Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:30:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://iainabrach.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/default1-150x150.png Art Period – Iain Abrach http://iainabrach.org/ 32 32 10 real paintings featured in the show (and what they mean) https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/10/10-real-paintings-featured-in-the-show-and-what-they-mean/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 02:30:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/10/10-real-paintings-featured-in-the-show-and-what-they-mean/ Currently streaming on Netflix, Blue period is the long-awaited adaptation of one of the critically acclaimed manga of recent years. He follows aimless teenager Yatora as he discovers a passion for art and the long, difficult journey he takes to secure a scholarship to an art school. RELATED: 5 Reasons To Be Excited For The […]]]>

Currently streaming on Netflix, Blue period is the long-awaited adaptation of one of the critically acclaimed manga of recent years. He follows aimless teenager Yatora as he discovers a passion for art and the long, difficult journey he takes to secure a scholarship to an art school.

RELATED: 5 Reasons To Be Excited For The Blue Period Anime

Along the way, viewers will be treated to a cavalcade of beautiful paintings produced by Yatora and his classmates. All artists learn from imitation, and the series features famous paintings from the real world.

ten Girl with a Pearl Earring (Johannes Vermeer, 1665)


blue vintage girl with pearl earring

This painting by Johannes Vermeer is used by Oda, the teacher of the Yatora Preparatory School, as an example of a masterpiece with a clear composition, and it is not difficult to see why: its simple image and iconic cemented it as a painting in the art world.

It even stands out from other works by Vermeer, with the dark, solid background contrasting with his usual scenes of realistically cluttered domestic life. What really draws viewers to the painting, however, is the girl’s facial expression: an enigmatic face like that of the Mona Lisa.

9 Seascape near Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer (Vincent Van Gogh, 1888)


blue period Seascape near Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer

This seascape is not one of Van Gogh’s most famous works, but it still shows his ever-brilliant use of color and movement. Like all great seascapes, the waves seem to have been captured in an instant and yet about to crash again.

Van Gogh wrote to his brother how difficult it was to capture the exact color of the sea, noting that it changed with every movement of the light. Blues, greens, yellows and purplish tones can all be seen in this painting.


8 Gabrielle d’Estrées and one of her sisters (Unknown, c.1594)


Viewers might well have had a double take when this painting appeared in Oda’s composition explanation. There is (supposedly) an innocent explanation, as the gesture would have been taken as an announcement of the woman’s pregnancy.

It is a fascinating work that is both provocative and enigmatic, and therefore has survived even with the name of the long-lost painter.


seven Poppy Field (Gustav Klimt, 1907)


blue period poppy field

Gustav Klimt is perhaps most famous for his works featuring human figures, such as The kiss, but his landscapes – like this one, which Yatora is commissioned to replicate in order to practice composition – are still immediately recognizable as his work, thanks to their incredibly vivid use of color; looking at this painting really feels like peeking into a fantasy world.

This immersion is accentuated by the way in which the composition draws the gaze into the dreamlike landscape, which, as Yatora learns, is an extremely powerful effect.


6 The Desperate Man (Gustave Courbet, 1843-1845)


blue period the desperate man

Gustave Courbet is notable for his emphasis on realism, with several of his most famous paintings depicting scenes of peasants and laborers working in the countryside. as an astonishing testimony to the strength of an artist’s personality.

RELATED: 10 Most Talented Artists In Anime

It’s so applicable to the series, in fact, that a recreation starring Yatora appeared as one of the manga chapter’s cover pages. The desperation to make good art is, it seems, something that transcends eras, styles and the barrier between fiction and reality.


5 Young Woman with a Water Jug (Johannes Vermeer, 1662-65)


Blue period young woman with a jug of water

Audiences get a good look at this painting in Episode 3, as it is the example Hashida uses when detailing his opinion of art as “inedible food.” Even so, it would be easy to confuse it with one of Vermeer’s most famous works, The milk girl. The two paintings represent a woman dressed in blue, with a jug, under a window in a domestic space.

This theme repetition, however, should not be viewed as negative – on the contrary, it shows just how devoted Vermeer was to perfecting a particular kind of atmosphere.


4 A young woman in 1866 (Édouard Manet, 1866)


blue period young woman 1866

The really wonderful thing about this painting, which appears in the background in Episode 3, is that it combines a masterful portrait with elements of still life – the seemingly incongruous peeled orange on the floor being one of the kind‘s calling cards. Manet is clearly keen to show all he can do.

And, yes, this is Manet, despite the absence of his branded boundary-pushing subject seen in works like Lunch on the Grass and Olympia, who questioned what nudes could be in art. It’s still an extraordinary piece, however, and one that Yatora will hopefully better seen than viewers.




3 Madame Manet at Bellevue (Édouard Manet, 1880)


blue period madame manet in bellevue

This is the second portrait of Manet that can be seen in the background when Yatora and his classmates visit the art gallery, and it serves, alongside Manet’s previous one. a young woman, like a sort of microcosm of Manet’s entire career, the careful realism of the previous work giving way to a few impressionist brushstrokes in this painting.

But, whatever style he uses, Manet remains one of the best portrait painters of all time. With just a handful of brush strokes, he captures his wife’s quiet balance perfectly.


2 The dance class (Edgar Degas, 1874)


blue period the dance class

It’s the painting that really captures Yatora’s attention and inspiration when he sees her at the museum with Hashida and Yotasuke, and it’s not hard to see why. Of all his many works and subjects, Degas’s ballet studies are the most admired. The sparkling tutus and the elegant, expressive gestures of the dancers are perfectly suited to Impressionism, but Degas also knows how to make the scene domestic cozy and realistic.

RELATED: 10 Anime Characters Who Love To Dance

Anecdote: the male figure is in fact a famous ballet master, Jules Perrot.


