Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Fri, 30 Apr 2021 05:14:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.1 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 Art Deco is the fun focus of this photo challenge – NBC Los Angeles https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/art-deco-is-the-fun-focus-of-this-photo-challenge-nbc-los-angeles/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/art-deco-is-the-fun-focus-of-this-photo-challenge-nbc-los-angeles/#respond Fri, 30 Apr 2021 04:30:02 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/art-deco-is-the-fun-focus-of-this-photo-challenge-nbc-los-angeles/ What there is to know The Art Deco Society of Los Angeles is hosting a social media sharing event throughout May Fans urged to post more quirky pics in local art deco A free Zoom talk on May 2 will help inspire photographers and discuss what to look for on the go. There won’t be […]]]>


What there is to know

  • The Art Deco Society of Los Angeles is hosting a social media sharing event throughout May
  • Fans urged to post more quirky pics in local art deco
  • A free Zoom talk on May 2 will help inspire photographers and discuss what to look for on the go.

There won’t be too many disagreements about Los Angeles to be a big city, nor will the claim that some of the tallest buildings in this big city all come from a particular era, which means they have a some common verve.

This time period tony?

We are approaching its centenary, in just a few years, as the structures we cite all grew (and increased and increased) around our region in the late 1920s and early 1930s.

It’s the 100th anniversary of art deco as we move forward, of course, and just look to the Griffith Observatory, the Wiltern or the Eastern Columbia Building, along with hundreds of other notable addresses, for know that this elegant style always exerts a strong and streamlined influence on the architectural imagination of our city.

To celebrate our megalopolis and its deco-tastic character, the Art Deco Society of Los Angeles will be celebrating art deco throughout the month of May, with a take part from your home.

Well, not exactly ‘from home’, but home decor enthusiasts are welcome to snap photos of some of their favorite adornments, details, doors, stairs, etc. and then share those photos on social media with a multitude. of tags, including #ShowUsYourArtDeco.

It’s all part of an initiative called the 31 Days of Deco.

But here’s a twist: While you may have a dozen photos of Wiltern on your phone, the decor-loving company is looking for something a little different.

“We all know the great movie palaces and skyscrapers, but our goal is to find amazing specimens that think outside the box,” shared a post on the ADSLA website. “Maybe even a building worthy of being our next candidate for a nomination for historic cultural monuments!”

Call it a invite to hang out in May and in your neighborhood (or beyond), with a little mystery to solve: What are the art deco gems in your area, or areas you frequent, that might require a bit of attention. love and care?

To help you start this event at your own pace, share what you like, there is a free Zoom event on Sunday May 2nd.

It’s called “A Toast to LA Art Deco Architecture,” and it will include tips on documenting decor finds in a zazzy way, what to look for, and, yes, a cocktail-making component.

May is Preservation Month, and the Art Deco Society of Los Angeles is asking residents to eventually help preserve the little gems they adore, ones that don’t always make the cover of the magazine but definitely should be known and admired by a wider audience.

For more details on both the May 2 event (you’ll want to register, rate), as well as the May social media photo sharing event, go easy, uh, online for this packed info page now.



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Kenny Leon-Helmed Reading of Samm-Art Williams’s Home Streams April 30 https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/kenny-leon-helmed-reading-of-samm-art-williamss-home-streams-april-30/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/kenny-leon-helmed-reading-of-samm-art-williamss-home-streams-april-30/#respond Fri, 30 Apr 2021 04:03:23 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/kenny-leon-helmed-reading-of-samm-art-williamss-home-streams-april-30/ Samm-Art Williams’ Home receives a virtual reading, led by Tony winner Kenny Leon, on April 30. Rob Demery (A soldier’s game), current candidate Tony Joaquina Kalukango (Slave game), Brittany Inge (Boomerang) and Christina Sajous (Sponge Bob SquarePants). The feed will be available until May 3 at RoundaboutTheatre.org/Refocus. Joaquina Kalukango Joseph Marzullo / WENN Home serves […]]]>


Samm-Art Williams’ Home receives a virtual reading, led by Tony winner Kenny Leon, on April 30. Rob Demery (A soldier’s game), current candidate Tony Joaquina Kalukango (Slave game), Brittany Inge (Boomerang) and Christina Sajous (Sponge Bob SquarePants). The feed will be available until May 3 at RoundaboutTheatre.org/Refocus.

Joaquina Kalukango

Joseph Marzullo / WENN


Home serves as the launch of the Roundabout Theater Company’s Refocus Project, announced last month. A programmed reading by Angelina Weld Grimké Rachel which was originally intended to serve as the launch of the series on April 23 has been postponed to May 4. Virtual readings of I have to home by Shirley Graham Du Bois, Notch by Zora Neale Hurston, and Wine in the desert by Alice Childress should follow.

The project aims to bring to light marginalized plays and restore them to American canon. Home premiered in 1979 at the St. Marks Playhouse in a Negro Ensemble Company production, later transferred to Broadway and earning Williams a 1980 Tony Award nomination for Best Play.

Each reading in the series will be accompanied by a free online resource library with materials to help and encourage future productions of rarely seen works. The project also includes community and educational events and a literary ancestry essay series curated by Roundabout Tow Foundation playwright in residence Davie Harris.

Home is free to watch with the inscription. You can find the feed and learn more about the Refocus project at RoundaboutTheatre.org/Refocus.



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Classic examples of Hoysala’s excellence in sculpture https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/classic-examples-of-hoysalas-excellence-in-sculpture/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/classic-examples-of-hoysalas-excellence-in-sculpture/#respond Fri, 30 Apr 2021 00:30:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/classic-examples-of-hoysalas-excellence-in-sculpture/ THE Siva temple in Halebidu and its twin Vaishnavite dedicated to Chennakeshava in Belur, both in the Hassan district of Karnataka, together feature an astonishing pantheon of filigree Hindu deities intricately carved in stone. The extraordinary attention to detail and intricate magic worked by the chisel transformed a stubborn and demanding medium as stone into […]]]>


THE Siva temple in Halebidu and its twin Vaishnavite dedicated to Chennakeshava in Belur, both in the Hassan district of Karnataka, together feature an astonishing pantheon of filigree Hindu deities intricately carved in stone. The extraordinary attention to detail and intricate magic worked by the chisel transformed a stubborn and demanding medium as stone into a charming open-air art museum. Built nearly a thousand years ago, the structures are an eloquent testimony to the refined aesthetic sensibilities of the Hoysala era. Despite the damage inflicted by the armies of Malik Kafur, the regional general of the Delhi Sultanate in the 14th century, many of these sculptures have survived and have remained almost intact today. In fact, Belur Temple, located about 200 kilometers from Bengaluru, has been a living temple with daily prayers offered to the presiding deity continuously for nearly 900 years.

