said with a laugh, “I guess that surprised me a bit.” She studied social science and politics in London rather than art history, and it wasn’t until she started accompanying her father and uncle, Nicolas and Alexis, on shopping trips. or expertise, “by following them and observing them, and starting to learn about fantastic objects, it became clear that this was the way for me. She joined the gallery in 2015.

And with such a history, was it intended to bring an innovative style to the long-established company? She laughs. “Of course when I arrived I had what I thought were 100 brilliant ideas, but I soon realized my dad and uncle had been doing this since they were very young and extremely good at what they’re doing. So the change is very organic, we’re working extremely cooperatively and changes are sort of happening. It’s a gradual opening up, mostly digital.

The Kugel Gallery exhibits works in the historic salons of the Hôtel Collot in Paris © JEROME GALLAND

However, there are innovations. Galerie Kugel only exhibits at Tefaf Maastricht, but has been organizing special showcase exhibitions for some years now – for a wider “creative carte blanche”, as Kugel puts it. The most recent, titled The creators of tasteexplored the role of the powerful mercers, merchants who shaped the luxury market in France in the 18th century. It was held in New York at the brand new Villa Albertine, an institution that plays the role of ambassador of French culture in the United States. “It was important to show our American customers that we are back,” she says.

Such showcase exhibitions require a lot of work, research, discovery. “There are really two parts,” says Kugel. “One to get the idea, then you have to collect the objects. We sometimes work on these projects for five to ten years. We are very proud of it. »

Will there be something similar at Tefaf Maastricht? “Obviously we’re generalists with a broad spectrum,” she replies, “so we try to show that range — in an 80 square foot booth, it’s not easy! We are therefore not presenting a theme and we are not planning anything extravagant in terms of presentations. We try to bring in a large volume of work; we just aim to bring the best we can. And after a two-year break, the works on display will probably be spectacular: “We have preserved objects, unpublished discoveries that we have made and that we have preserved,” she says.

Kugel has a dual role at Tefaf: in addition to being a prominent exhibitor, she is a member of the board of directors. Unlike other art fairs, Tefaf is a foundation rather than a company. “It is overseen by a board of directors, a mix of dealers, art collectors and others, people who have skin in the game. I joined the board two years ago . This year in Maastricht will therefore be the first time that I will have the opportunity to meet all these colleagues.

The large rooms contain a range of works ranging from enamel and silver to tapestries. . . © Jerome Galland

. . . and a library containing thousands of volumes © Jérôme Galland

Tefaf, like other salons, had to decide whether to shut down completely or run an online version during the pandemic years. “We had to invest quickly in new initiatives, but I think we all agree that they are second to none in terms of access and reach. Collectively, across the profession, I think we’ve made tremendous progress, so there’s a positive side to all of this. We come back stronger and we learned that there is a very large audience of people who care about what we do.

“Tefaf is the exhibition of works of art: this is where we see visitors who have the curiosity to come see us, and say to us: what can you show us? What’s special?

Beyond the fair, have the pandemic years changed the business model of the gallery itself? “Absolutely,” Kugel replies. “The way of doing business of the past decades no longer really prevails and the field of possibilities has expanded incredibly. This is one of the positive points of the last two years. Now we’re pushing to be more visible, whether that’s in the form of events and presentations, or a stronger online presence, so we’re experimenting a bit with what works and what doesn’t.

The current special exhibition at the Kugel gallery is a selection from the legendary collection of the late Hubert de Givenchy, aristocrat and couturier, described as “one of the most illustrious representatives of the great taste”. His collection was extensive, Kugel points out, but this exhibition shows his passion for 18th-century French furniture: other pieces from the collection have arrived at Christie’s Paris — this week’s sale broke records, with a total reaching nearly of 83 million euros. Such extraordinary collections from the past pass through the hands of the Kugels, but does she think the future will still see such treasures, or does the global range of patrons mean dispersal is inevitable?