1 Starry Night (Vincent Van Gogh, 1888)


starry night blue period

No no The starry Night, that famous swirling sky that almost all spectators know well; this similarly titled painting was done by Van Gogh several months ago and shows him discovering the color effects he would later use to such great effect.

This piece captivates Yatora, who chooses it as a work of art he loves that he must examine in monochrome. He might be drawn to her because, with her palette of blues and calm, nocturnal atmosphere, she reminds him of the pre-dawn Shibuya that inspired his very first painting.

NEXT: DIY Anime: 10 Best Anime On Making Art


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SLO Holiday Crime Rate Indicates A Throwback to Pre-Pandemic Times | News | San Luis Obispo https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/06/slo-holiday-crime-rate-indicates-a-throwback-to-pre-pandemic-times-news-san-luis-obispo/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 12:03:20 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/06/slo-holiday-crime-rate-indicates-a-throwback-to-pre-pandemic-times-news-san-luis-obispo/ It was not all celebrations for the city of San Luis Obispo this holiday season. The city has seen an increase in crime rates, which police say is a sign that crime patterns are returning to a pre-pandemic state. Data from the SLO Police Department showed crime reports increased 26% between November 26, 2021 and […]]]>

It was not all celebrations for the city of San Luis Obispo this holiday season. The city has seen an increase in crime rates, which police say is a sign that crime patterns are returning to a pre-pandemic state.

Data from the SLO Police Department showed crime reports increased 26% between November 26, 2021 and January 3, 2022 (the period between Thanksgiving and New Years celebrations), compared to the same dates in the period 2020-21. period.

Reports of property theft, aggravated and non-aggravated assault, alcohol-related crimes, vehicle theft, and residential and non-residential burglaries have increased during the holidays. Auto theft and burglary alerts have declined.

“It’s very difficult to compare anything to last year given the COVID pandemic and how it has changed the cityscape. Many students have stayed at home, businesses have opened reduced hours and / or reduced capacity, ”said SLOPD Operations Captain Brian Amoroso. New times by email. “There are definitely more people out on vacation last year than in 2020-21. For example, there aren’t many drunks in public arrests and DUIs if the bars are all closed. ”

People trying to return to a pre-COVID-19 lifestyle have also influenced when the crimes occurred. During the 2021-2022 holiday season, reports of criminal activity were highest on Mondays, Tuesdays and Fridays. But during the 2020-21 holiday season, weekends saw the highest concentration.

“The students are back in town. The residents are for the most part back to work. People tend to report things to the police at the start of the week instead of using their time on the weekends,” said Amoroso.

Click to enlarge

  • Photo courtesy of Old Mission School
  • SMASH-AND-GRAB Vandals broke into the Mission Thrift Store, stole items totaling up to $ 500, and destroyed a display case and cash register.

Most recently, the Mission Thrift Store was broken into in the early hours of Tuesday, January 4, when vandals smashed store windows and stole items totaling up to $ 500.

“Our thrift store manager received a phone call from the alarm company around 5 am saying that the store had been broken into. When she went to the store, she saw that the window was broken. They walked over to one of the windows and wreaked havoc on the cash register, ”said Melissa Newman, director of marketing and enrollment at the Old Mission School.

Fortunately, the cash register was empty because Mission Thrift doesn’t leave money in the cash register overnight. The destroyed register has been replaced by one donated by a member of the community.

The stolen items included pocket knives, art supplies and antique playing cards. Newman said thrift store manager Michelle Orradre was concerned about the pocket knives being stolen because they could later be used as a weapon.

It cost an additional $ 200 to fix the broken glass, and Orradre is worried the store will have to pay for more damage. The store’s sales make up nearly 10 percent of the Old Mission School’s budget, Newman said.

“I contacted the manager there and she said the theft and break-in was a heavy emotional and financial toll; she now feels unsettled to be there alone at night / early in the morning,” Newman said. .

Amoroso said the SLOPD currently has no suspects of a break-in and is trying to obtain potential video footage of the incident.

“One of the best ways to protect yourself and your belongings is to lock the doors and windows of your home and vehicle. Do not leave anything of value in plain sight, or in a vehicle if possible,” did he declare. “Be aware of your surroundings. Report any suspicious activity to the police. Knowledgeable citizens can be a force multiplier for law enforcement.” ??


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Adam McKay and Netflix take fright comedy mainstream with ‘Don’t Look Up’ https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/04/adam-mckay-and-netflix-take-fright-comedy-mainstream-with-dont-look-up/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 14:00:19 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/04/adam-mckay-and-netflix-take-fright-comedy-mainstream-with-dont-look-up/ This is the 2022 first edition of the Wide Shot Entertainment Industry Newsletter. If it has been forwarded to you, sign up here to have it delivered to your inbox. “Twenty thousand years ago, seven more to go” – Bo Burnham, song “That Funny Feeling” from “Inside” “We really had it all, didn’t we? – […]]]>

This is the 2022 first edition of the Wide Shot Entertainment Industry Newsletter. If it has been forwarded to you, sign up here to have it delivered to your inbox.

“Twenty thousand years ago, seven more to go” – Bo Burnham, song “That Funny Feeling” from “Inside”

“We really had it all, didn’t we? – Dr Randall Mindy, “Don’t Look Upward”

During the doomsday satire press tour “Don’t Look Up”, writer-director Adam McKay referred to some obvious characteristics – “Dr. Strangelove” and “Network” among them – who inspired his portfolio of government, media and industry.

I thought about these works while watching the movie during the holidays, of course. But I also recalled a very different type of film: “On the Beach” by Stanley Kramer.

Like “Don’t Look Up,” Kramer’s film for United Artists was a mass-market product anchored by high-powered stars (Gregory Peck, Ava Gardner and Fred Astaire) who dealt with what was. considered the destructive crisis of the planet. It’s time. Released in 1959, “On the Beach” depicts the slow and silent annihilation of mankind from the nuclear fallout from World War III.