Halebidu, which was called Dwarasamudra, was once the capital of the Hoysala Empire which dominated most of Karnataka and even parts of present-day Tamil Nadu. It was abandoned in the 14th century when it was sacked for the second time by Malik Kafur, and hence the name Halebidu meaning “old encampment”. Daily worship was reestablished at the Halebidu Hoysaleswara Temple in the early 20th century, although it attracts art historians, architecture enthusiasts and tourists more than pilgrims.

Halebidu temple

The Hoysalas were feudatories of the Chalukyas who ruled from Kalyani (now Basavakalyan in Bidar district) in northern Karnataka. The Hoysalas dominated much of the Deccan from the 11th century. When King Hoysala Vishnuvardhana ascended to the throne in 1108, the kingdom moved away from Chalukyan influence and asserted its independence with happy consequences for the world of art, architecture, sculpture and culture. . The construction of the Halebidu Temple, a classic example of Hoysala’s excellence in sculpture, was built around 1121 CE, with the patronage of Ketamalla Setti, a merchant of the kingdom. Additions were made during the reign of Narasimhavardhana, son of Vishnuvardhana. This style of architecture and sculpture began to dominate structures built over the next 200 years throughout the Deccan. Many of these temples are in ruins today, but those that survive in and around Halebidu and Belur offer a glimpse of the Hoysalas’ penchant for excellence. They also offer valuable insight into the mores of Hoysala society.

Hoysala architecture is influenced by the Nagara style. Art historians and researchers still wonder if the style was brought in by artisans from the north. The cities of Hoysala are generally designed on a cosmic diagram with the cardinal directions forming the main axes and the temples at the central intersection of the axes. The capital itself was fortified and fortified, traces of which can still be seen today in Halebidu. The city was autonomous with a grid of streets. Stepwells and the temple reservoirs took care of the irrigation.

I visited Belur and Halebid in 2020, right after Karnataka lifted the lockdown. It was my second visit to these magnificent monuments. The generally bustling temple complex appeared abandoned; its vast emerald lawns devoid of the sound of footsteps; stalls selling souvenirs and food had been closed for lack of customers. It gave me the opportunity to feast my eyes on the amazing works of art at leisure and savor their exquisite beauty, unhindered and in peace.

I instinctively searched for the UNESCO World Heritage Site label, which has crowned many lesser monuments around the world, but was surprised to find that these exceptional structures had yet to do their brand. In fact, the UNESCO website acknowledges that art historians recognize the unusually complex sculptural art of the two temples as masterpieces of South Asian art; he even claims that they made the name Hoysala a synonym for artistic achievement. However, the two temples are only on the provisional list of heritage sites identified by UNESCO, awaiting final confirmation.

Hoysala architecture is a happy blend of the Nagara style of northern India and the Dravidian style of the south. A remarkable feature of these temples is that they were built on star-shaped platforms. The platforms themselves are adorned with friezes of mythical and contemporary creatures – yali, horses, elephants and Hans (swan) as well as processions of dancing girls and tribute bearers. The effect is that of a richly woven border of a silk garment, which embellishes and enhances the appeal of the carvings that adorn the walls of the temples themselves.

The carvings, both on the pedestal and on the main exterior structure, are intricate and rich in detail. Careful attention has been paid to the folds of the clothes, the intricacy of the adornments and the hairstyles of women that can compete with the latest fashion in the contemporary world. Vahanas, or vehicles, used by gods, such as Brahma Hans and the Garuda of Vishnu, and the serpent adorning the locks of Siva have been elaborately engraved, which makes them realistic; and battle scenes illustrate the type of weapons and armaments used in warfare during the period. The sculptures also bring everyday scenes from a bygone era to life that might otherwise have been lost to posterity.

Stone pillars

A characteristic element of Hoysala architecture is the perfectly proportioned stone pillars with circular rings. The perfection of the pillars has given rise to conjecture that they could have been turned in a lathe, although this is dismissed by historians as highly improbable, which makes them even more remarkable. The pillars appear polished like mirrors, reflecting the sun’s rays from different angles. The plinth above the platform is truly a sculptural symphony of religious and cultural iconography. Gods and goddesses, familiar scenes from Ramayana, Mahabharata and Srimad Bhagavatam, musicians and dancers, hunting scenes, games, processions, battle scenes, eroticism, nothing seems to have been too complicated or too intimidating to sculpt. Curvy gods and goddesses in graceful poses, their torn muscles visible through the folds of their richly adorned clothing, the elaborate depiction of various ornaments adorning both men and women, including the signet ring on the women’s fingers, not to mention a fly perched on a bowl of fruit, all marvel at how long the sculptors have gone to make it look realistic. The lustrous hair of the dancing women is held together by choodamani, an ornamental headdress, and the strings of musical instruments seem to pulsate, evoking unheard-of melodies. It was possible to carve such meticulous and intricate details on the chlorite-shale stone, mined from the region. These stones were soft when pulled out but hardened when exposed to air. That is why they have been kept for posterity despite the passage of time when the elements must have taken their toll on them.

The architectural plan of the temples of Hoysala met the religious, cultural and ritual requirements of the time. Halebidu has three shrines to meet ritual requirements, which involves considerable mastery of mathematical and engineering skills. The exterior walls were designed as multi-pointed stars to create additional space and allow sculptors to express their excellence. The interior – rangamandapa – is supported by four ornate pillars. The roofs are mounted with elaborately carved panels. The mandapa is spacious enough to stage dance performances and must have sounded with the sound of cymbals and anklets.

Inscriptions on the site suggest the diverse professions of donors who have contributed not only to the construction of the temples, but also to its daily upkeep, including the salaries of priests and maintenance staff. These temples are also unique in that the sculptors inscribed their signatures on the panels. On one of the panels, the name Kalidasi is described as “Champion over the proud” or as Indra of the sculptors. Dasoja and his son Chavana, who emigrated from Balligrama to the present-day district of Shivamogga, find a prominent place among the sculptors who produced this wonder. There is a large archaeological museum within the grounds of the Halebidu temple. It houses artifacts from neighboring temples of similar provenance. In fact, there are many Hoysala temples scattered throughout the region, including Jain Basadis. (King Vishnuvardhana was a follower of Jainism before converting to Vaishnavism.)