“Auction houses can only scatter a collection, they can only fragment it, lot by lot. One thing we’ve done is sell items in groups; it is something for which we have developed a specialty. So when Hubert de Givenchy gave us his collection of enamels for sale, in 1994, it left as a piece in Yves Saint Laurent’s collection.

The gallery specializes in works from Antiquity to the early 19th century © Jérôme Galland

Beyond the sale of inventory, customer requests can be even more specialized. Saint Laurent, it is reported, once sent the Kugels a photograph of patron Marie-Laure de Noailles, beautifully dressed, seated beside a table covered with art – and asked them to reproduce it for him. Kugel herself does not mention this story, but she says, “We have customers who come to us asking for a Kunstkammerfilled with artwork of one kind or another – and we are able to provide that.

The gallery prides itself on careful research and discovery, and the expertise to meet such demands – there is a library of thousands of volumes, a publishing program to accompany the exhibitions, and Alexis and Nicolas Kugel are the authors of numerous scientific works. publications in the museum world. “It’s nice that the mercantile aspects can partner with the big institutions – it’s a hugely rewarding part of the job.”

The fashion for the ‘horizontal’ collection – across genres and eras – is something that the style and range of Galerie Kugel certainly encourages. “Trends come and go,” she says, “right now, artwork is very strong. We work a lot with eclectic collectors who may come to us for furniture but are drawn to other things, especially fine craftsmanship.

And what about his personal tastes? “I spent my formative years, especially with my father, going to museums with the great princely treasures – in Florence, in Vienna – and seeing incredible objects that are just awe-inspiring. he artist was able to chisel silver in this way, or transform ivory in this way. Personally, that is what moves me the most, when confronted with such a homogeneous skill. It is like a small world that lies in your hand. So works of art are my favorite department – works that have no other reason for being than to be amazing.

gallerykugel.com

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Odia Culture Shots in Chennai – The New Indian Express https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/12/odia-culture-shots-in-chennai-the-new-indian-express/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 22:03:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/12/odia-culture-shots-in-chennai-the-new-indian-express/ Express press service The entwined serpents are red and gold, looking tall and proud like Rani Padmini. Agnihotri, the golden sheep with powerful gaze, welcomed everyone to the unknown lands of excavation sites. Surya Putri, the horse, reflected the colors of a bright sun and a black moon with different patterns engraved on its body. […]]]>

Express press service

The entwined serpents are red and gold, looking tall and proud like Rani Padmini. Agnihotri, the golden sheep with powerful gaze, welcomed everyone to the unknown lands of excavation sites. Surya Putri, the horse, reflected the colors of a bright sun and a black moon with different patterns engraved on its body.

Each painting had a story to tell, a land of mystery to discover and a message to draw from it. Zooming in on Helen Brahma’s paintings at the ‘Guardian Spirits’ exhibition held at Cholamandal artists’ village on Saturday, art lovers kept talking about how Helen merged myth and reality, with solid historical and cultural research.

His series of artworks features animals dressed in Sambalpuri ikat cloth, the traditional woven textile of Odisha. “Helen is bringing Odisha to Chennai,” said Gopinath P, founder and member of Cholamandal Artists’ Village.

Addl DGP (Tamil Nadu Police) Amaraesh Pujari, the main guest. at the event, “Helen created a huge world of priceless artwork.”

Beginning her artistic career depicting still lifes and nature studies, the artist had her breakthrough when she met art historian Elinor Gadon, who was researching the temples of Odisha.

“I saw my local environment with a new perspective after accompanying her on tours of historical places around Odisha. My interest was piqued by the reverence for women expressed in the worship of the goddess. At the same time “, as a young artist entering motherhood, I was intrigued by the disparity between religious and real representations of women. This served as a starting point for my iconography, which crossed the divine and the human”, has said Helen.

Her interest in textile painting came from the idea of ​​creating something related to women that has eternal life. “I painted on sarees using sindoor, haldi, bindi etc. After a while I felt that the soul of the saree broke when not worn for a while. long time. I wanted to create something that could be kept for a long time with a deep message. So I thought of painting textile on a canvas,” shared Helen.