To use a scholarly term, it’s a real bummer in a way that’s reflected in the final act of “Don’t Look Up” as the characters face the fact that the end is nigh. Unlike “Don’t Look Up”, “On the Beach” was no laughing matter. He also had no commercial success, losing about $ 700,000 (about $ 6.7 million in today’s dollars).

But “Don’t Look Up” has done something remarkable, although about half of the people who discuss it online seem to hate it.

In an era when audiences crave escape, McKay’s film introduced a thinly veiled critique of climate change discourse among mainstream audiences. Released on Christmas Eve, the star-packed film racked up 111 million viewing hours in its first three days, according to Netflix. It was the world’s No. 1 movie on the streaming service.

Critics either love it or hate it. “Don’t Look Up” has a positive score of 56% on Rotten Tomatoes. But its “audience score” – which was once considered unreliable but has become an increasingly powerful studio marketing tool – is much higher, at 77%. McKay himself, a voice user of social media, defended the film on Twitter. Like, he retweets a lot. For what it’s worth, all of my non-Hollywood left-handed friends I spoke to during the break had either seen it or wanted to see it.

The A-List cast, led by Leonardo DiCaprio and Jennifer Lawrence as scientists unsuccessfully trying to warn the world of a comet rushing towards Earth, clearly helped. In last week’s edition of this newsletter, we hinted at the growing influence of star power in streaming while discussing how IP-based productions have supplanted the ability of actors to attract audiences. at the box office.

I first saw “On the Beach” as part of an undergraduate atomic age history of science class taught at UC Santa Barbara. The film was released 14 years after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and several years before the Cuban Missile Crisis, so the dangers of the bomb were not far from public awareness at the time.

During the Cold War, the uneasy feeling of living with the possibility of nuclear Armageddon visibly permeated popular culture. Who knows how future historians will look back on the responses of cultural industries to our present time?

If we tried to design a program for “Cinema in the Age of the Climate Crisis” it would be pretty slim, especially if the teachers were to stick to popular cuisine rather than the shattering horror of “First.” Reformed ”by Paul Schrader or Al Gore. Documentaries “An Inconvenient Truth”. What else on the list? “Two days later”? Bong Joon-ho’s “snowdrop”?

In a Variety 2019 play about Hollywood and the problem of our changing atmosphere, no less environmentalist than James Cameron wondered about the effect that films could have.

“Frankly [audiences] I don’t want to hear about climate change, ”Cameron told the publication. “We made a [documentary] show titled ‘Years of Dangerous Life.’ We won an Emmy and got canceled. … Do [storytelling] does it do so much good? “

This is an issue that the industry continues to grapple with.

There is surely a choir preaching aspect to “Look not up”. But the response to the film shows that there is at least some appetite for entertainment that directly addresses an issue that many seem intractable. On a much smaller scale, comedian Bo Burnham’s ‘Inside’ special captured the existential fear of Generation Z in the face of various calamities, including climate change, social media and the ongoing pandemic.

Meryl Streep plays the president in “Don’t Look Up”.

(Niko Tavernise / Netflix)

One of the complaints against McKay’s film is that its message isn’t exactly subtle. There are seas of red hats at the rallies for the president played by Meryl Streep. Mark Rylance’s bizarre tech billionaire is trying to cash in on the incoming space object. The switch between black comedy and disastrous warning is a difficult balance to strike.

Many filmmakers delivered their apocalyptic messages by playing with jarring tones. Think Vera Lynn singing “We’ll Meet Again” over mushroom cloud pictures in “Dr. Strangelove” or Burnham’s singing outro “ba-da-da, ba-da-da” for “That Funny Feeling” : “Hey, what can you say? We were late. But it will be over soon.

Others allow themselves to be more strident. In the final footage of “On the Beach,” after the world has finally succumbed to the global radioactive disaster, Kramer cuts a shot of a banner reading “There is still time… brother” on a screaming orchestral score. Yeah, it’s not subtle. I still find it chilling. “Don’t Look Up” also goes for a punch.

Despite its reputation as a liberal demagoguery, Hollywood is still trying to figure out how to use its commercial art to convey anxiety about melting glaciers, rising sea levels, and burning forests. If nothing else, “Don’t Look Up” could break the ice, so to speak.

Stuff you should read

A photo illustration of Bob Chapek and Bob Iger.

(Illustration by Ross May / Los Angeles Times; Photos by Al Seib / Los Angeles Times; Getty Images)

Some links may require a subscription.

Farewell, Bob Iger. Disney’s Bob Chapek era begins now. As Mouse House moves forward without its visionary leader, Chapek must reignite the creative engines to grow Disney +. (LAT)

10 years after the end of his iconic show, Oprah Winfrey still embodies television best today, writes Washington Post television critic Inkoo Kang. (Wapo)

Hollywood is evaluating new production security measures as Omicron surge hits the West Coast. An alliance of Hollywood studios and entertainment industry unions is considering potential changes to current COVID-19 security protocols for film sets. (LAT)

The streaming wars are pushing media groups to spend over $ 100 billion on new content. Capital expenditure comes in fear that it will be more difficult to attract new viewers in 2022. (Financial Times)

Green light! Netflix Co-CEO Ted Sarandos Is Set To Receive $ 40 million in compensation this year. That’s a lot, but it’s also about what he got in 2020. (Variety)

What made Betty White the most beloved TV star of her generation (or maybe any) generation. Television critic Robert Lloyd pays tribute to the late Golden Girl. (LAT)

Week number

$ 4.5 billion

The US-Canadian box office ended 2021 with $ 4.5 billion, according to Comscore, down 60% from the pre-pandemic year of 2019, when the films grossed $ 11.4 billion in the country. Hey, it’s better than 2020, but what’s not?