The temple of Belur

Belur, 17 km southwest of Halebidu and 35 km from the city of Hassan, was said to have been the first capital of the Hoysalas. The Chennakeshava temple complex in Belur was the center of a walled city on the banks of the Yagachi River. The construction of this temple began in 1117 CE and lasted 103 years. According to inscriptions found at the scene, it was known as Velapuri. The Hoysalas even called it the terrestrial Vaikunta or Dakshina Varanasi. The inscriptions list the names of artists and sculptors employed, grants made to the temple, and renovations undertaken. Belur Temple is dedicated to Vishnu and is also richly embellished, not only with scenes from Vishnu Purana, Ramayana, etc., but also with Saivite deities.

The gate of Chennakeshava temple, guarded by Manmatha and his wife, each flanked by a nwarapalaka, or porter, is remarkably ornate. On the lintel above the two profusely sculpted makaras is a panel representing the flying Garuda. Above the Garuda is the lion-man, or Narasimha, tearing the bowels of the demon king Hiranyakasipu. The floral and serpentine arches surrounding the panel are a stone filigree study.

Inside the Navaranga room is a pair of giant sandals presented by the shoemaker community. The holy philosopher Sri Ramanuja was instrumental in ensuring that worshipers of all castes had access to the temple premises, and the sandals commemorate this. The pillars that support the Navaranga Hall are square, octagonal, 16-sided, round, lotus-shaped, star-shaped, or fluted and all are intricately carved. The lintels feature beautifully sculpted maidens, some in dancing poses, one looking in a hand mirror, and a lady holding a parrot. Above the beams and architraves rise frieze after frieze depicting scenes from the Mahabharata and the Ramayana.

Despite the shared provenance of the two temples, my eyes detect subtle differences in their sculptural styles. Many Belur sculptures play sports chatris and are perhaps more degraded by the elements than those of Halebidu. Being a constantly revered temple since the 12th century may have led to a faster degradation of this monument.

As this was a visit during COVID hours, we had to rush the same day, returning four hours to Bengaluru. But the temples of Hoysala are to be enjoyed at leisure. Each stone has a story to tell, each sculpture, an appealing knowledge to share.



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Student artist commemorates graduating class with mural https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/student-artist-commemorates-graduating-class-with-mural/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/30/student-artist-commemorates-graduating-class-with-mural/#respond Fri, 30 Apr 2021 00:13:52 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/student-artist-commemorates-graduating-class-with-mural/ Teenage artist Leo Li will leave a legacy at his school when he graduates this year. Over the past several months, his free time has been spent painting a large five-by-five-foot mural to commemorate his fellow graduates and the challenges they faced this year. Selected on an open call by the alumni committee, the grade […]]]>


Teenage artist Leo Li will leave a legacy at his school when he graduates this year.

Over the past several months, his free time has been spent painting a large five-by-five-foot mural to commemorate his fellow graduates and the challenges they faced this year. Selected on an open call by the alumni committee, the grade 12 student from Steveston-London will travel to Cornell University to study architecture in the fall.

“As far as I can remember, I have been an artist,” says Leo. “In Grade 10, my love for art and design also inspired me to pursue a career in architecture, an art that fundamentally makes life easier and helps society.

The plan, according to graduate committee teacher sponsor Jeff Mah, is for each subsequent graduating class to uphold the tradition by creating its own mural.

“We hit one out of the park with (Leo),” Mah says.

The painting was created over several months in the school hallway outside Mah’s classroom. Leo says he enjoyed being able to paint at school, which provided a connection between work and the school community, as well as interacting with students and staff who walked past him while he was painting.

“I savored these moments of coming together,” adds Leo.

After Leo finished painting, the class members signed their names on the outside of the painting. Alumni committee chair Shirley Li notes that it was difficult to incorporate pandemic protocols into the signature of the mural.

“Not all graduates are in school at the same time, which means we had to put in place a lunchtime signing period and an after-school signing period,” she says. “We had to disinfect all used pens and stand next to the mural at all times. I myself have found that reminding graduates to maintain their social distance has been the hardest part. Most arrive with their friends to sign the mural, so they weren’t always socially estranged from each other – trying to pull them apart was really a challenge.

But despite the challenges, the painting was enjoyed by those who saw it, and Mah says it was good to be able to start a new, positive tradition this year and honor the Grade 12 students whose milestone year was very different. Despite many typical events being canceled – the winter dinner dance, the post-graduation celebration, and even regular classes and opportunities to connect – the painting helped create a sense of connection.

“(The painting) has been outside for months and no child has ever played with it,” Mah says. “People were walking right by and looking at it, and it was a real community feeling because the kids were asking about it.”

The background of the painting, with a blurry image of the school building and masks flying in the sky, was inspired by Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai.

“All over the sky, masks fly like birds, replacing the concept of restraint usually associated with our facial covers with the idea of ​​release,” says Leo.

The running characters in the foreground are based on paintings by the artistic mentor of Leo Jianjun An, a Chinese artist and designer who runs an art school in Richmond. Leo says the bright colors and “expressive line art” of the characters represent the enduring and invincible energy of his fellow graduates.

“By illustrating these numbers, I hope to be able to capture a small part of the collective optimism that defines 2021 graduates, instead of portraying a dull reflection on adversity,” says Leo.

Shirley says the committee was fascinated by Leo’s artistic ability, as well as the symbolism of his proposal.

“In particular, what struck us about his art was the background with the flying masks, and the way the graduates freed themselves as they fled into the distance,” says Shirley.

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She says it was inspiring to be able to watch the progress of Leo’s painting day in and day out, and it gave her a sense of hope that her peers will be able to overcome the challenges of the pandemic. This is a sentiment shared by Leo when asked about the legacy left by the project.

“I hope that painting not only reminds students of the power of art, but also encourages their own reflection on the values ​​and traits that define themselves and what their aspirations might be. The artwork itself is one of many examples of efforts within the Steveston-London community to make the days of the school year pandemic – as different and alienating as they are – encouraging and uplifting.