The many animal and bird pieces that accompany the yoginis are presented as iconic images with their own existence in his art. “Yogini temples in India are roofless shrines to female masters of yoga in Hindu Tantra, who are sometimes identified as deities, who embody divine feminine power,” Helen explained.

She also uses vahana, the icons she has painted, to share her views on gender parity – just as the male vahana supports and protects the Yogini, men should ideally use their strength to nurture rather than dominate the women. H

History is explored in Helen’s work, with its cycle of making and breaking down. While trying to understand the story and the work behind each piece, we realize that the artist is trying to visually solve a problem that has not yet been solved in reality outside of his painting.

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rettberg: Modern art by KK Hebbar, Ambadas Khobragade at auction from the collection of German gallerist Ute Rettberg https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/11/rettberg-modern-art-by-kk-hebbar-ambadas-khobragade-at-auction-from-the-collection-of-german-gallerist-ute-rettberg/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 06:10:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/11/rettberg-modern-art-by-kk-hebbar-ambadas-khobragade-at-auction-from-the-collection-of-german-gallerist-ute-rettberg/ “I was so convinced of the value of Indian art and that it is equal to all others and that someone had to show it,” says Ute Rettberg, the pioneering German gallery owner who played an important role in the expansion of the Indian art market abroad. . Sotheby’s London has launched an online auction […]]]>
“I was so convinced of the value of Indian art and that it is equal to all others and that someone had to show it,” says Ute Rettberg, the pioneering German gallery owner who played an important role in the expansion of the Indian art market abroad. . Sotheby’s London has launched an online auction of more than 80 works from Rettberg’s personal collection, ‘The Surya Collection: Property from Mrs. Ute Rettberg’ includes paintings, drawings, prints and sculptures which Rettberg signed surrounds for nearly 50 years.

The sale features works by important figures in the field of modern Indian art whom Rettberg also considered friends, with pieces by KK Hebbar and Ambadas Khobragade – considered a true pioneer of color and form – among the strong points. As well as showcasing established Indian artists, the auction offers an exciting opportunity to discover little-seen and rare works, carefully curated by Rettberg’s keen eye and expertise.

Ute Rettberg lived in Mumbai in the mid-1960s where she worked as one of the first women in the German diplomatic service. She and her husband were newlyweds, drawn to the vibrant colors of contemporary Indian art, and began buying works by talented young artists to decorate their Juhu Beach residence.

“Since I lived and worked in India – I came to India in 1964 and got married in 1966, and we started decorating our house. Everyone was buying antiques but I felt a bit too young and thought it was better to support living artists who have to make a living. When we came back to Germany and decorated our new house here, everyone said, wow, what colorful paintings, and asked me to bring some when I went to India,” she told ET.

Agencies

January ’78, Biren De, 1978

In the early 1970s, Kekoo Gandhy (founder of the Chemould Gallery in Mumbai) began sending works by Ute to be exhibited at her new Surya Galerie, based in Freinsheim near Frankfurt. Reviewing photographs taken with artists at the time, Ute recalls, “Sometimes I marvel at how young I looked, that I dared to do all this. But I was so convinced of the value and that Indian art is equal to all others and someone had to show it.

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Rettberg went on to form close and lasting friendships with Indian artists such as KK Hebbar, Satish Panchal and Surya Prakash, many of whom would stay with her in Germany for months and exhibit their works at Surya Gallery. Rettberg credits Hebbar for the refinement of his tastes: “We met Krishna K. Hebbar, who in many meetings and discussions over the years sharpened my eye and my sense of quality, good craftsmanship and authentic forms of expression.”

Hebbar’s artwork Untitled, (Versova Beach) is one of Ute’s favorites, and today she remembers him drawing it at the beach, where people were drying fish and where his wife picked up fenugreek, on an invitation card he had with him.