Of course, the numbers for the full year only tell part of the story. Assn. of theater owners point out that from July to the end of the year, ticket sales were down 40% from the same period in 2019. It’s still not great, but it shows a marked improvement over the course of of the latter half of the year with the arrival of more films and vaccination rates have improved.

Still, it could be a long time before the annual North American box office hits the $ 10 billion mark again. Most movie theater owners, distributors and analysts doubt it will reach that benchmark in 2022. Maybe in 2023?

Next year’s movie lineup features some great Hollywood swings, including “Top Gun: Maverick”, “Black Panther: Wakanda Forever” and “Avatar 2”. The big box office totals that once cheered exhibitors have always depended on blockbusters.

But the “depth” of the market is also important, and a lot of movies that would have filled the numbers between the tent poles – those romantic comedies and adult dramas that we keep buzzing about here – are now going straight to air or get. truncated theatrical releases.

How much permanent dent will this bring to the market? Bloomberg Intelligence Senior Media Analyst Geetha Ranganathan said in a report Monday that shortened movie windows could reduce domestic box office sales by up to 10%. We probably won’t know for a few years.

Hollywood production

Production is generally slow during the holiday season, and it certainly was this year. Productions in the Los Angeles area totaled 95 shooting days for the week that ended Jan. 2, including 93 days for television, two for commercials and none for feature films, according to data from FilmLA.

onsite movie tracker

Some good news

The “spaghetti is back” sign at Rick's Drive In & Out.

(Stéphanie Breijo / Los Angeles Times)

THE SPAGHETTI IS BACK, PEOPLE. I repeat, spaghetti is back.

Forget “Spider-Man”. The marquee that got people excited in Los Angeles’s Frogtown neighborhood was the Rick’s Drive In & Out sign announcing the return of the noodle dish to the old-fashioned Dodger-themed dinner menu.

Times writer Stephanie Breijo delightfully recounted the origin of the unintentionally hilarious sign, which has had a viral moment since its unveiling. Seriously, where has the spaghetti gone and who can we blame?

Breijo also reviews the famous dish (that’s good).



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Names in bold give Los Angeles a new cultural hub https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/02/names-in-bold-give-los-angeles-a-new-cultural-hub/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 15:00:12 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2022/01/02/names-in-bold-give-los-angeles-a-new-cultural-hub/ LOS ANGELES – On a clear December morning, Los Angeles’ biggest hits glow from the roof of the Audrey Irmas Pavilion: You can see the Hollywood Sign, the Griffith Park Observatory, even a snow-capped Mount Baldy, all without squinting. The pavilion, a futuristic three-story trapezoid with a paneled event center, sunken garden and rooftop terrace […]]]>

LOS ANGELES – On a clear December morning, Los Angeles’ biggest hits glow from the roof of the Audrey Irmas Pavilion: You can see the Hollywood Sign, the Griffith Park Observatory, even a snow-capped Mount Baldy, all without squinting.

The pavilion, a futuristic three-story trapezoid with a paneled event center, sunken garden and rooftop terrace in the center of town, will serve Koreatown, which is one of the city’s densest and most diverse neighborhoods.

But it is first and foremost a community space for Wilshire Boulevard Temple, the Byzantine-Romanesque domed synagogue next to the pavilion – the last room in the temple’s long expansion plan.

The dome of the temple was modeled on the Pantheon in Rome. It crowns the sanctuary, whose 1929 construction was supported by heavyweights like the Warner brothers, Universal Pictures founder Carl Laemmle and MGM co-founder Louis B. Mayer, who made an enveloping donation murals by the artist Hugo ballin, coffered ceilings, celestial oculus and stained glass windows.

But in the 2000s, as the congregation shrank and the grounds deteriorated, some temple leaders and members thought it might make sense to sell the building.

The temple’s senior rabbi, Steven Leder, spent six years raising $ 120 million. In 2011, there were renovation plans for the temple of the architect Brenda Levin, and two years later, Los Angeles’ oldest glass workshop, Judson, had restored the shrine’s Gothic Revival windows, sculptor Lita Albuquerque had designed a memorial wall and artist Jenny Holzer had designed a series of benches.

The pavilion was next, in an adjacent parking lot belonging to the temple, but Rabbi Leder needed the right architect: a modernist respectful of tradition.

Enter philanthropist Eli Broad, who reshaped this city’s cultural imprint and left its future in question after his death last year.

Broad, the billionaire developer who spent decades promoting the city with his wife, Edythe, met Rabbi Leder in 2015, a few years before retiring. Rabbi Leder said: “I asked Eli, ‘Will one of the world‘s greatest architects design a building for a synagogue?’ He looked at me and said, “For this shrine on Wilshire Boulevard in Los Angeles?” They’re all going to want to do it.

The pavilion was therefore born. Designed by the Metropolitan art office – the company founded by Pritzker Prize winner Rem Koolhaas – the project also paved the way for another donor, Wallis Annenberg, to realize a long-held vision she had for the city: a center to help people seniors to find a community.

In previous years, clashes with Broad had cost Koolhaas two chances to work with the philanthropist: designing the downtown museum, the Broad, and remodeling and expanding the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Broad, administrator of LACMA, initially supported a structure proposed by Koolhaas, but later changed his mind. He went instead with Renzo Piano, how would actually become the Large Museum of Contemporary Art of LACMA.

“We won the LACMA offer but Eli kicked Rem out and hired Renzo,” Shohei Shigematsu, longtime Koolhaas partner at OMA, said in an interview.

Koolhaas, 77, is known for his theories celebrating urban chaos and works as the headquarters of China Central Television in Beijing, a skyscraper that some saw as glorifying a Chinese propaganda machine but only criticized in New York. Times called it “one of the most alluring and powerful works I have seen in a lifetime of looking at architecture. Artist and architect Hiroshi Sugimoto recently described Koolhaas’ approach as full of” wrong. will “.