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Spirit, emotion and scores: the story of Cambridge musical artist Louise Harris https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/spirit-emotion-and-scores-the-story-of-cambridge-musical-artist-louise-harris/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/spirit-emotion-and-scores-the-story-of-cambridge-musical-artist-louise-harris/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/spirit-emotion-and-scores-the-story-of-cambridge-musical-artist-louise-harris/ Louise harrisLouise harris Content Note: This article contains brief references to depression and suicidal tendencies. Going out with me is like a Cambridge term, by the Fifth week you’re completely exhausted Emotionally destroyed and suicidal. These lyrics are from a recent hit Dating with me is like a Cambridge term – an acoustic pop single […]]]>



Louise harrisLouise harris

Content Note: This article contains brief references to depression and suicidal tendencies.

Going out with me is like a Cambridge term, by the

Fifth week you’re completely exhausted

Emotionally destroyed and suicidal.

These lyrics are from a recent hit Dating with me is like a Cambridge term – an acoustic pop single with energetic staccato piano and comedic backing vocals. The song’s reference to Cambridge tenure cycles, its grim reference to toxic relationships, and its unconventional and intentionally sarcastic self-ridicule were potential reasons that led to the success garnering over 200,000 views on TikTok over a period of two. weeks.

The songwriter, instrumental artist and singer behind this piece is none other than Hertfordshire-High, Louise Harris, Cambridge alumnus. Since graduating from Fitzwilliam Psychology in 2019, Louise has only had eyes for music.

For Louise, Cambridge definitely played a role in her music career. She first started writing songs during her sophomore year – when she began to believe that music could be her career. She played at Cambridge May Balls which was her first performance experience outside of local pubs in Hertfordshire. Of all the experiences, an audition at the St John’s May Ball was particularly inspiring for Louise herself, as her performance as Valerie by Amy Winehouse and the positive response she received was a further boost to her decision to officially go into music. Louise further asserts that the path to music is one that she will never regret and never regret. “Every career has its own challenges and difficulties, but it’s about what sets you on fire, what makes you feel alive.”

Louise’s background as a psychologist also played a special role in her writing. In the previously mentioned hit Dating with me is like a Cambridge term, the witty lyrics were created in a certain thoughtful twilight at five in the morning, as she reflected on her past with men. From the implications of male chauvinism (“ too many arrogant thugs who say I’m supposed to be their wife ”) to emotionally draining relationships (“ emotionally destroyed and suicidal ”), Louise ultimately presents her song with the art of l ‘self-mockery (‘ all the boys, they’re trying to date me; they don’t know I’m crazy ‘) – mostly with inferences from what was said to her in a past toxic relationship. However, the song’s acoustic, catchy and seemingly light piano beats, along with the humorous references to the relatable Cambridge experiences (especially the depressing blues of week five), is a manifestation of how Louise manages to laugh in the face. ‘a disturbing experience and to make a’ final comeback ‘.



Louise’s single “Dating me is like a Cambridge Term”. Louise harris

Dating with me is like a Cambridge term is also accompanied by a clip, which Louise describes with passion: “given the title of the song, there was no other place where I could really film it!” But I also almost wanted to pay tribute to my time in Cambridge, because it was the best 3 years of my life. In the clip, I visit my college, Fitzwilliam, the house I lived in for second year, the ADC Theater, the River Cam, King’s Parade, and the University Library. It was so nice to see all these places again, which have a lot of good memories for me. I also do a lot of internal jokes and hidden references that Cambridge students can, I hope, relate to!

Louise suggests the concept of the shoot is simple: ‘I walk, sing, dance and sprint around Cambridge – I even throw oranges at one point – because it feels so free to just be me and not care about what is around me. it seems to me. And that’s the whole spirit of everything I do, in music and in life. I am myself with no excuses and always try to let go of things that are irrelevant. I hope people feel as free and happy listening to this song as I did when I filmed the video.

“A common thread in my writing is that it is emotionally motivated, so there are more possibilities for people to relate to. I’m not talking about specific events, just general emotional states and experiences that everyone relates to. “

Apart Dating with me is like a Cambridge term, Louise worked with DJ star ØZKAR from the Netherlands to produce the single EDM Do it right. His musical style is broad, ranging from “ emotional ballads and upbeat pop bangers to dance collaborations ” and it fits his passionate spirit well. “ I guess I want listeners to relate to the music, feel something and connect to something in their own lives, ” Louise explained with the hope that her lyrics, whatever story it was ‘they tell, connect with people in one way or another. “I just want people to almost make it their own, I hope they just enjoy it… whether it puts them in a good mood, or helps them work on something… all of this is good news for me” .

“ A common thread in my writing is that it is emotionally driven, so there are more possibilities for people to relate to. I’m not talking about specific events, just general emotional states and experiences that everyone relates to. Ultimately Louise’s goal is simple: to make people feel ‘less alone’, and not just ‘being themselves’, but ‘without excuse themselves’ without any shame or fear. .

For now, Louise is strategically building a career as an artist – releasing singles every two to three months. Her musical drive is heavily inspired by artists such as Matt Maltese and Imagine Dragons while her artistic vibes are often compared to those of British singer Lily Allen. Louise has already garnered positive reviews from famous names in UK industry such as Kat Bawden (PR for Tones and I), John Earls (NME reporter) and most recently BBC Radio 6 Introducing’s Tom Robinson, who on his mixtape compared Louise’s song Dating with me is like a Cambridge term to the revenge songs of Bob Dylan and Lily Allen. Many expect to see a lot more from Louise Harris.

For more information on Louise Harris’ musical profile, please visit her Linktr.ee page.



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“Everyone Was Talking About Freedom”: Louis Menand on American Culture of the Cold War https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/everyone-was-talking-about-freedom-louis-menand-on-american-culture-of-the-cold-war/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/everyone-was-talking-about-freedom-louis-menand-on-american-culture-of-the-cold-war/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 23:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/everyone-was-talking-about-freedom-louis-menand-on-american-culture-of-the-cold-war/ Louis menandMatthew Valentine “I believe if you do what you want to and believe in doing it for yourself, regardless of what everyone else seems to want from you, at some point the world will meet you halfway. path. You have to have confidence in it. That was the advice Professor Menand left me at […]]]>



Louis menandMatthew Valentine

“I believe if you do what you want to and believe in doing it for yourself, regardless of what everyone else seems to want from you, at some point the world will meet you halfway. path. You have to have confidence in it.