“Some people thought it was out of the ordinary but for the most part the reception was very good. The press was interested, people thought oh, wonderful, something colorful and exciting in this dull landscape Everyone was excited and so the gallery continued, and was still packed, people came from all over Germany, even from France.

From mezzoprints to wall hangings and neo-tantric art, the selection of works offered in this extraordinary sole proprietor sale form a time capsule of a unique period in modern Indian art and testify to Ms. Ute Rettberg.

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Salisbury town planning plaque on bench to honor memory of street artist https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/09/salisbury-town-planning-plaque-on-bench-to-honor-memory-of-street-artist/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/09/salisbury-town-planning-plaque-on-bench-to-honor-memory-of-street-artist/ SALISBURY, NC (WBTV) — Joseph Heilig spent hours each day on a bench outside Fuller’s Market in downtown Salisbury, working on his art and engaging in conversations. His presence and personality left a lasting mark on many who came into contact with him. Now an effort has begun to honor Heilig’s memory with a plaque […]]]>

SALISBURY, NC (WBTV) — Joseph Heilig spent hours each day on a bench outside Fuller’s Market in downtown Salisbury, working on his art and engaging in conversations. His presence and personality left a lasting mark on many who came into contact with him. Now an effort has begun to honor Heilig’s memory with a plaque that would be placed on the bench.

Heilig died suddenly last month of medical issues.

The Monday following his death, flowers were placed on this bench and a hand-painted sign with angel wings bore the message “RIP Joe”.

“I am overwhelmed with a level of sadness that I would not have anticipated because Joe was so much a part of my experience as a shop owner in downtown Salisbury,” said Alissa Redmond of South Main Book Company. . “He was the face of Main Street, so and you don’t have people like that in every generation…he was that person for us.”

At Salisbury City Council meeting this week, Tamara Sheffield said the request had been made to begin the process of placing a plaque on the bench.

The council then established a 30-day public comment period before placing the plaque. Comments can be submitted to Salisbury Town Clerk Kelly Baker at kbake@salisburync.gov.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

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Film Academy appoints Bill Kramer as new CEO after handing him over to Movie Museum https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/07/film-academy-appoints-bill-kramer-as-new-ceo-after-handing-him-over-to-movie-museum/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 21:46:53 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/06/07/film-academy-appoints-bill-kramer-as-new-ceo-after-handing-him-over-to-movie-museum/ Image via AMPA The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted to appoint Bill Kramer as the new CEO of the organization following the departure of Dawn Hudson after 11 years of service. The news was first reported this week by the pinner, who noted that in his current […]]]>

Image via AMPA

The Board of Governors of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voted to appoint Bill Kramer as the new CEO of the organization following the departure of Dawn Hudson after 11 years of service.

The news was first reported this week by the pinner, who noted that in his current role as director and president of the Academy Museum, Kramer was responsible for the omission of many Jews who helped build Hollywood at the time. This was of course treated as an innocent oversight, but it nonetheless remained troubling to many high-powered industry players, even though the board was clearly encouraged by the steps it took to rectify this mistake. Although the museum was well over budget, it had a successful launch last September and in its first nine months of operation over 550,000 tickets were sold – an impressive achievement, no doubt.

Kramer will assume his new role on July 18, while Hudson will remain at the Academy as an advisor during the transition period. The appointment of a new Director of the Academy Museum is currently being discussed by the Museum’s Board of Trustees and the Academy’s Foundation Board, and this announcement will be made in the near future.

As the Academy’s new CEO, Kramer will lead global membership, the Academy Awards, the institution’s education and emerging talent initiatives, the Academy’s extensive collections housed in the Margaret Herrick Library and the Academy’s film archives, as well as the Academy Museum and its schedule of current exhibitions, screenings, educational and public programs, and all retail operations.