But, Koolhaas said in an interview, provocation is no longer his goal. “Maybe 20 years ago,” he said.

It “now feels a bit out of place given that there are so many pressing issues to consider,” he added.

Koolhaas calls Los Angeles a favorite city – he lived here in 1974 when he was writing a screenplay. Commenting on his rejected design, he said, “LACMA may be something that hasn’t been really appreciated. “

Joe Day, a designer and architectural theorist in Los Angeles said: “Koolhaas has often fallen prey to having a compelling idea and the world or its patrons are struggling to catch up.”

Broad had other disagreements, most notably with the architect Frank Gehry, who refused to finish a renovation of the Broad House. (Yet years later, Broad backed Gehry’s design for Disney Hall.)

For the pavilion, Broad advised in 2015 to hold an international competition, which he paid the bill for.

A 15-person panel was assembled for this competition and it narrowed it down from 25 companies to four, which Broad paid $ 100,000 each.

Then OMA was chosen. The temple then received a pledge of $ 30 million from the philanthropist Audrey Irmas, after the Sale of $ 70.5 million of his “blackboard” painting Cy Twombly, and Rabbi Leder continued to fundraise.

Shigematsu, now 48, said: “It was a strange turn of events.”

Recalling the failures leading up to the competition, he said, “To be invited to the temple competition by Eli – and to be selected. We were surprised. “

Koolhaas called his interactions with Broad for the temple’s cordiality, his support “extremely important.” But when the company’s plan was announced, temple worshipers feared Koolhaas’ style would diminish the traditional domed building.

Six years later, the pavilion, which cost a total of $ 95 million, is warm and vibrant, with 1,230 hexagonal fiberglass reinforced concrete panels that create a kaleidoscope effect. But perhaps the most interesting for some would be that the Broad-Koolhaas collaboration does not involve a Koolhaas building.

“A lot of people are confused,” Shigematsu said. “OMA is in a period of transition. It used to be Rem as a leader, but now it’s a partnership. I’m the design manager here. Unfortunately, most people write that this is Rem’s building.

“In this case, he wasn’t really involved,” added Shigematsu. “He designed the mezuza,” on the door frames of the pavilion, “and it was a way of showing that we can work together in the partnership – and the temple was very happy.”

Koolhaas, who had been unable to leave Europe for a long time due to Covid-19 travel restrictions, said: “I have been involved from a distance”.

“The obsession with architecture as the work of one genius – I think it’s completely out of place,” he added.

Doug Suisman, architect author of “Los Angeles Boulevard“, called the result of the collaboration” a generational shift within OMA, from the cheerful aggressiveness of Rem Koolhaas to the almost contemplative calm of Shohei Shigematsu. “

Koolhaas said, “My partners have a lot of independence and in a way I have a lot of independence now. It’s a pretty intense effort to inject your vision into every project.

In 2018, the OMA’s design for the pavilion was disclosed, and as philanthropist Wallis Annenberg leafed through her article, she read about the temple project and its architects, location, and direction. “Focus,” she said.

For years, she said, she had wondered, “What if I was alone without a support system?” “

“Even at a young age, I noticed old people alone in restaurants, theaters, parks, and it broke my heart,” she said, citing psychologist Erik’s concept of development. Erikson extending to old age. “Why don’t we integrate these people into a community? “

Annenberg contributed $ 15 million to complete the pavilion and an additional $ 3 million for a 7,000-square-foot third-floor creative center, called GenSpace. It is a cultural space for the elderly.

“Lectures, films, experiences – that sets him apart and that’s what older people want,” said Lila Guirguis, Managing Director of the Karsh Center, a non-profit organization founded by the temple for disadvantaged people of all ages in partnership with GenSpace.

Membership is $ 10 per month, with a sliding scale, and courses have already been offered online. (The release of the Omicron variant delayed the abrupt opening of GenSpace.) The center feels like a start-up, with a firm interior design Stadler &, interactive art of the Japanese collective teamLab, and Maira Kalman wallpaper, as well as a workout studio and rooftop terrace.

Annenberg, 82, is the president and president of her family foundation, who has donated over $ 1 billion to approximately 3,800 nonprofits since she took over in 2009. “I have the opportunity to thrive, to live a semi-living life. and connect with people of all ages, ”she said.

“But,” she added, “I slowed down a lot; I have big mobility problems. I think the pandemic has taught us all how critical connectivity is. “

Annenberg’s grandfather, Moses, came to America in 1885 and founded a publishing empire. Her father, Walter, started the foundation which has helped countless educational, artistic, medical and environmental projects.

Wallis, which has in a Vanity Fair interview jokingly reminded people that her name is not Wallet, is an heiress, but her life has not been carefree: her brother, Roger, committed suicide; her marriage fell apart and she lost custody of her children for a time.

Today, 27 institutions in the Los Angeles area bear his name (even more bear the surname). She sees GenSpace as “a role model for people to follow.”

Longevity and the care of the elderly are growing issues. More than 7,000 Californians turn 65 every week, according to recent state report master plan on aging, and the state has the second highest life expectancy in the country. Director of GenSpace, Jennifer wong, who was a co-author of the blueprint, said she anticipates conversations at the center that transcend ethnic and generational lines. The center also has a mission to fight against the prejudices and isolation that older people may face.

As for Annenberg, she sees this as part of her legacy – a job that will continue after she leaves. “I’m not going to be here forever,” she said.