That was the advice Professor Menand left me at the end of our conversation; it may also be the underlying principle of his own career. As well as being both an arts and science professor and professor of English at Harvard University, Menand is also a prolific writer for The New Yorker. Its history of philosophical pragmatism, The metaphysical club, won the Pulitzer Prize in 2002; and in 2016, he was awarded the National Medal for the Humanities and Social Sciences by President Obama.

Now, in his latest published book, Menand presents us with an exploration of American culture after WWII. “There is a change that I am trying to capture. In the years after 1945, the United States was widely regarded as a benevolent power that had led the fight against fascism and then helped rebuild Western Europe and Japan. But it was also considered culturally to be somewhat peripheral or provincial. People didn’t really think of America as a civilization like they thought of France or Britain. Around 1965 that changed. This was the year the United States intervened militarily in Vietnam, which caused it to lose the political capital it had accumulated after World War II. But it has gained a central place in an increasingly global world culture. This is the transformation that my book tries to explain, ”he says.

“The Cold War raised the stakes; he charged the atmosphere; everything was so important that maybe they hadn’t mattered before that or later “

What Menand suggests is that the rise of American culture can be explained by an examination of the intellectual and cultural history of the Cold War. For him, this endeavor involved the exploration of a very large number of actors, ranging from political activists and thinkers such as Martin Luther King Jr., Isaiah Berlin and Betty Friedan, to writers, poets, artists, filmmakers. and musicians like Allen. Ginsberg, Lionel Trilling, James Baldwin and Elvis Presley. When asked about his writing style, Menand told me, “My training as a writer came from writing magazines. Magazine writing is all about keeping the reader’s interest and making them enjoyable to read. I try to write my book in the exact same way, while meeting all the requirements of academic history writing. So in a way it’s a huge magazine article with quotes.

For Menand, it is difficult to generalize the twenty-year period between 1945 and 1965, which explains the lack of a thematic common thread in his book. Nonetheless, a distinguishing feature that Menand brings out is the fact that freedom was a term used by virtually everyone. “It wasn’t until about two-thirds of the time I wrote the book that I realized that everyone was talking about freedom as a concept that justifies or validates or legitimizes everything they do,” he says. . But because freedom has been invoked across the political spectrum, by both integrationists and segregationists, for example, Menand observes that there was “no one-sidedness of freedom” and that it is thus become in a sense “an empty term”.

“You know we have terms like that today, terms that everyone uses all the time because it’s a good value to keep in mind all the time, or because it shows that you are good. side; and freedom was the end of this period. I haven’t solved the freedom problem – what does that really mean? It’s a very problematic concept, but I’m exploring the careers of the people who brought it up.

According to Menand, it was also a period that saw considerable interest in the nature of art. People were interested in asking questions like, “What is a painting?” What is a poem? How to interpret a poem? “

Although they practiced “art for the sake of art,” Menand emphasizes the importance of the Cold War artists during this period: “Overall (there are obvious exceptions) they were not consciously interested in the political implications of what they were doing. But what they did mattered because one of the issues of the Cold War was defending the principle of freedom of expression, which would allow artists to represent whatever they wanted and use whatever style they wanted. they wanted, against the official Soviet aesthetic, which was socialist realism. Part of the challenge was therefore to live up to this ideal: to make “free” art.

“People were very concerned after 1945 about the possibility that liberal democracies such as the United States could fall into totalitarianism. This is really what George Orwell’s novel 1984 was on; it was a work of fiction, of course, but behind it was a genuine concern about how the story might turn out. And this was repeated by Hannah Arendt and other writers on totalitarianism during the period.

“The fact that people care so much about what kind of painting you do or what kind of music you listen to etc. has something to do with this idea that before we know it we might slip on the ladder for 1984. The Cold War raised the stakes; he charged the atmosphere; it made everything matter in a way that maybe wouldn’t have mattered before that or later.

Indeed, for Menand, it is important to situate art in the context of its creation. As he explained to me, “my approach to intellectual history is to combine biography and social history, because I see cultural production as arising from an intersection between an individual life history and constantly changing social conditions. To put it in a ‘pop’ way, there’s kind of a moment when the world suddenly needs a Jackson Pollock or an Andy Warhol. I try to capture these moments. “

Was America’s cultural ascendancy in fact a legacy of the Cold War? What does freedom mean today and how is the term used? Does art still matter as it did? These are the questions that Menand’s ambitious historical inquiry raises for the moment.

Professor Menand’s book, The Free World: A Cultural History of the Cold War, will be released in the UK by Harper Collins in September.



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Peter Eleey joins UCCA Center for Contemporary Art as General Curator – ARTnews.com https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/peter-eleey-joins-ucca-center-for-contemporary-art-as-general-curator-artnews-com/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/peter-eleey-joins-ucca-center-for-contemporary-art-as-general-curator-artnews-com/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 21:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/peter-eleey-joins-ucca-center-for-contemporary-art-as-general-curator-artnews-com/ Peter Eleey, who resigned last year as chief curator of MoMA PS1 in New York City, has joined the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing as commissioner general. In her new role, Eleey will develop the institution’s exhibits, programs and curatorial direction as it expands to Shanghai this year. According to a statement, “He […]]]>


Peter Eleey, who resigned last year as chief curator of MoMA PS1 in New York City, has joined the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing as commissioner general. In her new role, Eleey will develop the institution’s exhibits, programs and curatorial direction as it expands to Shanghai this year.

According to a statement, “He will also periodically hold exhibitions at UCCA and work to expand the museum’s program and partnerships from its base in New York.” For the past month, Eleey has been leading a weekly seminar for the UCCA conservation team.

We have a critical mass of smart young conservatives and now is the perfect time to bring in someone who can be kind of a mentor figure, ”UCCA director Philip Tinari said in an interview. “It is very important that UCCA becomes more and more mature as an institution and is able to generate better and better content as we grow.”

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Although most associate Eleey with the New York art scene, Tinari pointed out that he has worked with Chinese artists such as Cai Guo-Qiang, Song Dong, Zhang Huan, and Zheng Guogu. Together with Klaus Biesenbach, Eleey also oversaw the 2017 exhibition “.com / .cn”, a survey of technological ecosystems in China and the West that was presented at the K11 Art Foundation in Hong Kong and Shanghai. “He [was] very active in this part of the world years before the pandemic, ”said Tinari.