Academy Museum

Image via Academy Museum/Eric Green

The Academy Museum consists of five floors of world-class exhibits dedicated to the arts and sciences of cinema, as well as a permanent retail store which, combined with online sales, has generated more than 5.5 million dollars to date. Under Kramer’s leadership, the museum created the Academy’s first global publication imprint which was launched with a Hayao Miyazaki catalogue, which is currently in its fourth printing, with a Spike Lee book to be published later this month. Kramer and the museum’s programming team also developed the Academy’s first series of robust public screenings with more than 40 programs presented each month, including Branch selectsa series of screenings co-created with the 17 member branches of the Academy.

To ensure the museum’s financial health, Kramer oversaw the completion of the $388 million capital campaign that launched the museum project and established an ongoing $40 million annual operating revenue program that includes an annual gala, ticket sales, museum membership, etc.

“Bill Kramer was a transformational leader in creating the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures as a beacon for moviegoers and a manifestation of all that the Academy stands for and celebrates. His vision for the future of the Academy is also bold and inspiring, and our governors agreed he was the perfect choice to lead at this pivotal time for the organization. We believe Bill has the ability to bring together all corners of the film community, and we are delighted to having him in this role to elevate the organization and unite our global members,” the Academy President said. david rubin said in a statement.

“I cannot overstate the deep respect and appreciation we have for the groundbreaking accomplishments that Dawn Hudson has brought to the Academy during her eleven years as CEO. She has launched unprecedented efforts to create more space for diverse voices, both within the membership and within our industry. She tirelessly led our long-awaited museum through to its opening and strengthened the financial stability of the Academy, enabling us to develop programs and to provide mentorship to those in front of and behind the camera. Our gratitude for his accomplishments and guidance is immeasurable,” added Rubin.

“What a privilege it has been to work with an exceptionally talented staff and dedicated board members to create a truly global institution, a world-class museum that honors this art form so beautifully, an ongoing commitment to the representation and inclusion, and a modern organization ready to lead in a changing world,” Hudson said in a statement. “I have worked with Bill for nearly a decade, and no leader is more innovative, more connected to artists or more passionate about the opportunities before us than he.The Academy and the Academy Museum are in good hands.

Chris Rock

Picture via ABC

“The Academy Museum Board is delighted that Bill will continue his work with us as CEO of the Academy and as Trustee of the Museum Board,” the co-CEO added. from Netflix. Ted Sarandos, who is also Chairman of the Board of the Academy Museum. “The opening of the museum was a resounding success, and I look forward to working with Bill to help further amplify the museum’s robust programs and create a unifying and strategic vision for the future.”

“It is the greatest honor of my career to take on the role of CEO of the Academy,” said Kramer. “I deeply believe in the power and the art of cinema. I so look forward to galvanizing the Academy’s unrivaled assets – the Oscars, our global community of more than 10,000 Academy members, and our museum, library and archives – to promote and elevate the arts and film science and inspire the next generation of filmmakers. I am deeply grateful for this opportunity and for the incredible work of my colleagues Brendan Connell, Jr. and Jacqueline Stewartwhich will continue the exceptional work of the Musée de l’Académie.

During his previous tenure as General Manager of the Academy Museum, Kramer served as Head of Planning, Public Relations, Advancement, Exhibits and Government Relations for the pre-construction phase. of the museum, successfully leading the project’s fundraising campaign and managing the project’s public approvals. treat. Kramer also oversaw the production of the museum’s first exhibit, Hollywood costumewhich explored the central role costume design plays in cinematic storytelling and featured over 100 iconic film costumes.

Prior to returning to the Academy Museum in 2019, Kramer served as Vice President of Development at the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), one of America’s most institutionally and programmatically diverse arts institutions, where he led a team of 45 people responsible for raising significant funds. private and government funding, overseeing a visual arts expansion program and providing the platform for BAM’s growing film program to international audiences.

Kramer has led fundraising and comprehensive campaigns for the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) and the California Institute of the Arts (CalArts) and has held executive positions in business and fundraising at Sundance Institute, Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), and Columbia University School of the Arts.

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