“Older Americans are not the past,” she added. “They are the future. You have to open your eyes. ”


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Ducks lose to Golden Knights in Pacific Division lead showdown – Orange County Register https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/31/ducks-lose-to-golden-knights-in-pacific-division-lead-showdown-orange-county-register/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:53:30 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/31/ducks-lose-to-golden-knights-in-pacific-division-lead-showdown-orange-county-register/ The Ducks did not compete in the Pacific Division first-place showdown, which fell short of the Vegas Golden Knights on Friday afternoon. The Ducks lost battles all around the ice and only John Gibson’s remarkable goalkeepers and powerful shots on goal kept them within striking distance. Vegas controlled the game from start to finish and […]]]>

The Ducks did not compete in the Pacific Division first-place showdown, which fell short of the Vegas Golden Knights on Friday afternoon. The Ducks lost battles all around the ice and only John Gibson’s remarkable goalkeepers and powerful shots on goal kept them within striking distance.

Vegas controlled the game from start to finish and clinched a 3-1 victory over the visiting Ducks, maintaining their leading position in the division. The Ducks could have passed Vegas in the lead with a win, but they didn’t play with the sense of urgency or efficiency needed.

Nicolas Roy, Adam Brooks and Mattias Janmark scored for Vegas. Gibson fought off Janmark on a second period penalty shot, one of 42 saves he made. The Ducks’ penalty kill deprived the Golden Knights of six power play chances, including four in the first two periods.

Ducks captain Ryan Getzlaf scored a power-play goal with 12 seconds left.

Getzlaf tried to inject some life into his listless teammates, fighting fourth in line Keegan Kolesar with a ham fist after Kolesar opposed Getzlaf’s run to William Karlsson a few minutes earlier. Ducks executor Nicolas Deslauriers was then fined 10 minutes for biting with Michael Amadio.

Moments later, Sam Carrick knocked Amadio out onto the ice, triggering another skirmish featuring a fight between the Ducks’ Derek Grant and Brayden McNabb. It all preceded a rather questionable penalty shot awarded to Janmark after Josh Manson was judged to have held him back in a one-on-one battle.

None of the Vegas goals were works of art, but they came through hard work. Roy’s goal ricocheted off his shin as he won a battle for position ahead of Gibson. Brooks’ goal deflected his butt and passed Gibson. Janmark’s score came after a goal battle with William Carrier that pushed Gibson into his net.

The Ducks, however, refused to contest for interference with the goalie.

More to come on this story.


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The Rebels defeat the Raiders in a high-score battle https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/30/the-rebels-defeat-the-raiders-in-a-high-score-battle/ Thu, 30 Dec 2021 05:48:06 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/30/the-rebels-defeat-the-raiders-in-a-high-score-battle/ While the score was 2-1 in favor of the Rebels, the Raiders slightly outscored Red Deer 9-7. The second period was no less exciting than the first, as Red Deer’s Kalan Lind scored his seventh goal this season at 2:24. He was assisted by Kyle Masters and Matteo Fabrizi and scored 3-1. Just over two […]]]>

While the score was 2-1 in favor of the Rebels, the Raiders slightly outscored Red Deer 9-7.

The second period was no less exciting than the first, as Red Deer’s Kalan Lind scored his seventh goal this season at 2:24. He was assisted by Kyle Masters and Matteo Fabrizi and scored 3-1.

Just over two minutes later, Jhett Larson scored his eighth goal of the season assisted by Liam Keeler, making it 4-1.

With the Rebels’ Ben King in the box for a stick high, Prince Albert seized the opportunity to have the men’s advantage at 7:45 with Hayden Pakkala scoring his fifth goal of the season. Assisted by Ozzy Wiesblatt and Cole Sanders, the power-play goal brought the score to 4-2, still in favor of the Rebels.

Then with Red Deer’s Ben King in the box once again, this time tripping, the Rebels scored halfway through the period with Jace Isley’s fifth goal of the season. The short-term goal increased the Rebels’ lead to 5-2.

The Raiders ended the period on a high note, however, as Vladislav Shilo scored his very first WHL goal at 4:12 pm, assisted by Tyson Laventure and Lendon Kosior.

At the end of the second, the shots on goal were 17-14 in favor of the Raiders, with the scoreboard showing 5-3 Red Deer.

The final period almost turned the game around as Prince Albert started to catch up, scoring at 3:34 with Sloan Stanick’s 11e goal of the season and second of the game. Assisted again by Ozzy Wiesblatt and Carson Latimer, the score was now 5-4.

Red Deer didn’t take their slight lead for granted, however, scoring less than a minute later with Liam Keeler’s 10.e goal this season. Maintaining a 6-4 lead, the goal was assisted by Blake Stevenson.

To further consolidate the victory, Carter Anderson of the Rebels scored his sixth goal of the season, once again assisted by Blake Stevenson and Liam Keeler. At 6:15, the score was 7-4 for the Rebels.

Red Deer’s Blake Stevenson ended his team’s dominance early on, with another goal at 8:31 am his 11the this season which brought the game to 8-4.

Vladislav Shilo of Prince Albert not only scored his first goal of the season this game, but also earned a hat trick in the final period. At 5:21 pm, he scored his second goal of the game and of the season, assisted by Tyson Laventure, and bringing the score to 8-5.

With Red Deer’s Matteo Fabrizi sent into the box for detention, Shilo went on to score his first power play goal and third this season at 6:38 pm. Assisted by Carson Latimer and Nolan Allan, the match ended 8-6 in favor of the Rebels.

The Raiders outscored the Rebels 15-13 in the third period for a total of 41-34 over three periods in favor of PA.

The Raiders also got 2/8 on the power play, while Red Deer got 1/3 on the power play.

The third star went to three-time scorer Vladislav Shilo of the Raiders, while the second star went to Liam Keeler of the Rebels who had one goal and two assists. The first star went to Blake Stevenson of Red Deer for his two goals and two assists.

The win takes the Rebels’ record to 22-9-1-1, while the loss leaves the Raiders with a 12-6-1-1 record.