Eleey worked at MoMA PS1 from 2010, and he held his first curatorial position there in 2016. Some of her curatorial credits at this institution include the 2019 exhibition “Theater of Operations: The Gulf Wars 1991-2011 », Which he co-organized with Ruba Katrib; the 2015 edition of the “Greater New York” survey; and solo exhibitions for Ian Cheng, Henry Taylor and other artists. He is currently working on a survey of the work of Deana Lawson, which begins at ICA Boston this fall.

Eleey was named in a 2018 discrimination complaint from Nikki Columbus, who claimed he offered her the job of performance curator at PS1 only to cancel it when she revealed she recently had a baby. The complaint was settled in 2019.

He said in a statement: “I am delighted to join UCCA and its great team during this exciting time of museum growth. I look forward to working with the staff to attract new audiences and build on UCCA’s pioneering heritage in dynamic programming.



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Glamor faded from mid-century print media https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/glamor-faded-from-mid-century-print-media/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/glamor-faded-from-mid-century-print-media/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 19:29:47 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/glamor-faded-from-mid-century-print-media/ In a town whose information kiosks have turned into glorified chewing gum shops, where the shelves at the Grand Central Newsstand are overrun with chips and phone chargers, one of my few happy places left is Casa Magazines. It’s a store hole on the corner of Eighth Avenue and 12th Street, and every wall and […]]]>


In a town whose information kiosks have turned into glorified chewing gum shops, where the shelves at the Grand Central Newsstand are overrun with chips and phone chargers, one of my few happy places left is Casa Magazines. It’s a store hole on the corner of Eighth Avenue and 12th Street, and every wall and square inch of ground lifts obscure international fashion and design publications, for a declining class of fashion and design enthusiasts. print. (I still remember, when I founded a magazine in 2015, the relief I felt seeing my first issue stacked on the floor of Casa; then it was real.) Once upon a time, before New York is engulfed in the smartphone screen. , the city had dozens of stores like this. Now, if you care about fashion photography and print design, you are probably in a museum.

Print media nostalgics should look for “Modern Look: Photography and the American Magazine” at the Jewish Museum. It offers a nostalgic look at the fashion and editorial photography of the last century – with snapshots by Edward Steichen, Irving Penn, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, for publications like Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Life, Look, Fortune and others.

With only 150 works, including several facsimiles, the show is too small and infrequent for comfort. In many places, this looks more like a drive-by of mid-century American graphics and photographs than a systematic study. (Among those absent: photographers George Hoyningen-Huene and Horst P. Horst, and designer Alvin Lustig.)

I myself have more satisfaction with the catalog, which reproduces many paintings and photos not visible in the museum. Its essays are meatier than the gallery’s presentation, and it includes one on Gordon Parks’ editorial work by art historian Maurice Berger, who died last year in the early weeks of the coronavirus pandemic. Yet the Jewish Museum’s focus on New York media from the 1930s to the 1950s offers an escape hatch from the similarity of our digital lives, at a time when American media could still imagine the ‘to come up.

American magazine photography, like American design more generally, was shaken around 1930 by Central Europe. Photographers in Weimar, Germany had turned away from the soft, pictorial imagery that dominated previous decades and used editing, multiple exposures, tall and narrow lenses, and irregular focus to rethink photography for a new society. industrial (although photography did not enter the Bauhaus curriculum until 1929). At the entrance to this show is an experimental still life by Berlin duo Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach, better known as Ringl & Pit, who used cut paper and glued fabrics to color bottled hair.

Over the next decade, Jewish immigrants and other European exiles will bring these innovations to the United States. German refugee Erwin Blumenfeld, one of the foremost fashion photographers of the time, covered the bodies of his models with distorted shadows, or increased the contrast so strong that parts of their faces disappeared into voids white. Martin Munkacsi of Hungary pulled out a fashion editorial from the studio, including when he pictured a model in a one-piece swimsuit walking across a fuzzy beach: a defining image of 1930s glamor.

Herbert Matter, from Switzerland, took abstract photographs of white fabric twirling in deep black space, which resulted in advertisements for stockings. Their arrival coincided with advances in photographic reproduction, as well as a bolder, more modern sort of magazine layout – discussed in this exhibition’s catalog but only in partial view in the galleries.

The two great artistic directors of the years around WWII – Alexander Liberman at Vogue and Alexey Brodovitch at Harper’s Bazaar – were both white Russian émigrés, and both had made their debuts behind the camera. Brodovich brought in photographers who summed up and stylized the fashions of the time, and in his own work, especially the famous “Ballet” photo book, he scrambled and blurred bodies into grainy fantasies.

Liberman began his career with the pioneering French photo magazine Vu, then brought a disjunctive and highly graphic style to Vogue that drew on photomontages of Russian constructivism. Images from 1940s Vogue could overlap or be placed at an angle, and the dresses and shoes appeared in weird, surreal proportions. (These immigrants make “Modern Look” an interesting corollary of “Engineer, Agitator, Constructor,” the interwar graphic exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art earlier this year. assembly of soviet origin to sell revolution or eyeliner.)

“Modern Look” evokes 1940s Vogue through images of Penn, Blumenfeld, but also Frances McLaughlin-Gill, the first female contract fashion photographer there, who photographed models on street corners, in dinners and outside the city’s chicest new building: the United Nations Secretariat. There are also reproductions of covers on freestanding panels – including the extraordinary March 1945 issue, photographed by Blumenfeld and produced by Liberman, of a model blurred behind two pieces of duct tape, next to the caption “Do your part. for the Red Cross. ”Scary and sad to think that no mainstream fashion title would now publish such a bold cover – and there’s more in the catalog, which replicates Vogue’s presentation of Buchenwald’s photographs in the issue. from June 1945, shot by Lee Miller.

Beyond fashion, the show also includes editorial photography, engaged with segregation and class and the aftermath of war, by artists like Parks, Margaret-Bourke White and Lisette Model. The same graphic innovations began to appear in trade publications like Fortune and in the booming advertising industry. You wish this show was more associated with typographical and layout innovations, by designers such as Lustig and Ladislav Sutnar, who accompanied these mid-century photographs on the printed page. But what’s here, especially the crisp, colorful facsimiles of German-born designer Will Burtin’s science magazine Scope covers, will first delight and then depress those of us trapped in optimized minimalism. for Instagram of contemporary marketing. (How many more rounded letters on the coral and beige backgrounds should I take?)

