Modern games get attention but it seems to fade fast

Hundreds of games have been created and released partly because there are so many people who want the ability to sit in front of a computer screen, and partly because funding has allowed developers to collect funds to produce games that any financial institution would have refused. for a loan.

YORKTON – The current millennium has largely been a very positive time for board games.

Hundreds of games have been created and released partly because there are so many people who want the ability to sit in front of a computer screen, and partly because funding has allowed developers to collect funds to produce games that any financial institution would have refused. for a loan.

Now, just because a game gets released doesn’t mean it’s a great, or even a good game.

Monopoly has been around for decades and still sells well, but has glaring flaws, from eliminating players that leave them sitting too long, to games that are rarely played to the end because they get bogged down in the game. ‘boredom.

And more recently there’s the case of Exploding Kittens which raised nearly $9 million on Kickstarter, and yet it’s a filler game at best and not particularly good at it.

But, as is always the case with board games, you have to wade through quite a bit of chaff to find the best cores.

Take for example my favorite abstract strategy games. The current millennium has been a virtual renaissance for the genre.

In fact, during the first decade 2000-2009, some of the best abstract strategy games ever made hit the market – Hive, Arimaa, Dvonn, Yinsh, Tzaar and Navia Drapt among quite a long list. The decade saw more great abstract strategy games hitting the market than the previous half-century.

That’s not to say that any great games came out from 1950 to 1999, but the list isn’t particularly long, and frankly, most aren’t played to any great extent anymore.

This is partly because companies release a title, give it a boost with advertising, and then move on to the next project.

Along the way, players often “break” games, and while they can be fixed with a rule tweak or two, they get left behind because no one is able to make the necessary changes.

Certainly, the chess we play today has been modified over the centuries. The Queen was not originally the high-profile centerpiece she is today.

Of course, today, if you need to polish chess, there is a worldwide organization that has the power to change the rules.

Having organizations such as Chess, Go, Othello, International Checkers is important.

Such organizations do not exist for more recent abstract strategy games.

They also didn’t say Chase which was produced in 1985. It’s a game with lots of in-game options with depth to rival chess, but it’s little known almost 40 years after its release – although it should be played around the world in my opinion.

Then there’s the 1992 release, Terrace, which had some notoriety as it was seen in an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation.

The game has a great board, nice pieces, interesting moves, but the rules never quite felt right in some ways. There was actually a suggested ‘fix’ in a short-lived Terrace newsletter, but they were never made official – and even if you find the game in a thrift store, the rules suggestion is to be found online – not as easy as it sounds.

Again, if an organization had taken root, over the years they might have tweaked the game to be great instead of sadly largely forgotten.

It makes you wonder if any of the great games of this millennium survive with a reasonable level of interest and play?

The answer will probably be very few, and most likely none, and that’s unfortunate.

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