Red Deer will play its last game of the year in Moose Jaw against the Warriors this Friday, Dec.31 at Mosaic Place at 6 p.m. MT.


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Raleigh’s Litchford 315 apartment projects fully stabilized by end of 2021 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/28/raleighs-litchford-315-apartment-projects-fully-stabilized-by-end-of-2021/ Tue, 28 Dec 2021 11:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/28/raleighs-litchford-315-apartment-projects-fully-stabilized-by-end-of-2021/ Drucker + Falk rents 70% of community in under six months and floor plan unit types increased up to 15% from pro forma RALEIGH, North Carolina, December 28, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Litchford 315, a class A community in Raleigh, North Carolina, invites you home with its modernized interior finishes, stainless steel appliances, sleek […]]]>

Drucker + Falk rents 70% of community in under six months and floor plan unit types increased up to 15% from pro forma

RALEIGH, North Carolina, December 28, 2021 / PRNewswire-PRWeb / – Litchford 315, a class A community in Raleigh, North Carolina, invites you home with its modernized interior finishes, stainless steel appliances, sleek natural stone countertops, resident clubhouse, resort-style swimming pool, state-of-the-art fitness center with a Adjoining private training area featuring an interactive MIRROR fitness center, fully fenced dog park and complex, and much more. Offering one, two and three bedroom floor plans with contemporary and stylish features, Litchford 315 is located close to modern-inspired cafes, pubs, restaurants, art and outdoor activities , and has over 14 acres of beautifully landscaped grounds.

DF Multifamily, a division of Drucker + Falk (DF), one of the largest multi-family management companies in the country, not only took over the management of Litchford 315, but was also involved in the pre-construction and design period as well as the pre-construction efforts. rental. DF has joined forces with Raleigh, North Carolina-based Dewitt Carolines, Inc., a real estate development company with 25 years of experience building large-scale residential and commercial properties and, over the past 40 years, has developed over 2,500 multi-family units in the Carolinas. Litchford 315 points the third new development DF has managed for Dewitt in the past five years.

Pre-rental activity turned out to be record-breaking, with over 70% of new apartments rented in the first six months and predicting that the community will be 100% let by the end of 2021, less than nine months after the start of the year. ‘opening. in spring 2021. Pro forma rents, which were at or above competitive market rates, were increased by up to 15% on several types of floor plan units, exceeding the owner’s pro forma budget.

Kellie falk, Managing Director of DF, said: “We are both honored and excited to start renting yet another breathtaking apartment community for our partner clients at Dewitt Carolinas. As we always strive for optimal results for our clients, I applaud our amazing DF team on the success this rental has taken and we have also heard the same feedback from our client. “

Everett Daniels, President, Dewitt Carolinas, Inc said: “We are delighted with the opportunity to work again with Drucker + Falk to lease and manage the luxurious Litchford 315, a wonderful living option for the people of Raleigh. The success thus seen at Litchford 315 is a demonstration of the confidence DeWitt has in the DF teams. We look forward to continued rental and management successes and the advancement of our relationship with Drucker + Falk. “

ABOUT DRUCKER + FALK
Founded in 1938, Drucker + Falk is a full-service real estate and investment firm, managing a diverse portfolio of more than 40,000 apartments in 11 states, including Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, Caroline from the south, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, and Texas. With roots in third party fee management, Drucker + Falk specializes in multi-family management of all types of assets, consultation and leasing of new developments, urban revitalization, asset repositioning and stabilization of assets. difficult properties, mixed-use management and due diligence services. With over 3 million square feet under management, Drucker + Falk also offers commercial sales, rental and management services.

Media contact

Amanda mccrowell, Drucker + Falk, 757-406-1187, am@two17.co

Twitter, Facebook

SOURCE Drucker + Falk



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Would Keynes have invested his money in Bitcoin? https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/26/would-keynes-have-invested-his-money-in-bitcoin/ Sun, 26 Dec 2021 18:00:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/26/would-keynes-have-invested-his-money-in-bitcoin/ John Maynard Keynes was the greatest economist of the twentieth century. What is less well known is that he had a parallel career as investor: quite successful at the start of his career and spectacularly successful later when he changed his strategy. After the First World War, his income depended more on his investments than […]]]>

John Maynard Keynes was the greatest economist of the twentieth century. What is less well known is that he had a parallel career as investor: quite successful at the start of his career and spectacularly successful later when he changed his strategy.

After the First World War, his income depended more on his investments than on his academic work.

In addition to his personal investments, he managed the investments of King’s College Cambridge, of which he was a member.

Under his leadership, the value of the King’s College fund increased twelve times over a period in which the larger markets have not even doubled.

It has been said that Keynes achieved these high returns by not spending a half hour every morning to the task before getting out of bed.

Keynes cited with approval to his friends a line of Volpone, a classic poem:

“I pride myself more on the clever purchase of my wealth than on the happy possession”

He certainly seemed to place more importance on the skill with which he made money than on the money itself. He saw strategy as an alternative to art for someone who does not have the required talent.

Young Keynes

Keynes, in his youth, was very confident in his own abilities, and less in those of the general public.

In his early investments, he tried to take advantage of market timing, staying right in front of the crowds.

Compared to the crowd at that time, young Keynes invested more in stocks (stocks) than in bonds (debt).

He also speculated on exchange rates and commodities. And he was much more willing than the crowd at the time to invest outside his country, being fond of Australian government bonds.

Among his portfolio were modern artwork. Some were his friends but – judging by the records he kept of their prices – some were also used as investments.

He spent 13,000 yen to accumulate works of art valued at 76 million yen in 2019.

Keynes’ artistic judgments produced an annual real rate of return of 6%, which is similar to what he might have earned in stocks. But it provided him with what stocks couldn’t – what the arts and literary group Bloomsbury, of which he was a part, called “the pleasure of beautiful objects”.