By the mid-1950s, that golden age had started to rust. The TV came on. Advertising revenues have declined; the same was true for the number of pages. Editorial has become less experimental, but “Modern Look” has a coda of post-war photographers, like William Klein and Saul Leiter, who have found an autonomous voice in the art world. Klein had contributed as a youngster to Liberman’s Vogue, but the magazine would soon have no room for his unpolished street photography – not to mention his “Atom Bomb Sky, New York,” a 1955 cityscape which the slow exposure makes the Manhattan sunset look like Hiroshima. .

But today, even the art world no longer offers an escape from the normative pressures of the social web, where art and advertising and your friends’ vacation photos all have the same optimized colors and surfaces. polished. (It got so bad that Juergen Teller, one of the few remaining photographers to use unfiltered lighting and irregular flash, was recently denounced by cameraphone junkies as a ‘bad’ photographer.) The roots of ‘Modern Look’ do not come from the glamorous demise of mid-century print media, but from the overwhelming demonstration of how technologies we once thought could unleash creativity, ended up enforcing algorithmic rules. the most stringent. As for my beloved Casa Magazines on Eighth Avenue, the friends at the store did whatever it takes to save the printing business: they created it with an Instagram account.


Modern look: photography and the American magazine

Until July 11, The Jewish Museum, 1109 Fifth Ave. at 92nd Street, Manhattan, 212.423.3200, thejewishmuseum.org. Pre-timed tickets required.





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Drexel Names New IT Cluster After Historic Alumnus | Now https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/drexel-names-new-it-cluster-after-historic-alumnus-now/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/drexel-names-new-it-cluster-after-historic-alumnus-now/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 19:07:30 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/drexel-names-new-it-cluster-after-historic-alumnus-now/ Portrait of Susan La Flesche Picotte, 1889 graduate of Woman’s Medical College, Pennsylvania. Photo courtesy of Legacy Center Archives, Drexel College of Medicine In 2014, when researchers affiliated with the University Research Computing Facility (URCF) at Drexel University decided on the name of its first cluster of high-performance computers, they opted for an ancient mythological […]]]>


Portrait of Susan La Flesche Picotte, 1889 graduate of Woman’s Medical College, Pennsylvania. Photo courtesy of Legacy Center Archives, Drexel College of Medicine

In 2014, when researchers affiliated with the University Research Computing Facility (URCF) at Drexel University decided on the name of its first cluster of high-performance computers, they opted for an ancient mythological choice: Proteus, the god of the sea that changes shape from Greek mythology. .

By naming its replacement IT cluster, URCF has gone with something a little closer to home.

Picotte, which opened in February, is named in honor of Susan La Flesche Picotte (1865-1915), MD, who, according to current research, was the first Native American to become a physician in the United States. graduated in 1889 from one of the previous schools of Drexel University College of Medicine, Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania (WMCP), one of the world’s first medical schools for women and which has graduated many physicians innovative.

Daughter of Pierre La Flesche, or Iron Eye, a chief of the Omaha tribe, Picotte grew up on the Omaha reservation in Nebraska at a time when the U.S. government was forcing tribes to settle on and assimilate. to white society. She was inspired to become a doctor after watching a sick Native American woman die after a white doctor refused to treat her. After graduating a year earlier and leading her class at WMCP, she returned to western Nebraska, initially working as the sole physician of the Omaha and neighboring tribes of Winnebago while working for the Office of Indian Affairs, then treating patients on and off the reservation when she entered private practice. In 1913, she founded a hospital on the reserve – the first private hospital on a Native American reservation – which is now a national historic monument named in her honor.

In addition to her work and medical status, Picotte was a public health advocate, community leader, and social reformer who fought to expand the rights and opportunities of the Omaha people. His pioneering accomplishments have been recognized in the medical and Native American communities, most recently in a PBS 2020 documentary, a 2016 biography, and a 2017 Google Doodle.

“When we were trying to come up with a name for the new Research Computing Center, we wanted to highlight a notable figure in Drexel history, and history more broadly,” said Geoffrey Mainland, PhD, Associate Professor computer science in college. of Computing & Informatics and Chairman of the URCF Governance Council. “In addition to being significantly faster than its predecessor, the Picotte cluster adds support for researchers working with protected health information (PHI), which will enable a whole new class of healthcare-related informatics research at Drexel. “

Picotte, and URCF in general, is an important resource for faculty, professional staff, and students doing IT work at Drexel in many different fields and fields. It offers centralized costs, support and resources in one place specially equipped to support this type of IT installation – with Senior Systems Administrator David Chin, PhD, onsite to manage and run it. Professors can invest their faculty’s start-up funds into existing URCF facilities, and their grants or departments can help expand it by purchasing additional compute nodes, rather than buying and operating their own.

A data server used in Picotte.  Photo credit: David Chin.

A data server used in Picotte. Photo credit: David Chin.

Founded in 2013, the URCF supports a community of people from across the University with extremely varied fields who all use this calculation tool in their own fields. For just a few examples, there is the finite element analysis of materials engineering researchers at the College of Engineering; computational gene sequencing and computational chemistry researchers from the College of Arts and Sciences; machine learning by researchers at the College of Computing & Informatics; and statistical computation by researchers at LeBow College of Business.

Picotte offers new equipment (associate vice president for core technology infrastructure, Ken Blackney negotiated the purchase of Dell), new storage system and new infrastructure for members of the IT research center of the University, which is part of the Office of Research and Innovation. Much of the upgrade includes graphics processing unit (GPU) nodes and large memory machines capable of processing large amounts of data quickly, which is a major upgrade from Proteus’ offerings.

During its first five years, the installation and Proteus supported the research of more than 100 active users and 70 IPs, as well as their teams; generated searches for hundreds of articles; created new courses, supported more than a dozen undergraduate and graduate classes to train students using advanced computing; and generated $ 53.9 million in research spending and 9% of total research spending.

It is the continuation of an investment the University made eight years ago in high performance computing to create URCF and equip it with Proteus. This was the first time that the University had a centralized location to house IT infrastructure, after a $ 2 million renovation of the old firing range between the third and fourth floors of the main building (which housed formerly the University’s rifle programs, including its nationally recognized women’s team and university-wide turkey shooting competitionse century; the range was then closed when the rifle program ended at the start of the 21st century). Previously, researchers spent their time and money buying and maintaining their own computer technology, which was often housed in spaces without adequate cooling and noise blocking measures (when there was even room).