This young Keynes would have certainly thought of Bitcoin, believing that he could buy something before it got big, then sell on time.

But the formula didn’t always work, even for him.

Older and Wiser Keynes

The former Keynes switched to value investing, carefully selecting and holding stocks with the prospect of good long-term returns. It turned out more success.

He now considered that trying to get the timing right for cyclical investing was “impractical”, claiming that most of those who attempt to do so “sell too late and buy too late”.

He wrote that most of those who try it focus too much on capital appreciation and too little on “immediate return or future prospects and intrinsic value.”

One of the most successful investors today, Warren buffett, wrote his admiration for Keynes shine and imitated his style.

Shortly before his death, Keynes warned of the dangers for investors to join the bandwagon. As he says “if everyone agrees on its merits, the investment is necessarily too expensive and therefore unattractive”.

During this most successful period, Keynes avoided betting on products without fundamental value.

And he worried about them for broader reasons. As he says in his 1936 General theory:

“When the development of a country’s capital becomes a by-product of a casino’s activities, the job risks being done badly.”

The Keynes of the last days would not have bought Bitcoin and even preached against it.

These are the Keynes whose investments have been the most successful.

John hawkins is a lecturer at the Canberra School of Politics, Economics and Society and NATSEM at the University of Canberra.

Cornish Selwyn is Adjunct Associate Professor in the Research School of Economics, Australian National University.

This article first appeared on The conversation.


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Remembering Joan Didion: “Her ability to function outside of herself was unprecedented” | Books https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/24/remembering-joan-didion-her-ability-to-function-outside-of-herself-was-unprecedented-books/ Fri, 24 Dec 2021 19:03:00 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/24/remembering-joan-didion-her-ability-to-function-outside-of-herself-was-unprecedented-books/ There is this famous photo of Joan Didion, taken in Malibu in 1976, in which she leans on a terrace overlooking the beach, cigarette in hand, glass of scotch on her elbow, and looks at her family – John Dunne, her husband, and their 10-year-old daughter, Quintana – through lowered and sideways eyes. Like other […]]]>

There is this famous photo of Joan Didion, taken in Malibu in 1976, in which she leans on a terrace overlooking the beach, cigarette in hand, glass of scotch on her elbow, and looks at her family – John Dunne, her husband, and their 10-year-old daughter, Quintana – through lowered and sideways eyes. Like other iconic Didion photos from the time, she’s out of the group, to the side and in this case, not looking at the camera but her family as they gaze at the camera. This is the pose Didion perfected, in life and in art, and when news of his death at the age of 87 broke on Thursday, it was a shock to see another frame from that footage do. line surface. In it, Didion, staring forward, smiles broadly at the camera in the conventional style – a rare glimpse behind the character.

Didion’s paradox was not uncommon among writers, whose confidence often grew out of a million anguish. But her ability to operate outside of herself – to measure the gap between inside and outside and slyly mocking any effort to hide it – was unprecedented. She was, notoriously and by her own testimony, shy, brittle, puny, migraine-prone, scared of the phone, and as she writes in the preface to her 1968 collection Slouching Towards Bethlehem, “bad at interviewing people. people, ”apparent deficits which, in Didion’s hands, were of course precisely what allowed him to enter places his rivals – especially the tough men of journalism of the 1960s – couldn’t reach.

She was also generous and kind to young writers. I interviewed her twice in her sleek, sprawling apartment on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, where the doormen gallantly called her “Mrs. Dunne.” She wasn’t difficult to interview, but she came out of silences that could irritate. The second time we met, I brought her some cookies and, handing them to the door, she looked at the package as if I had passed her a rattlesnake. It is an effect of the chain reading of Didion that the little moments become overloaded with fallacious meaning and remembering this scene, it seems to me that when she looked up at me, it was with an expression that indicated, simultaneously, that she was touched by the gesture and that if we were honest, we could also recognize it as awkwardness amounting to insanity.

Interpretations of what her elegiac voice meant to the country that made her are best left to Americans. I just liked his sentences. She’s one of the few prose writers that I remember whole sections by heart and they play like old songs. His line on Joan Baez, written in 1966, remains unfounded as a description of what fame does to people. (Baez, she wrote, after weeks of observing him, “was a personality before she was fully a person, and, like anyone to whom this happens, she is in a sense the unfortunate victim of what others saw in her. “) I remember the” artificial blue rain “in John Wayne’s opening paragraph: a love affair as if I myself had been to the Officers’ Club in Colorado Springs in the summer of 1943. The line “the center did not hold” strikes one as squarely in the chest as at the first reading.

And then there’s the Year of Magical Thinking, a writing about the double blow of her husband’s death in 2003, followed 16 months later by the death of their daughter. She shouldn’t have been able to write about it. The fact that she could, and so soon, still strikes me as scandalous, and the lesson of this book and its writing in general seems clear; that there was nothing that Didion and by extension us, his readers, could not absorb, fix, stake out the most distant limits. The sense of security through horror that comes with this skill is a definition of what writing is for. He provided comfort amounting to love.


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ArtSci Roundup: UW Dance Presents, 2022 History Lecture Series & More https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/22/artsci-roundup-uw-dance-presents-2022-history-lecture-series-more/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 19:58:39 +0000 https://iainabrach.org/2021/12/22/artsci-roundup-uw-dance-presents-2022-history-lecture-series-more/ arts and entertainment 22 December 2021 Through public events and exhibits, connect with the UW community every week! Many of these opportunities are broadcast through Zoom. All UW faculty, staff and students have access to Zoom Pro via UW-IT. Beyond Economic Mobility: Can Higher Education Advance Racial Equity? January 7 5.30 p.m. – 6.30 p.m. […]]]>

arts and entertainment

22 December 2021


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