The exterior of the university research computer facility.  Photo credit: David Chin.

The exterior of the university research computer facility. Photo credit: David Chin.

Picotte’s equipment was purchased with funds from an NSF Major Research Instrumentation Grant to Extend Proteus for Data-Intensive Computing, which was awarded to Gail Rosen, PhD, professor of electrical and computer engineering at the College of Engineering , and three co-researchers. (Brigita Urbanc, PhD, Associate Director of the Department of Graduate Studies and Professor in the Department of Physics at the College of Arts and Sciences; Antonios Kontsos, PhD, Associate Professor of Mechanical and Mechanical Engineering at the College of Engineering; and Hasan Ayaz, PhD , Associate Professor in the School of Biomedical Engineering, Health Sciences and Systems). The grant was $ 540,000, and Joshua Lequieu, PhD, assistant professor of chemical and biological engineering at the College of Engineering, contributed approximately $ 150,000 of his seed money. Drexel matched the funding, for a total purchase order of nearly $ 1.3 million.

Rosen, who has been a URCF board member since 2013 and president from 2017 to 2019, needed faster architectures with more memory for her data intensive work in computational biology. “DNA files collected from microbial communities around the world consume terabytes per study,” explained Rosen, and said the computation could run “in a fraction of the time on multi-core GPUs,” like the ones that exist today. in Picotte.

The motivation for purchasing the hardware for Picotte was to keep pace with data-intensive applications, Rosen said, and to share the infrastructure (and its consuming maintenance) with the URCF community.

“Although I run a lot of calculations, they can run quickly in parallel and we need a lot of time to write articles,” she said. “Equipment depreciates quickly – so it is more efficient to use the funds if other researchers can use the equipment when we are not.”

The purchase and implementation of Picotte is just a continuation of Rosen’s work for the benefit of the Computer Research Center and the University community. It is also a continuation of how her own research, and that of her group, has benefited from this work.

A data server in Picotte.  Photo credit: David Chin.

A data server in Picotte. Photo credit: David Chin.

“Proteus allowed my group to examine the problems caused by the ‘data deluge’, such as the growth of databases and experimental data, in biology,” said Rosen. “A good example is that we were able to run an algorithm that classifies which organisms are in a microbiome based on their DNA, using time snapshots of a database of exponentially growing genomes. We made our algorithm more efficient and showed that researchers could get better results faster than the traditional computationally inefficient method. These simulation experiments used a lot of computation, and Proteus made that possible. Now we just got a grant from NSF to develop more efficient algorithms for identifying organisms and genes from microbiomes. We could not have shown the effectiveness of our method if we had not had all the calculations provided by Proteus.

Now that Picotte is up and running – there has been a delay and numerous complications due to the COVID-19 pandemic – Mainland is hoping that Picotte’s implementation creates more opportunities for students and faculty in the computation field. GPU and Drexel’s diverse computer research community in general.

“It shows a real commitment and investment on the part of the University in computer science, and it’s something that’s happening here in many disciplines,” Mainland said. “I think it speaks very well of the University that we were able to secure this NSF grant, which shows that the funding agency also values ​​the research being done at Drexel and sees promise in the work we do here.

For more information on the university research computing facility, contact Support for URCF. For more information on the URCF Governance Council, contact the chair.



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New Colorado Springs Art Installation Inspired by ‘Queen’s Gambit’ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/new-colorado-springs-art-installation-inspired-by-queens-gambit/ https://iainabrach.org/2021/04/29/new-colorado-springs-art-installation-inspired-by-queens-gambit/#respond Thu, 29 Apr 2021 18:15:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/new-colorado-springs-art-installation-inspired-by-queens-gambit/ It’s safe to say chess is at its peak thanks to the Netflix miniseries ‘The Queen’s Gambit’. The wildly popular show was watched by 62 million households in the first 28 days after its October release, more than any scripted limited series by Netflix, the Bloomberg.com website reported in December. The show is based on […]]]>


It’s safe to say chess is at its peak thanks to the Netflix miniseries ‘The Queen’s Gambit’.

The wildly popular show was watched by 62 million households in the first 28 days after its October release, more than any scripted limited series by Netflix, the Bloomberg.com website reported in December. The show is based on the 1983 novel of the same name by Walter Tevis.

Count Adhya Spencer and her husband, artist Diego Jaguart, are two of those fascinated by the coming-of-age drama about an orphaned chess prodigy with a drug and drug addiction. alcohol that stuns the competitive chess circuit with its daring moves. So much so that they were inspired to create an immersive, multi-month art installation, much like the iconic large-scale Meow Wolf art installation, and thematize it around the show.

Spencer lists the reasons for his worship: “The way it was filmed. The actress is Argentinian – my husband is from there. The content of the series. He took this country by storm. People are obsessed. Failures have skyrocketed. “

“UV: Queen Art Experience” will open with a free reception on Friday at the COATI Uprise downtown. The evening will feature a live artistic experience of Jaguart and projection mapping creator Mauricio Caicedo; themed food and drinks; a DJ; body painting and more. In May, the food hall will organize a chess tournament. Installation will take place until June.

Eight artists will build installations based on all facets of ‘The Queen’s Gambit’, including its furniture, fashion and music from the 50s and 60s. Visitors will wander the space and have the chance to interact with each. installation, including Jodie Bliss’s 8-foot Queen of Metal, Monument blacksmith and metal maker, and Liza Tudor’s augmented reality parade.

“There is a collaboration of all artists,” says Adriana Jones Rincon, executive director of the Smokebrush Foundation for the Arts. Smokebrush is a sponsor of the event. “Like Meow Wolf, they all come together and create multiple pieces in one space.”

Creating this kind of immersive affair is not a new endeavor for the couple, who produced “UV: Ultravision Art Experience” in 2019 at Marmalade at Smokebrush. The Arts Month event attracted 400 people.

“The art experience isn’t just looking at the art on the wall,” says Spencer. “It’s immersive or interactive, so people do things and are surrounded by art. It can encompass other senses, not just vision. “

Contact the writer: 636-0270

Contact the writer: 636-0270



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